Item Details

Found in Philip S. Hench Walter Reed Yellow Fever Collection circa 1800-circa 1998 bulk 1863-1974

series
Series XIV. P. Kahler Hench additions
inclusive1860/1965 circa 1860-1965
bulk1898/1965 bulk 1898-1965
Digital Repository PIDViU-HUSuva-lib:2231610
Boxbox141-150
10 boxes

Series XIV. P. Kahler Hench additions consists of original and photocopied materials that Philip Showalter Hench's son, P. Kahler Hench, donated to the University of Virginia in 1988 and 1989. Items in the series date from around 1860 to 1965 with the bulk of the materials dating from 1898 to 1965. Most of these items were collected or created by Philip Showalter Hench while researching the yellow fever experiments. These items include the following:

    simple
  • the correspondence of experiment participants;
  • correspondence between Philip Showalter Hench and the experiment participants;
  • correspondence between Philip Showalter Hench and families of the experiment participants;
  • press clippings relating to the experiments and the experiment participants;
  • oral history interviews conducted by Philip Showalter Hench;
  • scientific articles related to the study of yellow fever;
  • photographs of Havana, Camp Columbia, and Camp Lazear;
  • genealogical tables and summaries for the family of Jesse W. Lazear;
  • autobiographical accounts written by experiment participants;
  • unpublished manuscripts;
  • artifacts (e.g. a wooden board) from Camp Lazear;
  • Philip Showalter Hench's research notes.

Series XIV. also contains correspondence and financial records that record the transfer of collection items from the Reed family to Philip Showalter Hench and later from the Hench family to the University of Virginia.

external
655aatadvertisements
655aatagreements
655aatarticles
655aatbiographies (documents)
655aatboards (flat objects)
655aatbusiness cards
655aatcheckbooks
655aatchecks (bank checks)
655aatcitations (bibliographic)
655aatclippings (information artifacts)
655aatdiplomas
655aateditorial cartoons
655aatexcerpts
655aatfloor plans
655aatgenealogical tables
655aatgenealogies (histories)
655aatgreeting cards
655aatinventories
655aatinvitations
655aatjournals (periodicals)
655aatletters (correspondence)
655aatlists (document genres)
655aatmagazines (periodicals)
655aatmanuscripts (document genre)
655aatmaps (documents)
655aatmemorandums
655aatmilitary records
655aatminutes (administrative records)
655aatnegatives (photographic)
655aatnewspapers
655aatnotes
655aatobituaries
655aatoral histories (document genres)
655aatpamphlets
655aatpaper (fiber product)
655aatphotographs
655aatpostcards
655aatprograms (documents)
655aatquestionnaires
655aatreceipts (financial records)
655aatreports
655aatspeeches
655aattables (documents)
655aattelegrams
655aattimelines (chronologies)
655aatvisiting cards

Letter from Walter Reed to Emilie Lawrence Reed February 5, 1901

Reed describes the triumph of the Yellow Fever Commission's work, and a Congressional resolution of appreciation.

Letter from Emilie Lawrence Reed to Howard A. Kelly with recollections of her family life November 12, 1922

Letter from Emilie Lawrence Reed to Howard A. Kelly November 12, 1922

Emilie Lawrence Reed seeks a pension increase. She writes about Marie Gorgas' pension and discusses the public stature of William Gorgas.

Letter from [Howard A. Kelly] to Emilie Lawrence Reed November 14, 1922

[Kelly] writes that he supports Emilie Lawrence Reed's pension increase.

Emilie Lawrence Reed's recollections of the Reed family cat and other aspects of her family life  circa 1922

Emilie Lawrence Reed provides information on Walter Reed's favorite pet and her family life for Kelly.

Emilie Lawrence Reed's description of Walter Reed's final illness for Howard A. Kelly 1922

As requested by Kelly, [Emilie Lawrence Reed] writes a description of Walter Reed's illness, treatment, and death.

Letter from George M. Sternberg to Walter Reed July 3, 1893

Sternberg wants Reed to be examined for promotion by the Board of Medical Officers.

Letter from George M. Sternberg to Walter Reed January 19, 1894

Sternberg discusses his theory of yellow fever and the necessary preventative measures to combat the spread of yellow fever.

Letter from George M. Sternberg to the Secretary of War March 25, 1898

Sternberg reports on the prevalence of yellow fever in Cuba. He relates the history of yellow fever epidemics, and provides statistics on yellow fever throughout Cuba.

Letter from Jefferson Randolph Kean to Mrs. Mason Young May 25, 1899

Jefferson Randolph Kean discusses family news and life in Cuba.

Letter from George W. Sternberg to Aristides Agramonte June 5, 1899

Sternberg sends checks for research-related expenses.

Letter from Jefferson Randolph Kean to Mrs. Mason Young June 23, 1899

Kean considers sending his family back to the United States because of the risk of yellow fever.

Letter from Louise Young Kean to Mrs. Mason Young July 10, 1899

Louise Kean provides news about yellow fever.

Letter from Jefferson Randolph Kean to Mrs. Mason Young July 12, 1899

Kean discusses the mystery of yellow fever, its effects and spread. He comments the state of sanitary conditions at the newly built Camp Columbia.

Letter from Louise Young Kean to Mrs. Mason Young March 27, 1900

Louise Kean writes about family news and political intrigue in Marianao. She comments on Cuban politics.

Letter from Louise Young Kean to Mrs. Mason Young April 1, 1900

Louise Kean mentions a mutiny on the Sedgewick and a reception for Senators at the governor's palace. Either Jefferson Randolph Kean or Gorgas will be named Chief Surgeon of the Department.

Letter from Louise Young Kean to Mrs. Mason Young April 8, 1900

Louise Kean writes to her mother about consultations to secure Jefferson Randolph Kean's position as Chief Surgeon of General Lee's Province.

Letter from Louise Young Kean to Mrs. Mason Young April 26, 1900

Louise Kean writes about quarantine and sanitation rules for yellow fever in Cuba, Jefferson Randolph Kean's work in Havana, and her plans to leave Cuba.

Letter from Louise Young Kean to Mrs. Mason Young June 13, 1900

Louise Kean writes about daily life in Cuba and cases of yellow fever in Havana and on the Post.

Letter fragment from Jefferson Randolph Kean to Mrs. Mason Young with clipping 1900

Kean discusses the responsibilities of his new position as part of the Cuban government. He mentions his son and a visit to the Governor's palace.

Letter fragment from Jefferson Randolph Kean to Mrs. Mason Young September 8, 1900

Kean discusses the responsibilities of his new position as part of the Cuban government. He mentions his son and a visit to the Governor's palace.

Letter from Jefferson Randolph Kean to Mrs. Mason Young October 20, 1900

Kean discusses efforts to control yellow fever, and notes the extent to which it has spread in the corps.

Letter from Jefferson Randolph Kean to Mrs. Mason Young November 5, 1900

Kean writes about his rationale for remaining as Post Surgeon at Columbia Barracks instead of taking position at Fort McHenry, Baltimore. He comments on the lasting value of Reed's work.

Letter from Louise Young Kean to Mrs. Mason Young November 9, 1900

Louise Kean discusses her decision to stay in Cuba and her life at the post. In a postscript she mentions the excitement surrounding the yellow fever experiments.

Letter from [Louise Young Kean] and Jefferson Randolph Kean to Mrs. Mason Young November 18, 1900

The Keans discuss social events among the army personnel and a move to new quarters. The postscript mentions the reaction of the popular press and the medical journals to the mosquito theory.

Letter from Louise Young Kean to Mrs. Mason Young November 25, 1900

Louise Kean writes about cases of yellow fever and news of the family.

Letter from Louise Young Kean to Mrs. Mason Young December 9, 1900

Louise Kean writes that Jefferson Randolph Kean's stepmother is coming to Cuba. She describes the excitement over the first case of experimental yellow fever at Camp Lazear.

Letter from Louise Young Kean to Mrs. Mason Young December 14, 1900

Louise Kean writes about the success of Reed's yellow fever experiments with infected mosquitoes and clothing.

Letter from George Miller Sternberg to Walter Reed December 20, 1900

Sternberg responds to Reed's letter concerning the success of the experiments. He notes that he has received reprints of Reed's paper in the "Journal of Experimental Medicine."

Letter from Jefferson Randolph Kean to Mrs. Mason Young December 23, 1900

Kean writes about studying for his upcoming promotion examination. He notes that the scientists are seeing important results from the mosquito experiments. A dinner will be held in honor of Finlay.

Letter from George Miller Sternberg to Walter Reed December 27, 1900

Sternberg informs Reed that he will send him to Pan-American Congress to present a supplemental paper.

Letter from Jefferson Randolph Kean to Mrs. Mason Young January 3, 1901

Kean describes the round of New Year's parties, his children, and studying for his promotional exam. Kean also details the success of the mosquito experiments and the army's efforts to eliminate mosquitoes.

Letter from Jefferson Randolph Kean to Mrs. Mason Young January 21, 1901

Kean discusses the health of friends back in the United States. He includes a satirical paragraph on the health of acquaintances.

Letter from Louise Young Kean to Mrs. Mason Young February 3, 1901

Louise Kean writes that Jefferson Randolph Kean is in Washington, D.C. for his promotion exam. She mentions that Ames has contracted yellow fever and that she attended a memorial service for Queen Victoria.

Letter from Jefferson Randolph Kean to Mrs. Mason Young February 28, 1901

Kean writes about his return to Cuba after a trip to the United States. Louise Kean has been active in charitable work around the Camp.

Letter from Louise Young Kean to Mrs. Mason Young April 16, 1901

Louise Kean writes about the use of fumigation against yellow fever, the quarantine in New Orleans, and Jefferson Randolph Kean being placed in charge of the finances for the Yellow Fever Commission.

Letter from Jefferson Randolph Kean to Mrs. Mason Young May 19, 1901

Kean discusses life at Camp Lazear; including acquaintances and political trouble involving his new quarters.

Letter from Louise Young Kean to Mrs. Mason Young December 7, 1901

Louise Kean writes about the Keans' travels, her daughter's ear infections, and a case of experimental yellow fever.

Letter from George Miller Sternberg to Howard A. Kelly December 12, 1902

Sternberg provides his impressions of Reed and his work relative to Kelly's plans to write a biography of Reed.

Letter from Philip Showalter Hench to Colonel Joseph F. Siler November 15, 1946

The letter concerns the memorialization of Camp Lazear in Cuba.

Confidential Memorandum of Trip to Cuba, March 2-11, 1948, by Philip Showalter Hench March 2, 1948-March 11, 1948

In this document, Philip Showalter Hench describes in detail the circumstances of his March 1948 trip to Cuba and events during the trip relating to his research about the yellow fever experiments and the erection of the Camp Lazear National Monument in Cuba.

The Brooklyn Hospital Journal October 1948

Contains the article entitled, The Work of Dr. Walter Reed.

"The Military Surgeon" October 1954

This issue of the journal contains articles on yellow fever by Mary W. Standlee and S. William Simon.