Item Details

Found in Philip S. Hench Walter Reed Yellow Fever Collection circa 1800-circa 1998 bulk 1863-1974

series
Series VII. Truby-Kean-Hench
inclusive1879/1960 circa 1879-circa 1960
bulk1900/1954 bulk 1900-1954
Digital Repository PIDViU-HUSuva-lib:2229588
Boxbox62-65
4 boxes

Series VII. Truby-Kean-Hench primarily consists of materials relating to Albert E. Truby and Jefferson Randolph Kean that Philip Showalter Hench created or collected while researching the yellow fever experiments. Items in this series date from around 1879 to around 1960 with the bulk of the items dating from 1900 to 1954. These items include, but are not limited to the following:

    simple
  • correspondence of Jefferson Randolph Kean dating from 1900 to 1950 that relates to his personal life, the yellow fever experiments, public health initiatives, his publications, the legacy of the yellow fever experiments, Kean's work in World War I, and other topics;
  • Philip Showalter Hench's correspondence with people related to the yellow fever experiments, particularly Albert E. Truby and Jefferson Randolph Kean primarily from between 1940 and 1955;
  • a scrapbook and other materials that relate to Truby's book, Memoir of Walter Reed: the Yellow Fever Episode;
  • and Philip Showalter Hench's interviews and questionnaires for Kean and Truby from the 1940s.

In addition to the materials relating to Kean and Truby, Series VII. also includes the following:

    simple
  • notes from Philip Showalter Hench's research of the yellow fever experiments;
  • the recollections, autobiographies, and reports of other people involved with the yellow fever experiments including John Andrus and A.S. Pinto;
  • articles and clippings related to the yellow fever experiments;
  • a short biography of Lemuel S. Reed;
  • and a sketch Philp Showalter Hench made of a proposed museum at the Camp Lazear site.

Materials in this series are generally arranged in chronological order regardless of their format and subject matter.

external
655aatannual reports
655aatarticles
655aatbiographies (documents)
655aatcharts (graphic documents)
655aatchronologies (lists)
655aatclippings (information artifacts)
655aatdrawings (visual works)
655aatenvelopes
655aatexecutive orders
655aatexhibit scripts
655aatinterviews
655aatlectures
655aatletters (correspondence)
655aatmanuscripts (document genre)
655aatmaps (documents)
655aatmedical records
655aatmemorandums
655aatmilitary records
655aatnotes
655aatobituaries
655aatoral histories (document genres)
655aatphotographs
655aatpostcards
655aatquestionnaires
655aatreferences
655aatreports
655aatreprints
655aatreviews
655aatscrapbooks
655aatsketches
655aatspeeches
655aattables (documents)
655aattelegrams

Circular number 5, military orders by command of Brigadier General Lee August 18, 1900

This document discusses the diagnosis and treatment of yellow fever in Cuba.

Letter from Jefferson Randolph Kean to Howard Kelly March 25, 1905

Kean recounts Reed's sickness, death, and funeral.

Letter from William Crawford Gorgas to Jefferson Randolph Kean March 26, 1905

Gorgas writes about yellow fever cases in Panama, as well as sanitary efforts and political maneuvering.

Letter from William Crawford Gorgas to Jefferson Randolph Kean April 20, 1905

Gorgas writes about his administration of sanitary affairs in the Canal Zone and political machinations.

Letter from William Crawford Gorgas to Jefferson Randolph Kean June 29, 1905

Gorgas seeks support for his yellow fever work in Panama.

Letter from William Crawford Gorgas to Jefferson Randolph Kean July 1, 1905

Gorgas writes about the use of pyrethrum in the Canal Zone for the treatment of yellow fever and plague.

Letter from William Crawford Gorgas to Jefferson Randolph Kean August 16, 1905

Gorgas recommends King as superintendent of Yellowstone Park. He discusses the functions and administration of the Sanitary Department.

Letter from William Crawford Gorgas to Jefferson Randolph Kean April 25, 1906

Gorgas offers his opinion on the organization of the Sanitary Department in the Canal Zone. He also comments on his candidacy for the office of Surgeon General.

Letter from William Crawford Gorgas to Jefferson Randolph Kean June 6, 1906

Gorgas writes about the management of the Sanitary Department. He comments on his relationship with his superior officers in the government.

Letter from William Crawford Gorgas to Jefferson Randolph Kean July 28, 1906

Gorgas seeks advice on candidates for the Chief of Laboratory. He reports on the state of disease in Panama, noting a small pox outbreak and the absence of yellow fever since May.

Letter from William Crawford Gorgas to Jefferson Randolph Kean with enclosed correspondence between George E. Bushnell and William Crawford Gorgas 1906

Letter from William C. Gorgas to Jefferson Randolph Kean July 30, 1906

Gorgas writes about a planned increase in the Canal Zone medical force, and encloses correspondence recommending physician Alexander Murray for service in Panama.

Letter from George E. Bushnell to William C. Gorgas April 16, 1906

Bushnell recommends physician Alexander Murray to Gorgas for service in Panama and explains Murray's difficult circumstances owing to his wife's illness.

Letter from William C. Gorgas to George E. Bushnell May 3, 1906

Gorgas informs Bushnell that his medical staff is full at present, but that he will consider adding physician Alexander Murray if there is an increase in staffing.

Letter from William Crawford Gorgas to Jefferson Randolph Kean August 4, 1906

Gorgas writes about his reconciliation with Magoon, remarking that Magoon will probably recommend him as his successor in Panama. He also comments on the state of disease in Panama, noting that pneumonia remains primary problem.

Letter from William Crawford Gorgas to Jefferson Randolph Kean August 10, 1906

Gorgas discusses career and salary issues and concerns. Gorgas supports James Carroll for the Nobel Prize.

Letter from Jefferson Randolph Kean to Howard A. Kelly August 16, 1906

Kean argues that Carroll deserves more recognition for his service. The last page includes Kelly's reply, dated September 10, 1906. Kelly writes that he will help to secure cooperation of Congressmen and write an article in support of Congressional action on behalf of the survivors and their families.

Letter from William Crawford Gorgas to Jefferson Randolph Kean August 20, 1906

Gorgas refers to his previous letter soliciting suggestions for the Chief of Laboratory. He offers additional names from which to choose. He mentions other departmental news, including the use of drugs and chemical compounds.

Letter fragment from [William Crawford Gorgas] to Jefferson Randolph Kean September 17, 1906

[Gorgas] writes about political maneuverings for staff appointments and promotions, and recognition for James Carroll.

Letter from Jose Ramos to Jefferson Randolph Kean with mortality chart circa 1879-1907

Letter from Jose Ramos Almeyda to Jefferson Randolph Kean August 31, 1907

Ramos writes about the yellow fever work in Cuba. He encloses a table showing charting fatalities from yellow fever smallpox.

Yellow Fever and Smallpox Table: Mortalidad de las Viruelas y de Fiebre Amarilla circa 1879

This table charts deaths from smallpox and yellow fever in Havana, from 1870-1879.

Letter from Jefferson Randolph Kean to Charles Edward Magoon October 31, 1907

Kean sends Magoon the report of the Chief Sanitary Officer of Cuba for the past year and comments extensively on sanitation and the yellow fever.

Letter from [A. Morejos?] to Jefferson Randolph Kean February 20, 1908

[Morejos?] writes about mosquito eradication and other sanitary measures in various Cuban locations.

Letter from Jefferson Randolph Kean to Provisional Governor of Cuba with an order from the governor 1908

Letter from Jefferson Randolph Kean to the Provisional Governor of Cuba February 20, 1908

Kean cites a lack of support for sanitary measures by the Cuban authorities, and an increase in the incidence of yellow fever. He requests assignment of another medical officer to his staff.

Order from the Provisional Governor February 20, 1908

The Provisional Governor of Cuba grants Kean's request for another medical officer.

Letter from William Crawford Gorgas to Jefferson Randolph Kean March 2, 1908

Gorgas is convinced that mosquito eradication is the only method to keep yellow fever from developing into an epidemic.

Letter from Juan Guiteras to Jefferson Randolph Kean March 19, 1908

Guiteras disputes Gorgas' theories about immunity to yellow fever and eradication of the disease.

Letter from Jefferson Randolph Kean to J.W. Amesse August 5, 1908

Kean suggests that a case of yellow fever was contracted not in Santiago di Cuba but in Daiquiri.

Letter from Juan Guiteras to Jefferson Randolph Kean September 2, 1908

Guiteras discusses his hesitancy to publicize yellow fever cases.

Letter from Jefferson Randolph Kean to J.W. Amesse September 19, 1908

Kean protests against the American quarantine of all Cuban ports.

Letter from Juan Guiteras to Jefferson Randolph Kean September 20, 1908

Guiteras reports to Kean regarding the possible yellow fever cases of Manuel Casas de la Mina and Jesus Torres.

Letter from Carlos J. Finlay to Jefferson Randolph Kean September 21, 1908

Finlay outlines measures taken to ensure that a case of yellow fever, in Havana, does not develop into an epidemic.

Letter from Lopez del Valle to Jefferson Randolph Kean September 22, 1908

Del Valle discusses yellow fever cases in Havana and sanitation measures.

Letters from Carlos J. Finlay and Mario Lebrado with a telegram and a fever chart October 1908

Letter from Carlos J. Finlay to Jefferson Randolph Kean October 2, 1908

Finlay discusses sanitation measures taken in response to possible cases of yellow fever.

Letter from Mario Lebredo to the Head of National Department of Sanitation October 1, 1908

Lebredo discusses the diagnosis of a possible yellow fever case.

Telegram from Carlos J. Finlay to [H.D] Thomason October 2, 1908

Finlay reports on recommendations for prophylactic measures against yellow fever in Felton.

Letter from [Jefferson Randolph Kean] to Juan Guiteras November 17, 1908

[Kean] requests additional experiments using wire mesh as a mosquito control.

Letter from Juan Guiteras to Jefferson Randolph Kean November 19, 1908

Guiteras writes that he will conduct further experiments using wire mesh and additional species of mosquitoes.

Letter from [Jefferson Randolph Kean] to C. H. Ellis June 18, 1909

[Kean] informs Ellis about the military service of John R. Kissinger and gives details of Kissinger's participation in the yellow fever experiments. Included is a note by Truby. [Courtesy of the National Archives and Records Administration]

Letter from Jefferson Randolph Kean to William Crawford Gorgas August 30, 1911

Kean denies a rumor that he has been chosen to succeed General Torney. He informs Gorgas that the 10th Infantry has been ordered to Panama.

Correspondence between Jefferson Randolph Kean and Aristides Agramonte January 1911-September 1911

Letter from Jefferson Randolph Kean to Aristides Agramonte January 26, 1911

Kean requests Agramonte's photograph for a publication about the Yellow Fever Commission. [Courtesy of the National Archives and Records Administration]

Letter from Aristides Agramonte to Jefferson Randolph Kean August 4, 1911

Agramonte informs Kean of Finlay's declining health. [Courtesy of the National Archives and Records Administration]

Letter from Jefferson Randolph Kean to Aristides Agramonte September 12, 1911

Kean acknowledges that Agramonte should get proper credit for his yellow fever work. [Courtesy of the National Archives and Records Administration]

Letter from Aristides Agramonte to Jefferson Randolph Kean November 30, 1912

Agramonte demands that Kean correct the injustice done to him regarding his unfair portrayal in the Yellow Fever Commission. [Courtesy of the National Archives and Records Administration]

Letter from Jefferson Randolph Kean to Aristides Agramonte December 7, 1912

Kean states that Carroll was responsible for the injustice done to Agramonte. [Courtesy of the National Archives and Records Administration]

Lectures on sanitation in Cuba by Jefferson Randolph Kean 1912

Lecture: Sanitation Work in Cuba, by Jefferson Randolph Kean 1910

Kean details the methods the Sanitary Inspectors used in Cuba to combat yellow fever. [Courtesy of the National Archives and Records Administration]

Lecture: Sanitation Work in Cuba, by Jefferson Randolph Kean May 23, 1912

Kean discusses the sanitation efforts used to prevent yellow fever in Cuba from 1906 to 1909. [Courtesy of the National Archives and Records Administration]

Letter from [s.n.] Miller to Jefferson Randolph Kean July 28, 1917

Miller informs Kean that he is unable to supply a list of commissioned officers in Allentown.

Letter from [Jefferson Randolph Kean] to Henry P. Birmingham August 29, 1917

[Kean] questions Birmingham about the organization of the Ambulance Corps in France.

Correspondence of William Crawford Gorgas and Jefferson Randolph Kean August 1917-December 1917

Letter from William Crawford Gorgas to Jefferson Randolph Kean August 10, 1917

Gorgas informs Kean that he has already appointed officers for the Ambulance Corps in France. Kean may fill other places when he arrives.

Letter from Jefferson Randolph Kean to William Crawford Gorgas September 6, 1917

Kean discusses the command structure of the Ambulance Corps in France.

Letter from William Gorgas Crawford to Jefferson Randolph Kean September 14, 1917

Gorgas discusses the manning of ambulance sections in France.

Correspondence of William Crawford Gorgas and Jefferson Randolph Kean November 20, 1917-March 29, 1918

Letter from William Crawford Gorgas to Jefferson Randolph Kean January 14, 1918

Gorgas reports to Kean that he will be receiving reinforcements shortly.

Letter from William Crawford Gorgas to Jefferson Randolph Kean February 11, 1918

Gorgas reports to Kean that Pershing recommends sending the remaining men at Allentown to France. Gorgas approves of Kean's administration.

Letter from Jefferson Randolph Kean to William Crawford Gorgas February 25, 1918

Kean informs Gorgas of his transfer to post of Deputy Chief Surgeon of American Expeditionary Forces. He also describes command reorganizations and the status of ambulance service.

Letter from Jefferson Randolph Kean to Albert E. Truby September 19, 1923

Kean seeks information on J.F. Binnie, an old acquaintance and a patient in Truby's hospital.

Letter from Albert E. Truby to Jefferson Randolph Kean September 26, 1923

Truby relates Binnie's condition. He enjoyed his trip to Europe with the Keans in 1921. He discusses upcoming assignments to Panama or the Philippines.

Letter from Jefferson Randolph Kean to Emilie Lawrence Reed January 17, 1924

Kean informs Emilie Lawrence Reed that his son Robert is graduating from MIT in chemistry. He discusses the role of Sternberg and Gorgas with the Yellow Fever Commission.

Letter from Marie D. Gorgas to Jefferson Randolph Kean March 5, 1924

Marie Gorgas thanks Kean for his informative letter. She is currently collaborating with Hendrick on a biography of Gorgas.

Letter from Jefferson Randolph Kean to Emilie Lawrence Reed April 2, 1924

Kean expresses his disapproval of the claims made by Marie Gorgas' in her biography of William Crawford Gorgas.

Letter from Jefferson Randolph Kean to the Editor of World's Work April 10, 1924

Kean writes to the editor in order to dispute the claims made by Marie Gorgas in her article on her husband. He requests that a letter of clarification be published in the journal.

Letter from Jefferson Randolph Kean to Emilie Lawrence Reed April 11, 1924

Kean informs Emilie Lawrence Reed that he wrote to the editor of World's Work to dispute the claims made by Marie Gorgas as regards the Yellow Fever Commission.

Letter from Burton J. Hendrick to Jefferson Randolph Kean April 14, 1924

Burton informs Kean that the piece published in World's Work, by Marie Gorgas, was an excerpt of her larger work in which Reed does receive credit.

Letter from Jefferson Randolph Kean to Burton J. Hendrick April 15, 1924

Kean expresses doubt that the statements already published in the excerpts of Gorgas' biography can be corrected in the final publication without contradiction.

Letter from Burton J. Hendrick to Jefferson Randolph Kean April 16, 1924

Hendrick agrees to publish Kean's letter, which challenged Marie Gorgas' account of her husband's yellow fever work, in the journal World's Work.

Letter from Jefferson Randolph Kean to Emilie Lawrence Reed circa April 1924

Kean informs Emilie Lawrence Reed that Hendrick will print a correction to an earlier article. This letter is written at the bottom of Hendrick's letter to Kean, dated April 16, 1924. Hendrick writes that the corrections will be made and regrets any offense given Emilie Lawrence Reed.

Letter from Jefferson Randolph Kean to Walter D. McCaw April 18, 1924

Kean informs McCaw that Hendrick has agreed to publish his rebuttal to Marie Gorgas' article.

Letter from Jefferson Randolph Kean to Burton J. Hendrick May 1, 1924

Kean offers an explanation of how his rebuttal letter to Marie Gorgas' article came to be published in New York Times.

Letter from L.O. Howard to Jefferson Randolph Kean May 1, 1924

Howard responds favorably to Kean's letter published in the New York Times, and offers supporting evidence for Kean's claims in the form of quotations from a letter of Reed.

Letter from Burton J. Hendrick to Jefferson Randolph Kean May 5, 1924

Hendrick informs Kean that he had planned to publish his rebuttal letter in the June issue of the World's Work, but withdrew it when he saw it published in the New York Times.

Letter from Jefferson Randolph Kean to Burton J. Hendrick May 6, 1924

Kean mentions Howard's letter, which offers proof of Reed's awareness of the practical effects of his yellow fever experiments.

Letter from Jefferson Randolph Kean to Emilie Lawrence Reed May 6, 1924

Kean informs Emilie Lawrence Reed that the manuscript of Gorgas' biography might be corrected to reflect Reed's role. He will retire to Washington this summer.

Correspondence of L.O. Howard and L.H. Baekeland 1924

Letter from L.O. Howard to Jefferson Randolph Kean May 7, 1924

Howard encloses correspondence with L.H. Baekeland, who proposed sending a letter to the New York Times emphasizing Kean's role in mosquito eradication in Cuba in 1901.

Letter from L. O. Howard to L.H. Baekeland May 7, 1924

Howard informs Baekeland that he does not wish to be involved in the controversy between Marie Gorgas and Kean.

Letter from L.H. Baekeland to L.O. Howard May 5, 1924

Baekeland inquires if Howard objects to him writing a letter to the New York Times.

Letter from Marie D. Gorgas to Jefferson Randolph Kean March 19, 1925

Marie Gorgas writes to Kean that she regrets his disapproval of her biography of William Crawford Gorgas. [Kean] appends a note chastising the authors of the biography for failing to correct errors called to their attention six months before publication.

Correspondence of Jefferson Randolph Kean 1924-1926

Letter from David L. Edsall to Jefferson Randolph Kean December 9, 1924

Edsall requests Kissinger's address. A fund has been established in his name, Harvard University Medical School, which would provide a pension to Ida Kissinger upon John Kissinger's death.

Letter from Jefferson Randolph Kean to the Adjutant General December 11, 1924

Kean requests that Kissinger's address be given to the dean of Harvard Medical School.

Letter from Jerome Clark to David L. Edsall December 15, 1924

Clark provides Edsall with Kissinger's address.

Notes by Jefferson Randolph Kean for the Journal of Association of Military Surgeons September 28, 1926

Kean provides his analysis of the date of the initiation of anti-mosquito efforts in Havana. He cites a report by William Crawford Gorgas, which was written in 1904.

Correspondence of Jefferson Randolph Kean 1927

Letter from Jefferson Randolph Kean to Jorge LeRoy y Cassa August 27, 1927

Kean expresses his disappointment in the competition between Cuba and America regarding the credit for the yellow fever work. According to Kean, it was Reed who demonstrated Finlay's theory and Gorgas who applied it.

"Vindicating Finlay's Glory", Sanidad y Beneficencia, Boletin Oficial by Jorge LeRoy y Cassa [translated from Spanish] February 1927

LeRoy y Cassa defends Finlay against the claims of the Rockefeller Foundation and others. He refers to Marie Gorgas and Burton J. Hendrick's biography of William Crawford Gorgas.

Correspondence of Jefferson Randolph Kean 1928

Letter from Aristides Agramonte to Jefferson Randolph Kean March 12, 1928

Agramonte appreciates Kean's balanced report of the yellow fever work. He comments on current yellow fever work.

Letter from L.O. Howard to Jefferson Randolph Kean March 29, 1928

Howard comments on Kean's account of the yellow fever experiments.

Letter from Jefferson Randolph Kean to Gustaf E. Lambert February 26, 1929

Kean apologizes for not recalling that Lambert was the nurse who cared for him when he was sick with yellow fever. Kean tells Lambert he should be proud of his service in connection with the yellow fever experiments.

Correspondence of Jefferson Randolph Kean 1929

Letter from Jefferson Randolph Kean to Aristides Agramonte January 30, 1929

Kean relates news of the pension bill and notes the recognition of Agramonte's work in the bill.

Letter from Aristides Agramonte to Jefferson Randolph Kean February 2, 1929

Agramonte thanks Kean for news of the pension bill, and expresses appreciation for Ireland's influence.

Letter from Jefferson Randolph Kean to Jessie Daniel Ames March 21, 1929

Kean responds to Ames' inquiry about the pension bill and offers reasons why Roger Ames is not included.

Correspondence of Albert E. Truby and Jefferson Randolph Kean 1930

Memorandum from Albert E. Truby to Jefferson Randolph Kean July 25, 1930

Truby's recounts his memories of the yellow fever experiments, and his anger with Agramonte for making what he feels are unjustified claims.

Correspondence of Jefferson Randolph Kean 1932

Letter from Jefferson Randolph Kean to Frank R. McCoy January 11, 1932

Kean congratulates McCoy on his appointment to Manchuria and comments on Hagedorn's biography of Leonard Wood.

Letter from Frances F. Agramonte to Jefferson Randolph Kean February 1, 1932

Frances Agramonte gives Kean her new address and discusses her health.

Letters from Jefferson Randolph Kean to John J. Moran June 18, 1934-July 24, 1934

Letter from Jefferson Randolph Kean to John J. Moran June 18, 1934

Kean thanks Moran for sending him his immunity certificate signed by the Yellow Fever Board members. Kean comments on the political situation in Cuba.

Letter from Jefferson Randolph Kean to John J. Moran July 24, 1934

Kean accepts Moran's offer to send him his yellow fever clinical chart and comments on conditions in Cuba and the U.S.

Correspondence of Albert E. Truby and Jefferson Randolph Kean 1935

Letter from Albert E. Truby to Jefferson Randolph Kean April 8, 1935

Truby writes to Kean concerning a bust of Reed.

Letter from the Smithsonian Institution to Jefferson Randolph Kean April 10, 1935

This is an invoice to Kean for the return of a marble bust of Reed from the Smithsonian Institution to the Walter Reed Memorial Association.

Letter from Chauncey B. Baker to Jefferson Randolph Kean April 15, 1935

Baker sends Kean his recollections of yellow fever work in Havana from 1898 to 1900.

Correspondence of Albert E. Truby and Jefferson Randolph Kean 1936

Letter from Jefferson Randolph Kean to Albert E. Truby April 20, 1936

Kean inquires about Truby's recollections of the circumstances of Lazear's contraction of yellow fever. He informs Truby that the Cubans intended to memorialize the room at Las Animas where Lazear was said to have been bitten. Kean informed them that this was not true.

Letter from Jefferson Randolph Kean to Albert E. Truby April 25, 1936

Kean discusses the unjustified claims in the Gorgas biography by Burton Hendrick and Marie Gorgas, relates news of an old acquaintance and of his health, and expresses his sympathy for Cuban sensitivity about Finlay.

Letter from Albert E. Truby to Jefferson Randolph Kean April 27, 1936

Truby provides his recollections of the yellow fever experiments, including Lazear's infection, Carroll's and Agramonte's claims, Dean's infection, Kean's leadership, and the memorial plaque for Lazear at Las Animas Hospital.

Correspondence of Albert E. Truby and Jefferson Randolph Kean 1937

Letter from Albert E. Truby to Jefferson Randolph Kean January 26, 1937

Truby writes to Kean concerning identification of the men in a photograph of the Detachment of the Hospital Corps at Camp Columbia, Cuba.

Letter from Jefferson Randolph Kean to Albert E. Truby October 21, 1937

Kean's writes about his surgery for cataracts and provides news of friends and acquaintances.

Memorandum from Robin Lampson December 14, 1937

Lampson solicits information about Gorgas for an upcoming book on the conquest of yellow fever.

Correspondence of Albert E. Truby, Jefferson Randolph Kean, and Philip Showalter Hench 1938

Letter from Jefferson Randolph Kean to John J. Moran April 12, 1938

Kean describes the 1900 Havana Finlay-Reed dinner, which celebrated the conclusive proof of Finlay's theory by Reed's work. He feels that Finlay has not received a fair share of the credit.

Letter from Philip Showalter Hench to Jefferson Randolph Kean October 27, 1939

Hench discusses his interest in the story of the conquest of yellow fever and asks for Kean's involvement.

Letter from Jefferson Randolph Kean to Philip Showalter Hench October 31, 1939

Kean discusses a future meeting with Hench, his relationship with Reed, and his experiences with the yellow fever experiments.

Chronology of yellow fever events 1938

Memorandum from A.S. Dabney to Jefferson Randolph Kean April 15, 1938

Dabney provides Kean with a chronological listing of Reed's service in the U.S. Army Medical Corps.

Correspondence of Albert E. Truby, Jefferson Randolph Kean, and Philip Showalter Hench 1940

Letter from Philip Showalter Hench to Jefferson Randolph Kean May 7, 1940

Hench discusses various meetings he had in Cuba to acquire biographical information.

Letter from Jefferson Randolph Kean to Philip Showalter Hench May 11, 1940

Kean discusses an upcoming meeting with Hench and the honoring of Moran and Kissinger by the Cuban government.

Letter from Jefferson Randolph Kean to Philip Showalter Hench circa May 15, 1940

Kean mentions that his manuscripts related to Reed and yellow fever are at the University of Virginia.

Correspondence of Albert E. Truby, Jefferson Randolph Kean, and Philip Showalter Hench January 1941-February 1941

Letter from Philip Showalter Hench to Jefferson Randolph Kean January 12, 1941

Hench poses questions regarding the yellow fever experiments because he knows that Kean had connections with Reed.

Letter from Albert E. Truby to Philip Showalter Hench January 12, 1941

Truby suggests several corrections for Hench's article. He maintains that Kissinger volunteered before Moran and mentions his plans to work on his own paper. He invites Hench to visit him.

Letter from Albert E. Truby to Philip Showalter Hench January 16, 1941

Truby informs Hench that he will send photographs under a separate cover. He appreciated Hench's comments on his manuscript, but he doesn't agree with all of his views about what happened in Cuba.

Correspondence of Albert E. Truby, Jefferson Randolph Kean, and Philip Showalter Hench March 7, 1941

Letter from Philip Showalter Hench to Albert E. Truby March 4, 1941

Hench informs Truby that he is planning a trip to Havana, and so would like Truby and Kean to write letters of introduction to Ramos.

Letter from Jefferson Randolph Kean to Philip Showalter Hench March 5, 1941

Kean discusses a book he is reading about Finlay. He agrees to write a letter to Ramos.

Letter from Jefferson Randolph Kean to Philip Showalter Hench March 6, 1941

Kean discusses the layout of Camp Lazear. He thinks the location of Camp Lazear is settled by Rojas' daybook entries. He wrote to Dominguez and pointed out the errors in his book.

Transcript and notes from Philip Showalter Hench's interview with Jefferson Randolph Kean concerning the yellow fever experiments May 8, 1941

Transcript of Philip Showalter Hench's interview with Jefferson Randolph Kean May 8, 1941

Hench's interview deals with myriad topics, including: Moran and Kissinger, locations of hospitals and living quarters, the X.Y. case, Kean's case of yellow fever, and the discovery that someone had removed all the papers from Reed's desk after his death.

Correspondence of Albert E. Truby, Jefferson Randolph Kean, and Philip Showalter Hench August 1941-October 1941

Letter from Jefferson Randolph Kean to Philip Showalter Hench August 1, 1941

Kean agrees with Hench that Kissinger needs to be cared for in a veterans' hospital and recommends one in Indianapolis. He also encloses a copy of a letter he wrote to Ida E. Kissinger.

Letter from Jefferson Randolph Kean to Ida E. Kissinger August 1, 1941

Kean recommends to Kissinger that her husband be moved to a veteran's hospital in Indianapolis.

Correspondence of Albert E. Truby, Jefferson Randolph Kean, and Philip Showalter Hench November 1941-December 1941

Letter from Jefferson Randolph Kean to Albert E. Truby November 2, 1941

Kean tells Truby about arrangements being made for the Jefferson Memorial and provides the information Truby requested concerning sanitary arrangements in Cuba.

Letter from Philip Showalter Hench to Albert E. Truby November 2, 1941

Hench sends Truby suggestions for corrections or additions to Truby's manuscript on the story of the yellow fever experiments. He mentions several enclosures, which are not included with this document. An addendum from Hench to Truby on November 10, 1941 is included, as well as a transcription of a letter from James Carroll to his wife.

Letter from Pedro Nogueira to Albert E. Truby November 15, 1941

Nogueira informs Truby that he will contribute to a local history of Marianao, which is currently being written. He inquires about the locations of the mosquito experiments, where Lazear died, where Edmunds was confined, and the role of Cuban doctors in the Yellow Fever Commission's work.

Correspondence of Albert E. Truby, Jefferson Randolph Kean, and Philip Showalter Hench with related newspaper clippings 1942

Letter from Mahlon Ashford to Albert E. Truby January 2, 1942

Ashford, editor of the "Bulletin of the New York Academy of Medicine," expresses an interest in publishing Truby's book on the yellow fever experiments and informs him that Lazear's missing notebook is not to be found at the Academy library.

Letter from Philip Showalter Hench to Jefferson Randolph Kean January 26, 1942

Hench informs Kean that Lazear's niece took him to the old family home where he found letters from Lazear to his mother and other personal items. Hench notes that he has also found Agramonte's leave of absence papers indicating he left Cuba several days before Lazear died.

Letter from Cornelia Knox Kean to Philip Showalter Hench and Mary Hench February 6, 1942

Kean expresses appreciation to Mary and Philip Hench for an enjoyable evening. She informs them that Jefferson Randolph Kean is in the hospital but improving.

Correspondence of Albert E. Truby, Jefferson Randolph Kean, and Philip Showalter Hench 1943

Letter from Jefferson Randolph Kean to James M. Phalen January 29, 1943

Kean states that his reference to Gorgas' Final Report should not diminish Gorgas' credibility and reputation.

Letter from Jefferson Randolph Kean to Philip Showalter Hench January 30, 1943

Kean is concerned that he has wrongly portrayed Gorgas as slow in supporting Reed's findings.

Letter from Philip Showalter Hench to Albert E. Truby February 25, 1943

Hench is anxious to see Truby's book. Hench then mentions that he read Finlay's book, which supports the Cuban perspective that the Americans only confirmed, not proved, the mosquito theory.

Transcript of Philip Showalter Hench's interview with General Jefferson Randolph Kean January 6, 1944

Hench questions Kean about the yellow fever experiments at Camp Lazear.

Correspondence of Albert E. Truby, Jefferson Randolph Kean, and Philip Showalter Hench 1944

Letter from Jefferson Randolph Kean to Albert E. Truby January 8, 1944

Kean describes Hench's visit to his house and admits that his memory is fading.

Letter from Philip Showalter Hench to Albert E. Truby January 27, 1944

Hench promises to send Truby additional extracts from some of Reed's letters. Hench offers his opinion on people who are not fully backing the war effort.

Letter from Lillie W. Franck to Jefferson Randolph Kean February 7, 1944

Franck sends Kean a completed manuscript for Hench [not enclosed]. In a second letter on the same page, dated February 8, 1944, Kean writes to Hench that the manuscript is enclosed. He mentions a newspaper account of the launch of a ship named for James Carroll.

Military orders for Albert E. Truby July 25, 1900

Special Orders #1 direct Truby, Presnell, and Schweiger to accompany the 1st U.S. Infantry to the United States. [Courtesy of the National Archives and Records Administration]

Correspondence of Albert E. Truby, Jefferson Randolph Kean, and Philip Showalter Hench 1945-1946

Letter from Jefferson Randolph Kean to Philip Showalter Hench November 23, 1945

Kean comments on his future travel plans. He extends an invitation to Hench to study his personal papers.

Letter from Gustaf E. Lambert to Albert E. Truby January 18, 1946

Lambert expresses great disappointment for the lack of recognition, in Truby's book, of his work at the yellow fever camp.

Letter from Jefferson Randolph Kean to Philip Showalter Hench January 26, 1946

Kean encloses a clipping of Lazear's obituary and thinks it may be of value to Hench.

Questionnaire for Jefferson Randolph Kean April 1946

Hench lists questions he has for Kean.

Jefferson Randolph Kean's answers for a questionnaire from Philip Showalter Hench May 11, 1946

Kean discusses the Yellow Fever Commission, in response to Hench's questionnaire.

Jefferson Randolph Kean's answers for a questionnaire from Philip Showalter Hench May 25, 1946

Kean discusses the Yellow Fever Commission, in response to Hench's questionnaire.

Philip Showalter Hench's questions for Jefferson Randolph Kean and Kean's answers June 5, 1946

Letter from Lillie W. Franck to Philip Showalter Hench June 20, 1946

Franck informs Hench that she has mailed the original interview of Kean by Hench to Kean.

Letter from Lillie W. Franck to Jefferson Randolph Kean June 17, 1946

Franck asks Kean to correct the enclosed copy of his answers to earlier questions, sign his name, and mail it to Hench. Kean adds a note to Hench, dated June 19, 1946, in which he recalls a portrait which was done of himself.

Transcript of Philip Showalter Hench's interview of Jefferson Randolph Kean June 5, 1946

Kean provides his recollections of the Yellow Fever Commission, in response to Hench's questions.

Philip Showalter Hench's interview with Jefferson Randolph Kean November 19, 1946

Hench interviews Kean about the Yellow Fever Commission.

Philip Showalter Hench's questions for Albert E. Truby December 1946

Philip Showalter Hench's questions for Albert E. Truby concerning Truby's book December 1946

Hench provides as outline of questions for Truby about his book, “Memoir of Walter Reed.” Responses by both Truby and Hench are included for some of the questions.

Philip Showalter Hench's miscellaneous questions for Albert E. Truby December 1946

Hench provides an outline of miscellaneous questions for Truby about the yellow fever investigation. Responses by both Truby and Hench are included for some of the questions.

Albert E. Truby's answers for a questionnaire from Philip Showalter Hench concerning Truby's book December 1946-February 1947

Albert E. Truby's answers for a questionnaire from Philip Showalter Hench concerning Truby's book February 1947

Truby adds more information to the answers he supplied for Hench's questionnaire. Truby believes Lambert is trying to discredit him because he didn't support the inclusion of Lambert and Ames on the Yellow Fever Roll of Honor.

Correspondence of Albert E. Truby, Jefferson Randolph Kean, and Philip Showalter Hench 1947-1948

Letter from Albert E. Truby to Philip Showalter Hench January 14, 1947

Truby tries to figure out from a photograph the exact room in which Reed died in Washington, D.C. Knowing that the Lazear notebook would answer very important questions regarding Reed's Preliminary Report, he also discusses various ways to get it from the Carroll family.

Letter from Philip Showalter Hench to Gustaf E. Lambert January 20, 1947

Hench attempts to resolve the differences of memory between the yellow fever experiment survivors. The number of buildings in the yellow fever section is in question and the camp's exact location is unclear.

Letter from Jefferson Randolph Kean to Philip Showalter Hench January 27, 1947

Kean sends Hench letters (not included) from Finlay and gives Hench a very positive description of Guiteras.

Correspondence of Albert E. Truby, Jefferson Randolph Kean, and Philip Showalter Hench 1949-1950

Letter from Albert E. Truby to Philip Showalter Hench February 17, 1949

Truby congratulates Hench for his work in “that most terrible of all crippling diseases,” and asks him to help block the effort of Senator Lucas to have Gustaf E. Lambert admitted to the Yellow Fever Roll of Honor. He also states that Jernegan was the bravest volunteer.

Letter from Philip Showalter Hench to Jefferson Randolph Kean and Albert E. Truby August 16, 1949

Hench explains to Kean and Truby that he has been so occupied with cortisone research that he has had no time for his Reed project. He has accepted the position of chairman of a research committee on rheumatic diseases.

Letter from Paul L. Tate to [Philip Showalter Hench] September 25, 1949

Tate informs [Hench] that he was the medical records clerk at Columbia Barracks during the yellow fever experiments. He claims that Ames was the real hero and yet became the forgotten man because he was simply a contract doctor.

The Annual Report of the Monticello Association 1950

The report contains a memorial to Jefferson Randolph Kean.

Correspondence of Albert E. Truby, Jefferson Randolph Kean, and Philip Showalter Hench 1951-1952

Letter from Cornelia Knox Kean to Philip Showalter Hench May 4, 1951

Kean writes Hench about her interactions with Standlee who is writing a biography of Reed. She encloses a copy of the letter she sent to Standlee, critiquing Standlee's manuscript. She mentions that Love is not happy with the way Standlee is writing of Reed.

Letter from Cornelia Knox Kean to Mary Standlee May 4, 1951

Kean harshly criticizes Standlee's manuscript and states the reasons for her opinions. She includes a detailed list of corrections for the Standlee manuscript.

Letter from Albert E. Truby to Philip Showalter Hench May 26, 1951

Truby is extremely critical of Standlee's manuscript, and believes that she is not competent to write an accurate account. He encloses a copy of his letter to her.

The Scientific Experiments in Cuba in 1900-1901 by the Walter Reed Board with Special Emphasis on the Cost of the Experiments to the United States Government July 1, 1953

Truby, by examining the stubs of the checkbook used to disburse funds at Camp Lazear, analyzes the cost of the yellow fever experiments. He produces a figure of $6,500.

Correspondence of Albert E. Truby, Jefferson Randolph Kean, and Philip Showalter Hench 1953-1955

Letter from Albert E. Truby to Philip Showalter Hench January 30, 1953

Truby discusses the Camp Lazear National Monument and Nogueira's efforts in establishing the monument. Truby expresses his displeasure at the inaccuracies in an article about “Finlay Field.”

Letter from Philip Showalter Hench to Albert E. Truby February 20, 1953

Hench inquires if it would be possible to determine the cost to the U.S. Army of the entire Yellow Fever Commission, beyond the regular pay of those involved.

Letter from Albert E. Truby to Philip Showalter Hench March 5, 1953

Truby agrees to work on an estimate of the cost of the Yellow Fever Commission expenses.

Sanitary work in Cuba a lecture by Jefferson Randolph Kean with notes by Albert E. Truby May 2, 1910

[Kean] gives a brief summary of conditions in Cuba before the arrival of the Yellow Fever Board. He provides an account of the activities of the Board, which ultimately shows the mosquito as the bearer of yellow fever. Included are notes by Truby.

"I Became a Guinea Pig" an episode from Big Moments in a Little Life circa 1940-1955

Andrus describes the work of the Yellow Fever Board and his role as a volunteer. He provides exacting lists of his fellow volunteers and their cases of yellow fever.

Miscellaneous notes and correspondence circa 1900-1960

A.S. Pinto's recollections of the yellow fever experiments circa 1900-1960

Pinto describes Reed's use of mosquitoes acquired from Finlay and the first experiments with volunteers.

Notes of [Philip Showalter Hench] circa 1930-1960

[Hench] outlines details of the yellow fever investigation, including a diagram of the Board's laboratory at Columbia Barracks.

Letter from D.S. Lamb to Jefferson Randolph Kean October 19, 1927

The letter concerns Lamb's recollection of Walter Reed's last days.