Item Details

God's Own Ethics [electronic resource]: Norms of Divine Agency and the Argument From Evil

Mark C. Murphy
Format
EBook; Book; Online
Published
Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2017.
Edition
First edition
Language
English
ISBN
0198796919, 9780198796916
Summary
Every version of the argument from evil requires a premise concerning God's motivation - about the actions that God is motivated to perform or the states of affairs that God is motivated to bring about. The typical source of this premise is a conviction that God is, obviously, morally perfect, where God's moral perfection consists in God's being motivated to act in accordance with the norms of morality by which both we and God are governed. The aim of 'God's own ethics' is to challenge this understanding by giving arguments against this view of God as morally perfect and by offering an alternative account of what God's own ethics is like. According to this alternative account, God is in no way required to promote the well-being of sentient creatures, though God may rationally do so. Any norms of conduct that favor the promotion of creaturely well-being that govern God's conduct are norms that are contingently self-imposed by God. This revised understanding of divine ethics should lead us to revise sharply downward our assessment of the force of the argument from evil while leaving intact our conception of God as an absolutely perfect being, supremely worthy of worship.
Contents
  • Part I. The ethics of an Anselmian being
  • Anselmianism about God
  • Is the Anselmian being loving?
  • Is the Anselmian being morally good?
  • The ethics of the Anselmian being I (promotion)
  • The ethics of the Anselmian being II (respect)
  • The argument from evil and the ethics of the Anselmian being
  • Part II. God's ethics
  • Worship-worthiness and allegiance-worthiness
  • The good of religion and contingent divine ethics
  • The argument from evil and God's contingent ethics.
Description
Mode of access: World wide Web.
Notes
Includes bibliographical references (pages 199-205) and index.
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Technical Details

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    a| Part I. The ethics of an Anselmian being -- Anselmianism about God -- Is the Anselmian being loving? -- Is the Anselmian being morally good? -- The ethics of the Anselmian being I (promotion) -- The ethics of the Anselmian being II (respect) -- The argument from evil and the ethics of the Anselmian being -- Part II. God's ethics -- Worship-worthiness and allegiance-worthiness -- The good of religion and contingent divine ethics -- The argument from evil and God's contingent ethics.
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