Item Details

Print View

Evolution of the Cerebellar Sense of Self [electronic resource]

John Montgomery, University of Auckland, New Zealand, David Bodznick, Wesleyan University, Connecticut, United States of America
Format
EBook; Book; Online
Published
Oxford, United Kingdom : Oxford University Press, 2016.
Edition
First edition
Language
English
ISBN
9780198758860, 0198758863
Summary
The cerebellum is an intriguing component of the brain. In humans it occupies only 10% of the brain volume, yet has approximately 69 billion neurons; that is 80% of the nerve cells in the brain. The cerebellum first arose in jawed vertebrates such as sharks, and sharks in fact have an additional cerebellum-like structure that works as an adaptive filter. The function of shark cerebellum-like structures is to discriminate 'self' from 'other' in sensory inputs. With the evolution of the true cerebellum the adaptive filter functionality was adopted for motor control and paved the way for athleticism and movement finesse that we see in swimming, running, climbing and flying vertebrates. This book uses an evolutionary perspective to open up the exciting body of work that is cerebellar research to a wide audience. Understanding the brain is of interest to many people, from many different backgrounds, and for many different reasons. Therefore, understanding cerebellum is a significant step towards the wider challenge of understanding the brain.
Contents
  • Introduction to the cerebellar sense of self
  • Cerebellar sense of self and sense of agency
  • Cerebellum as a neuronal machine : the cerebellar 'chip'
  • Self and other in sensory systems : the cerebellum-like structure in sharks
  • From cerebellum-like to cerebellum : evolution by duplication?
  • How does the cerebellum work? Model systems : compensating for self-movement (vestibulo-ocular reflex), predictive motor learning (eye blink reflex), voluntary goal-directed behaviour (saccades), and action and reaction
  • Adaptive filter as the basis for cerebellar function and versatility
  • A history of cerebellum research : science, scientists, and the competition of ideas and evidence
  • Learning from the cerebellum : applications for rehabilitation, sports, and technology
  • General conclusion.
Description
Mode of access: World wide Web.
Notes
Includes bibliographical references and index.
Copyright Not EvaluatedCopyright Not Evaluated
Technical Details
  • Access in Virgo Classic
  • Staff View

    LEADER 03398nam a2200421 i 4500
    001 u7235819
    003 SIRSI
    005 20170909041908.0
    006 m d
    007 cr n
    008 160826t20162016enka sb 001 0 eng d
    010
      
      
    a| 2016952421
    016
    7
      
    a| 101704232 2| DNLM
    020
      
      
    a| 9780198758860
    020
      
      
    a| 0198758863
    035
      
      
    a| (WaSeSS)ssj0001818377
    040
      
      
    a| YDXCP b| eng c| YDXCP d| ERASA d| BTCTA d| NLE d| OCLCO d| UZ0 d| OCLCF d| YDX d| OCLCO d| WLU d| OCLCO d| LML d| ORU d| OCLCO d| L2U d| OCLCO d| OBE d| NLM d| OCLCO d| UCW d| DLC d| WaSeSS
    042
      
      
    a| pcc
    050
    0
    0
    a| QP379 b| .M66 2016
    060
    0
    0
    a| 2017 C-638
    060
    1
    0
    a| WL 320
    082
    0
    0
    a| 612.8/27 2| 23
    100
    1
      
    a| Montgomery, John C., d| 1952-
    245
    1
    0
    a| Evolution of the cerebellar sense of self h| [electronic resource] / c| John Montgomery, University of Auckland, New Zealand, David Bodznick, Wesleyan University, Connecticut, United States of America.
    250
      
      
    a| First edition.
    260
      
      
    a| Oxford, United Kingdom : b| Oxford University Press, c| 2016.
    504
      
      
    a| Includes bibliographical references and index.
    505
    0
      
    a| Introduction to the cerebellar sense of self -- Cerebellar sense of self and sense of agency -- Cerebellum as a neuronal machine : the cerebellar 'chip' -- Self and other in sensory systems : the cerebellum-like structure in sharks -- From cerebellum-like to cerebellum : evolution by duplication? -- How does the cerebellum work? Model systems : compensating for self-movement (vestibulo-ocular reflex), predictive motor learning (eye blink reflex), voluntary goal-directed behaviour (saccades), and action and reaction -- Adaptive filter as the basis for cerebellar function and versatility -- A history of cerebellum research : science, scientists, and the competition of ideas and evidence -- Learning from the cerebellum : applications for rehabilitation, sports, and technology -- General conclusion.
    520
    8
      
    a| The cerebellum is an intriguing component of the brain. In humans it occupies only 10% of the brain volume, yet has approximately 69 billion neurons; that is 80% of the nerve cells in the brain. The cerebellum first arose in jawed vertebrates such as sharks, and sharks in fact have an additional cerebellum-like structure that works as an adaptive filter. The function of shark cerebellum-like structures is to discriminate 'self' from 'other' in sensory inputs. With the evolution of the true cerebellum the adaptive filter functionality was adopted for motor control and paved the way for athleticism and movement finesse that we see in swimming, running, climbing and flying vertebrates. This book uses an evolutionary perspective to open up the exciting body of work that is cerebellar research to a wide audience. Understanding the brain is of interest to many people, from many different backgrounds, and for many different reasons. Therefore, understanding cerebellum is a significant step towards the wider challenge of understanding the brain.
    538
      
      
    a| Mode of access: World wide Web.
    650
      
    0
    a| Cerebellum.
    650
    1
    2
    a| Cerebellum.
    655
      
    0
    a| Electronic books.
    700
    1
      
    a| Bodznick, David.
    710
    2
      
    a| Oxford Scholarship Online - VIVA
    856
    4
    0
    u| http://RE5QY4SB7X.search.serialssolutions.com/?V=1.0&L=RE5QY4SB7X&S=JCs&C=TC0001818377&T=marc
    596
      
      
    a| 1
    999
      
      
    a| XX(7235819.1) w| WEB i| 7235819-1001 l| INTERNET m| UVA-LIB t| INTERNET
▾See more
▴See less

Availability

Google Preview

Google Books Preview

Read Online