Item Details

Global Engineering Ethics

Heinz C. Luegenbiehl, Rockwell F. Clancy
Format
Book
Published
Kidlington, Oxford, United Kingdom : Butterworth-Heinemann, an imprint of Elsevier, [2017]
Language
English
ISBN
9780128112182, 0128112182
Contents
  • Note continued: 9.7. Engineers and Whistle-Blowing
  • 9.7.1. Criteria for Whistle-Blowing
  • Case Study Three Case of George Kirin
  • Exercise Two Case of John's Friendship (Part Two)
  • 9.8. Summary
  • Review Questions
  • References
  • 10. Issues of Broader Concern for Engineers
  • Case Study One Engineering and Public Knowledge: The "Pregnancy" Mode on Qihoo 360's P1 Wireless Router
  • Exercise One Engineering and Public Knowledge (Part One)
  • 10.1. Engineering and Society: Positive Contributions
  • 10.1.1. Two Cultures View
  • 10.1.2. Traditional Versus Superculture View
  • 10.2. Relation of Engineers to the Public: Principles of Involvement
  • 10.2.1. Principle of Public Participation: Engineers Should Seriously Consider Participating in Public Policy Discussions Regarding Future Applications of Technology
  • 10.2.2. Principle of Public Education: Engineers Should Seriously Consider Helping the Public to Understand the Applications of Technologies in Broader Social, Global Contexts
  • 10.2.3. Principle of Engineering Engagement: Engineers Should Seriously Consider Becoming Involved in Helping to Improve the Technological Futures of Those Less Fortunate Than Themselves, on a Voluntary Basis
  • 10.3. Ethics and the Law: Their Similarities and Differences
  • 10.4. Engineers and Laws, Internationally and Cross-Culturally
  • Exercise Two Engineering and Public Knowledge (Part Two)
  • Case Study Two Aligning International Responsibility with Local Needs: Engineering Aid Work
  • Exercise Three Aligning International Responsibility with Local Needs
  • 10.5. Summary
  • 11. Rights of Engineers
  • Exercise
  • Sexual Harassment in the Work Place: Joan Mendoza
  • 11.1. Not Only Duties, But Also Rights
  • 11.2. Nature of Rights
  • 11.3. Employee Rights and the Limits of Employers
  • 11.4. Right to Privacy
  • 11.5. Specific Considerations of Discrimination: Racial and Sexual
  • 11.6. Employee Rights, in General
  • 11.7. Rights of Engineers, Specifically
  • 11.8. Another Right: Intellectual Property
  • 11.9. Enforcement of Rights
  • 11.10. Summary
  • References.
  • Machine generated contents note: 1. Introduction: Engineering Ethics from a Global Perspective
  • Case Study One Uberlingen Midair Collision: Systems Conflicts and Global Contexts
  • 1.1. What's Changed and Why it Matters: Initial Assumptions
  • 1.2. What is Ethics?
  • 1.3. Why Ethics for Engineers?
  • 1.4. A Global Perspective
  • 1.5. Foundations for the Analysis of Ethical Issues
  • 1.5.1. Problems of Theory: Theoretical and Cross-Cultural Disagreements
  • 1.5.2. Role of Reason: Its Universality and in Engineering
  • 1.5.3. Role Responsibilities: Special Duties
  • 1.5.4. Consideration of Cases
  • 1.6. Preview: What's to Come...
  • Case Study Two Engineering a Better Global Future: Fusion Power Across Borders
  • 1.7. Summary
  • 2. Working With Cases: The Importance of Concrete Learning
  • 2.1. Case Studies
  • 2.2. Why Study Cases?
  • 2.3. Steps for Case Analysis
  • 2.3.1. Identifying Ethical Issues
  • 2.3.2. Narrowing the Focus
  • 2.3.3. Determining Relevant Facts
  • 2.3.4. Making Reasonable Assumptions
  • 2.3.5. Undertaking Definitional Clarification
  • 2.3.6. Conducting Ethical Analysis
  • 2.3.7. Reviewing the Process
  • 2.3.8. Resolving the Issue
  • 2.3.9. Identifying Practical Constraints
  • 2.3.10. Avoiding Ethical Problems
  • Case Study A Hypothetical Case for Student Analysis: A Heating Unit Defect
  • Analyze Engineering a Better Global Future
  • 2.4. Summary
  • 3. Engineering Professionalism and Professional Organizations
  • Case Study One McDonnell and Miller, and the ASME: Professionalism in Question?
  • McDonnell and Miller, and the ASME
  • 3.1. "Profession": More Than You Might Think
  • 3.2. Three Ways of Defining "Profession"
  • 3.3. Relationship of Professions to Society: The Contract Model
  • 3.4. Characteristics of a Profession
  • 3.5. Relationship of a Profession to the Individual Professional
  • 3.5.1. Engineering as a Profession
  • 3.6. Professional Organizations
  • 3.6.1. Professional Organizations and Codes of Ethics: Some Examples
  • 3.6.2. A Short History of Codes of Ethics
  • 3.6.3. Contents of Codes of Ethics: ASME as an Example
  • Case Study Two Global Professionalism? China and India
  • 3.7. Summary
  • Further Reading
  • 4. Basic Ethical Principles for Global Engineering
  • Case Study One Ford and Firestone/Bridgestone: Responses to Technological Failures
  • Exercise One Ford and Firestone/Bridgestone (Part One)
  • 4.1. Principles Explained: Engineering and Justification
  • 4.2. Justification of the Principles: Engineering Activities
  • 4.3. Nature of Engineering: Value, Artifacts, and Design
  • 4.4. Deriving the Principles
  • 4.5. Introduction to the Principles: Based on Public Safety
  • 4.5.1. Public Safety: Engineers Should Endeavor, Based on Their Expertise, to Keep Members of the Public Safe From Serious Negative Consequences Resulting From Their Development and Implementation of Technology
  • 4.5.2. Human Rights: As a Result of Their Work With Technology, Engineers Should Endeavor to Ensure That Fundamental Human Rights are Not Negatively Impacted
  • 4.5.3. Environmental Protection: Engineers Should Endeavor to Avoid Damage to the Environment and Living Beings That Would Result in Serious Negative Consequences, Including Long-Term Ones, to Human Life
  • 4.5.4. Competent Performance: Engineers Should Endeavor to Engage Only in Engineering Activities They are Competent to Carry Out
  • 4.5.5. Engineering Decisions: Engineers Should Endeavor to Base Their Engineering Decisions on Scientific Principles and Mathematical Analyses, and Seek to Avoid the Influence of Extraneous Factors
  • 4.5.6. Truthful Disclosure: Engineers Should Endeavor to Keep the Public Informed of Their Decisions, Which Have the Potential to Seriously Affect the Public, and to be Truthful and Complete in Their Disclosures
  • Exercise Two Ford and Firestone/Bridgestone (Part Two)
  • Case Study Two Development and its Broader Contexts: Coal Mining and Energy, and the West-East Pipeline in China
  • Exercise Three Development and its Broader Contexts
  • 4.6. Summary
  • 5. Prime Responsibility of Safety
  • Case Study One How Safe is Safe?: The Case of Hurricane Katrina
  • Exercise One How Safe is Safe? (Part One)
  • 5.1. Safety: A Special Concern for Engineers
  • Engineering as "Social Experimentation"
  • 5.2. Nature of Safety: Objective and Subjective
  • 5.3. Connection of Safety With Other Responsibilities
  • Exercise Two How Safe is Safe? (Part Two)
  • Case Study Two Uber Rape Scandal: User Safety and the Responsibilities of Technology Firms in Global Contexts
  • Exercise Three Uber Rape Scandal
  • 5.4. Summary
  • 6. Global Business Environment: What Engineers Should Know
  • Case Study One When Business and Politics Collide: The Case of Toshiba Machine Tools
  • Exercise One Case of Toshiba Machine Tools (Part One)
  • 6.1. Engineering and Business Environments
  • 6.2. Nature of Business
  • 6.3. Role of Ethics in Business
  • 6.4. Ethical Principles for Business: Their Differences from Engineering Ethics
  • 6.5. Organizational Ethical Principles
  • 6.5.1. Corporations and Harms: Through Their Actions, Corporations Should Endeavor to Avoid Producing Unnecessary Harms to Those in and Outside of Their Organizations
  • 6.5.2. Corporations and Fairness: Corporations Should Endeavor to Ensure That All Stakeholders of Their Organizations are Treated Fairly and Justly
  • 6.5.3. Corporations and Laws: Corporations Should Endeavor to Ensure That All Relevant Laws and Regulations are Followed Within Their Organizations
  • 6.5.4. Corporations and Discrimination: Corporations Should Endeavor to Protect Members of Their Organizations Against Internal Discrimination and Harassment
  • 6.5.5. Corporations and Compensation: Corporations Should Endeavor to Make All Hiring, Compensation, Promotion, and Termination Decisions Based on Merit
  • 6.5.6. Corporations and Contracts: Corporations Should Endeavor to Ensure That All Legitimate Corporate Contracts are Upheld
  • 6.6. Ethical Principles for Employees
  • 6.6.1. Employees and Directives: Corporate Employees Should Endeavor to Obey All Legitimate, Job-Related Directives
  • 6.6.2. Employees and Performance: Corporate Employees Should Endeavor to Perform Their Contracted Duties on at Least an Industry-Standard Level
  • 6.6.3. Employers and Confidentiality: Corporate Employees Should Uphold the Principle of Confidentiality in Relation to Knowledge Gained in Present and Past Employment
  • 6.6.4. Employees and Harm: Corporate Employees Should Endeavor to Avoid Actions That Harm the Corporation in Acting on Behalf of the Organization
  • 6.6.5. Employees and Honesty: Corporate Employees Should Endeavor to be Honest in Their Business Relationships With Others
  • 6.6.6. Employees and Ethics: Corporate Employees Should Endeavor to Ensure That, When in Positions of Authority, They Enforce All Organizational and Employee Ethical Principles
  • 6.7. Engineering in the Context of Business
  • 6.8. Business and Engineering Ethics: Points of Convergence Rather Than Conflict
  • 6.9. Potentials for Conflicting Duties: Points of Conflict Rather Than Convergence
  • Exercise Two Case of Toshiba Machine Tools (Part Two)
  • Case Study Two Volkswagen, International Business, and the Environment
  • Exercise Three Volkswagen, International Business, and the Environment
  • 6.10. Summary
  • 7. Cross-Cultural Issues: Their Importance to Global Engineering Ethics
  • Case Study
  • Bid-Rigging in Japan: An Ethical or Cultural Issue?
  • Exercise One Bid Rigging in Japan (Part One)
  • 7.1. Importance of Cultural Values Within Engineering
  • 7.2. Normative Ethical Relativism: It's All the Same
  • 7.3. Nature of Values and Cross-Cultural Contexts
  • 7.4. Values and Ethics: Moral and Nonmoral Values
  • 7.5. Values and Engineering Ethics: Two Points to Keep in Mind
  • 7.6. Basic Ethical Principles for Global Engineering: Related to Cross-Cultural Values
  • 7.6.1. Nonmoral Cultural Values: Engineers Should Endeavor to Understand and Respect the Nonmoral Cultural Values of Those They Encounter in Fulfilling Their Engineering Duties
  • 7.6.2. Cultural Values and Ethics: Engineers Should Endeavor to Refuse to Participate in Engineering Activities That are Claimed to Reflect Cultural Practices But That Violate Basic Ethical Principles for Global Engineering
  • Exercise Two Bid Rigging in Japan (Part Two)
  • 7.7. Summary
  • 8. Autonomy
  • Exercise One Personal and Professional Autonomy: Your Sick Mother (Part One)
  • 8.1. Autonomy in Engineering
  • 8.2. Autonomy as a Concept
  • 8.3. Autonomy and Engineers
  • 8.4. Personal and Political Versus Professional Autonomy
  • Exercise Two Personal and Professional Autonomy (Part Two)
  • 8.5. Summary
  • 9. Conflicting Duties and Dissent
  • Case Study One Case of John's Friendship
  • Exercise One Case of John's Friendship (Part One)
  • 9.1. Autonomy and Dissent
  • 9.2. Duty of Loyalty: A Special Bond of Identification
  • 9.3. Legitimate Authority of Employers
  • 9.4. Faithful Agency
  • 9.5. Conflicts of Interests
  • Case Study Two Case of Larry Sapporo: Conflicts of Interest?
  • 9.6. Engineers and Dissent
Description
xiv, 208 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm
Notes
Includes bibliographical references and index.
Technical Details
  • Access in Virgo Classic

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    a| Note continued: g| 9.7. t| Engineers and Whistle-Blowing -- g| 9.7.1. t| Criteria for Whistle-Blowing -- g| Case Study Three t| Case of George Kirin -- g| Exercise Two t| Case of John's Friendship (Part Two) -- g| 9.8. t| Summary -- t| Review Questions -- t| References -- g| 10. t| Issues of Broader Concern for Engineers -- g| Case Study One t| Engineering and Public Knowledge: The "Pregnancy" Mode on Qihoo 360's P1 Wireless Router -- g| Exercise One t| Engineering and Public Knowledge (Part One) -- g| 10.1. t| Engineering and Society: Positive Contributions -- g| 10.1.1. t| Two Cultures View -- g| 10.1.2. t| Traditional Versus Superculture View -- g| 10.2. t| Relation of Engineers to the Public: Principles of Involvement -- g| 10.2.1. t| Principle of Public Participation: Engineers Should Seriously Consider Participating in Public Policy Discussions Regarding Future Applications of Technology -- g| 10.2.2. t| Principle of Public Education: Engineers Should Seriously Consider Helping the Public to Understand the Applications of Technologies in Broader Social, Global Contexts -- g| 10.2.3. t| Principle of Engineering Engagement: Engineers Should Seriously Consider Becoming Involved in Helping to Improve the Technological Futures of Those Less Fortunate Than Themselves, on a Voluntary Basis -- g| 10.3. t| Ethics and the Law: Their Similarities and Differences -- g| 10.4. t| Engineers and Laws, Internationally and Cross-Culturally -- g| Exercise Two t| Engineering and Public Knowledge (Part Two) -- g| Case Study Two t| Aligning International Responsibility with Local Needs: Engineering Aid Work -- g| Exercise Three t| Aligning International Responsibility with Local Needs -- g| 10.5. t| Summary -- t| Review Questions -- t| References -- g| 11. t| Rights of Engineers -- t| Exercise -- Sexual Harassment in the Work Place: Joan Mendoza -- g| 11.1. t| Not Only Duties, But Also Rights -- g| 11.2. t| Nature of Rights -- g| 11.3. t| Employee Rights and the Limits of Employers -- g| 11.4. t| Right to Privacy -- g| 11.5. t| Specific Considerations of Discrimination: Racial and Sexual -- g| 11.6. t| Employee Rights, in General -- g| 11.7. t| Rights of Engineers, Specifically -- g| 11.8. t| Another Right: Intellectual Property -- g| 11.9. t| Enforcement of Rights -- g| 11.10. t| Summary -- t| Review Questions -- t| References.
    505
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    0
    a| Machine generated contents note: g| 1. t| Introduction: Engineering Ethics from a Global Perspective -- g| Case Study One t| Uberlingen Midair Collision: Systems Conflicts and Global Contexts -- g| 1.1. t| What's Changed and Why it Matters: Initial Assumptions -- g| 1.2. t| What is Ethics? -- g| 1.3. t| Why Ethics for Engineers? -- g| 1.4. t| A Global Perspective -- g| 1.5. t| Foundations for the Analysis of Ethical Issues -- g| 1.5.1. t| Problems of Theory: Theoretical and Cross-Cultural Disagreements -- g| 1.5.2. t| Role of Reason: Its Universality and in Engineering -- g| 1.5.3. t| Role Responsibilities: Special Duties -- g| 1.5.4. t| Consideration of Cases -- g| 1.6. t| Preview: What's to Come... -- g| Case Study Two t| Engineering a Better Global Future: Fusion Power Across Borders -- g| 1.7. t| Summary -- t| Review Questions -- t| References -- g| 2. t| Working With Cases: The Importance of Concrete Learning -- g| 2.1. t| Case Studies -- g| 2.2. t| Why Study Cases? -- g| 2.3. t| Steps for Case Analysis -- g| 2.3.1. t| Identifying Ethical Issues -- g| 2.3.2. t| Narrowing the Focus -- g| 2.3.3. t| Determining Relevant Facts -- g| 2.3.4. t| Making Reasonable Assumptions -- g| 2.3.5. t| Undertaking Definitional Clarification -- g| 2.3.6. t| Conducting Ethical Analysis -- g| 2.3.7. t| Reviewing the Process -- g| 2.3.8. t| Resolving the Issue -- g| 2.3.9. t| Identifying Practical Constraints -- g| 2.3.10. t| Avoiding Ethical Problems -- g| Case Study t| A Hypothetical Case for Student Analysis: A Heating Unit Defect -- t| Exercise -- Analyze Engineering a Better Global Future -- g| 2.4. t| Summary -- t| Review Questions -- t| References -- g| 3. t| Engineering Professionalism and Professional Organizations -- g| Case Study One t| McDonnell and Miller, and the ASME: Professionalism in Question? -- t| Exercise -- McDonnell and Miller, and the ASME -- g| 3.1. t| "Profession": More Than You Might Think -- g| 3.2. t| Three Ways of Defining "Profession" -- g| 3.3. t| Relationship of Professions to Society: The Contract Model -- g| 3.4. t| Characteristics of a Profession -- g| 3.5. t| Relationship of a Profession to the Individual Professional -- g| 3.5.1. t| Engineering as a Profession -- g| 3.6. t| Professional Organizations -- g| 3.6.1. t| Professional Organizations and Codes of Ethics: Some Examples -- g| 3.6.2. t| A Short History of Codes of Ethics -- g| 3.6.3. t| Contents of Codes of Ethics: ASME as an Example -- g| Case Study Two t| Global Professionalism? China and India -- g| 3.7. t| Summary -- t| Review Questions -- t| References -- t| Further Reading -- g| 4. t| Basic Ethical Principles for Global Engineering -- g| Case Study One t| Ford and Firestone/Bridgestone: Responses to Technological Failures -- g| Exercise One t| Ford and Firestone/Bridgestone (Part One) -- g| 4.1. t| Principles Explained: Engineering and Justification -- g| 4.2. t| Justification of the Principles: Engineering Activities -- g| 4.3. t| Nature of Engineering: Value, Artifacts, and Design -- g| 4.4. t| Deriving the Principles -- g| 4.5. t| Introduction to the Principles: Based on Public Safety -- g| 4.5.1. t| Public Safety: Engineers Should Endeavor, Based on Their Expertise, to Keep Members of the Public Safe From Serious Negative Consequences Resulting From Their Development and Implementation of Technology -- g| 4.5.2. t| Human Rights: As a Result of Their Work With Technology, Engineers Should Endeavor to Ensure That Fundamental Human Rights are Not Negatively Impacted -- g| 4.5.3. t| Environmental Protection: Engineers Should Endeavor to Avoid Damage to the Environment and Living Beings That Would Result in Serious Negative Consequences, Including Long-Term Ones, to Human Life -- g| 4.5.4. t| Competent Performance: Engineers Should Endeavor to Engage Only in Engineering Activities They are Competent to Carry Out -- g| 4.5.5. t| Engineering Decisions: Engineers Should Endeavor to Base Their Engineering Decisions on Scientific Principles and Mathematical Analyses, and Seek to Avoid the Influence of Extraneous Factors -- g| 4.5.6. t| Truthful Disclosure: Engineers Should Endeavor to Keep the Public Informed of Their Decisions, Which Have the Potential to Seriously Affect the Public, and to be Truthful and Complete in Their Disclosures -- g| Exercise Two t| Ford and Firestone/Bridgestone (Part Two) -- g| Case Study Two t| Development and its Broader Contexts: Coal Mining and Energy, and the West-East Pipeline in China -- g| Exercise Three t| Development and its Broader Contexts -- g| 4.6. t| Summary -- t| Review Questions -- t| References -- g| 5. t| Prime Responsibility of Safety -- g| Case Study One t| How Safe is Safe?: The Case of Hurricane Katrina -- g| Exercise One t| How Safe is Safe? (Part One) -- g| 5.1. t| Safety: A Special Concern for Engineers -- Engineering as "Social Experimentation" -- g| 5.2. t| Nature of Safety: Objective and Subjective -- g| 5.3. t| Connection of Safety With Other Responsibilities -- g| Exercise Two t| How Safe is Safe? (Part Two) -- g| Case Study Two t| Uber Rape Scandal: User Safety and the Responsibilities of Technology Firms in Global Contexts -- g| Exercise Three t| Uber Rape Scandal -- g| 5.4. t| Summary -- t| Review Questions -- t| References -- g| 6. t| Global Business Environment: What Engineers Should Know -- g| Case Study One t| When Business and Politics Collide: The Case of Toshiba Machine Tools -- g| Exercise One t| Case of Toshiba Machine Tools (Part One) -- g| 6.1. t| Engineering and Business Environments -- g| 6.2. t| Nature of Business -- g| 6.3. t| Role of Ethics in Business -- g| 6.4. t| Ethical Principles for Business: Their Differences from Engineering Ethics -- g| 6.5. t| Organizational Ethical Principles -- g| 6.5.1. t| Corporations and Harms: Through Their Actions, Corporations Should Endeavor to Avoid Producing Unnecessary Harms to Those in and Outside of Their Organizations -- g| 6.5.2. t| Corporations and Fairness: Corporations Should Endeavor to Ensure That All Stakeholders of Their Organizations are Treated Fairly and Justly -- g| 6.5.3. t| Corporations and Laws: Corporations Should Endeavor to Ensure That All Relevant Laws and Regulations are Followed Within Their Organizations -- g| 6.5.4. t| Corporations and Discrimination: Corporations Should Endeavor to Protect Members of Their Organizations Against Internal Discrimination and Harassment -- g| 6.5.5. t| Corporations and Compensation: Corporations Should Endeavor to Make All Hiring, Compensation, Promotion, and Termination Decisions Based on Merit -- g| 6.5.6. t| Corporations and Contracts: Corporations Should Endeavor to Ensure That All Legitimate Corporate Contracts are Upheld -- g| 6.6. t| Ethical Principles for Employees -- g| 6.6.1. t| Employees and Directives: Corporate Employees Should Endeavor to Obey All Legitimate, Job-Related Directives -- g| 6.6.2. t| Employees and Performance: Corporate Employees Should Endeavor to Perform Their Contracted Duties on at Least an Industry-Standard Level -- g| 6.6.3. t| Employers and Confidentiality: Corporate Employees Should Uphold the Principle of Confidentiality in Relation to Knowledge Gained in Present and Past Employment -- g| 6.6.4. t| Employees and Harm: Corporate Employees Should Endeavor to Avoid Actions That Harm the Corporation in Acting on Behalf of the Organization -- g| 6.6.5. t| Employees and Honesty: Corporate Employees Should Endeavor to be Honest in Their Business Relationships With Others -- g| 6.6.6. t| Employees and Ethics: Corporate Employees Should Endeavor to Ensure That, When in Positions of Authority, They Enforce All Organizational and Employee Ethical Principles -- g| 6.7. t| Engineering in the Context of Business -- g| 6.8. t| Business and Engineering Ethics: Points of Convergence Rather Than Conflict -- g| 6.9. t| Potentials for Conflicting Duties: Points of Conflict Rather Than Convergence -- g| Exercise Two t| Case of Toshiba Machine Tools (Part Two) -- g| Case Study Two t| Volkswagen, International Business, and the Environment -- g| Exercise Three t| Volkswagen, International Business, and the Environment -- g| 6.10. t| Summary -- t| Review Questions -- t| References -- t| Further Reading -- g| 7. t| Cross-Cultural Issues: Their Importance to Global Engineering Ethics -- t| Case Study -- Bid-Rigging in Japan: An Ethical or Cultural Issue? -- g| Exercise One t| Bid Rigging in Japan (Part One) -- g| 7.1. t| Importance of Cultural Values Within Engineering -- g| 7.2. t| Normative Ethical Relativism: It's All the Same -- g| 7.3. t| Nature of Values and Cross-Cultural Contexts -- g| 7.4. t| Values and Ethics: Moral and Nonmoral Values -- g| 7.5. t| Values and Engineering Ethics: Two Points to Keep in Mind -- g| 7.6. t| Basic Ethical Principles for Global Engineering: Related to Cross-Cultural Values -- g| 7.6.1. t| Nonmoral Cultural Values: Engineers Should Endeavor to Understand and Respect the Nonmoral Cultural Values of Those They Encounter in Fulfilling Their Engineering Duties -- g| 7.6.2. t| Cultural Values and Ethics: Engineers Should Endeavor to Refuse to Participate in Engineering Activities That are Claimed to Reflect Cultural Practices But That Violate Basic Ethical Principles for Global Engineering -- g| Exercise Two t| Bid Rigging in Japan (Part Two) -- g| 7.7. t| Summary -- t| Review Questions -- t| References -- g| 8. t| Autonomy -- g| Exercise One t| Personal and Professional Autonomy: Your Sick Mother (Part One) -- g| 8.1. t| Autonomy in Engineering -- g| 8.2. t| Autonomy as a Concept -- g| 8.3. t| Autonomy and Engineers -- g| 8.4. t| Personal and Political Versus Professional Autonomy -- g| Exercise Two t| Personal and Professional Autonomy (Part Two) -- g| 8.5. t| Summary -- t| Review Questions -- t| References -- g| 9. t| Conflicting Duties and Dissent -- g| Case Study One t| Case of John's Friendship -- g| Exercise One t| Case of John's Friendship (Part One) -- g| 9.1. t| Autonomy and Dissent -- g| 9.2. t| Duty of Loyalty: A Special Bond of Identification -- g| 9.3. t| Legitimate Authority of Employers -- g| 9.4. t| Faithful Agency -- g| 9.5. t| Conflicts of Interests -- g| Case Study Two t| Case of Larry Sapporo: Conflicts of Interest? -- g| 9.6. t| Engineers and Dissent
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