Item Details

Salafism in Jordan: Political Islam in a Quietist Community

Joas Wagemakers (Utrecht University)
Format
Book
Published
Cambridge, United Kingdom : Cambridge University Press, 2016.
Language
English
ISBN
9781107163669, 1107163668
Summary
"The radical trend within Salafism in Jordan has thus been analysed in quite a number of publications. This should probably in part be seen in the context of the increased interest in Salafism from a security perspective, particularly after the terrorist attacks of 11 September 2001 ("9/11"). Given the importance of al-Zarqawi, al-Maqdisi and Abu Qatada al-Filastini to groups such as al-Qa?ida, it is perhaps not surprising that a lot has been written about them, although at least some of these publications were motivated by a clear interest in ideology, not terrorism. In any case, the more widespread, more popular and more peaceful trends within Salafism in Jordan have received nowhere near this amount of attention. Pioneering work has been done on the subject by Wiktorowicz. Yet although his publications should be credited as seminal at a time when much of the world had never even heard of Salafism, they are sometimes slightly ill-informed - Wiktorowicz refers to al-Albani as "al-Bani", for example, which suggests he does not realise the shaykh's Albanian origins - somewhat shallow according to today's standards and quite dated. This last point is particularly the case as so much has happened to the Salafi community in Jordan since the late 1990s, when Wiktorowicz did his research, as we will see later on"--
Description
xii, 300 pages ; 24 cm
Notes
Includes bibliographical references (pages 244-288) and index.
Technical Details
  • Access in Virgo Classic

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    a| xii, 300 pages ; c| 24 cm
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    a| text b| txt 2| rdacontent
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    a| unmediated b| n 2| rdamedia
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    a| Includes bibliographical references (pages 244-288) and index.
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    a| "The radical trend within Salafism in Jordan has thus been analysed in quite a number of publications. This should probably in part be seen in the context of the increased interest in Salafism from a security perspective, particularly after the terrorist attacks of 11 September 2001 ("9/11"). Given the importance of al-Zarqawi, al-Maqdisi and Abu Qatada al-Filastini to groups such as al-Qa?ida, it is perhaps not surprising that a lot has been written about them, although at least some of these publications were motivated by a clear interest in ideology, not terrorism. In any case, the more widespread, more popular and more peaceful trends within Salafism in Jordan have received nowhere near this amount of attention. Pioneering work has been done on the subject by Wiktorowicz. Yet although his publications should be credited as seminal at a time when much of the world had never even heard of Salafism, they are sometimes slightly ill-informed - Wiktorowicz refers to al-Albani as "al-Bani", for example, which suggests he does not realise the shaykh's Albanian origins - somewhat shallow according to today's standards and quite dated. This last point is particularly the case as so much has happened to the Salafi community in Jordan since the late 1990s, when Wiktorowicz did his research, as we will see later on"-- c| Provided by publisher.
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    a| Salafīyah z| Jordan.
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    a| Islamic fundamentalism z| Jordan.
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    a| BP195 .S18 W34 2016 w| LC i| X031795567 l| STACKS m| CLEMONS t| BOOK

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