Item Details

Print View

The New Entrants Problem in International Fisheries Law

Andrew Serdy
Format
Book
Published
Cambridge, United Kingdom ; New York : Cambridge University Press 2016.
Language
English
Series
Cambridge Studies in International and Comparative Law
Cambridge Studies in International and Comparative Law (Cambridge, England : 1996)
ISBN
9781107001565, 1107001560
Summary
"Are international fisheries heading away from a global commons with open access towards a regime of property rights? The distributional implications of denying access to newcomers and re-entrants that used the resource in the past are fraught. Should the winners in this process compensate the losers and, if so, how? Regional fisheries management organisations, in whose gift participatory rights now mostly lie, are increasingly having to deal with this question, which has hitherto been little analysed. This book provides a review of the practice of these bodies and the States that are their members. The recently favoured response of governments, combating 'IUU' - illegal, unregulated and unreported - fishing, is shown to rest on a flawed concept, and the solution might lie less in law than in legal policy: compulsory dispute settlement as an incentive to moderate their claims and an expansion of the possibilities of trading of quotas to make solving the global overcapacity issue easier."--
Contents
  • The bioeconomics of high seas fishing: new entrants and the tragedy of the commons
  • New entrants, old problem: allocation principles in the UN Fish Stocks Agreement and other treaties
  • A wrong turning in international fisheries law: the flawed concept(s) of illegal, unreported and unregulated fishing
  • Case study: new entrants and the Commission for the Conservation of Southern Bluefin Tuna
  • Quota trading in international fisheries commissions: an idea whose time has come?
  • Conclusions: a role for State responsibility?
Description
xxiii, 485 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
Notes
Includes bibliographical references (pages 423-439) and index.
Series Statement
Cambridge studies in international and comparative law ; 111
Cambridge studies in international and comparative law (Cambridge, England : 1996) ; 111
Technical Details
  • Access in Virgo Classic
  • Staff View

    LEADER 02890cam a2200373 i 4500
    001 u6723097
    003 SIRSI
    005 20160427134916.0
    008 160408s2016 enka b 001 0 eng c
    010
      
      
    a| 2016295151
    020
      
      
    a| 9781107001565 q| (hardcover)
    020
      
      
    a| 1107001560 q| (hardcover)
    035
      
      
    a| (OCoLC)944078245
    042
      
      
    a| pcc
    040
      
      
    a| YDXCP b| eng e| rda c| YDXCP d| DLC d| GUL d| BUF d| GUB
    050
    0
    0
    a| K3895 b| .S47 2016
    082
    0
    4
    a| 343.07/692 2| 23
    100
    1
      
    a| Serdy, Andrew, e| author.
    245
    1
    4
    a| The new entrants problem in international fisheries law / c| Andrew Serdy.
    264
      
    1
    a| Cambridge, United Kingdom ; a| New York : b| Cambridge University Press c| 2016.
    300
      
      
    a| xxiii, 485 pages : b| illustrations ; c| 24 cm.
    336
      
      
    a| text b| txt 2| rdacontent
    337
      
      
    a| unmediated b| n 2| rdamedia
    338
      
      
    a| volume b| nc 2| rdacarrier
    490
    1
      
    a| Cambridge studies in international and comparative law ; v| 111
    504
      
      
    a| Includes bibliographical references (pages 423-439) and index.
    505
    0
      
    a| The bioeconomics of high seas fishing: new entrants and the tragedy of the commons -- New entrants, old problem: allocation principles in the UN Fish Stocks Agreement and other treaties -- A wrong turning in international fisheries law: the flawed concept(s) of illegal, unreported and unregulated fishing -- Case study: new entrants and the Commission for the Conservation of Southern Bluefin Tuna -- Quota trading in international fisheries commissions: an idea whose time has come? -- Conclusions: a role for State responsibility?
    520
      
      
    a| "Are international fisheries heading away from a global commons with open access towards a regime of property rights? The distributional implications of denying access to newcomers and re-entrants that used the resource in the past are fraught. Should the winners in this process compensate the losers and, if so, how? Regional fisheries management organisations, in whose gift participatory rights now mostly lie, are increasingly having to deal with this question, which has hitherto been little analysed. This book provides a review of the practice of these bodies and the States that are their members. The recently favoured response of governments, combating 'IUU' - illegal, unregulated and unreported - fishing, is shown to rest on a flawed concept, and the solution might lie less in law than in legal policy: compulsory dispute settlement as an incentive to moderate their claims and an expansion of the possibilities of trading of quotas to make solving the global overcapacity issue easier."-- c| Back cover.
    650
      
    0
    a| Fishery management, International x| Law and legislation.
    830
      
    0
    a| Cambridge studies in international and comparative law (Cambridge, England : 1996) ; v| 111.
    994
      
      
    a| Z0 b| VAL
    596
      
      
    a| 17
    999
      
      
    a| K3895 .S47 2016 w| LC i| 35007008203972 l| STACKS m| LAW t| BOOK
▾See more
▴See less

Availability

Google Preview

Google Books Preview
Library Location Map Availability Call Number
Law Stacks Map Available