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The Oxford Handbook of Islamic Theology

edited by Sabine Schmidtke
Format
Book
Published
Oxford, UK : Oxford University Press, 2016.
Language
English
ISBN
0199696705, 9780199696703
Summary
The Oxford Handbook of Islamic Theology provides a comprehensive and authoritative survey of the current state of the field. It provides a variegated picture of the state of the art and at the same time suggests new directions for future research. Part One covers the various strands of Islamic theology during the formative and early middle periods, rational as well as scripturalist. To demonstrate the continuous interaction among the various theological strands and its repercussions (during the formative and early middle period and beyond), Part Two offers a number of case studies. These focus on specific theological issues that have developed through the dilemmatic and often polemical interactions between the different theological schools and thinkers. Part Three covers Islamic theology during the later middle and early modern periods. One of the characteristics of this period is the growing amalgamation of theology with philosophy (Peripatetic and Illuminationist) and mysticism. Part Four addresses the impact of political and social developments on theology through a number of case studies: the famous miḥna instituted by al-Maʼmūn (r. 189/813-218/833) as well as the miḥna to which Ibn ʼAqīl (d. 769/1367) was subjected; the religious policy of the Almohads; as well as the shifting interpretations throughout history (particularly during Mamluk and Ottoman times) of the relation between Ashʻarism and Māturidism that were often motivated by political motives. Part Five considers Islamic theological thought from the end of the early modern and during the modern period.
Description
xi, 815 pages ; 26 cm
Notes
Includes bibliographical references and index.
Technical Details
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