Item Details

Crucifixion in the Mediterranean World

John Granger Cook
Format
Book
Published
Tübingen, Germany : Mohr Siebeck, 2015.
Edition
Unrevised paperback edition
Language
English
Series
Wissenschaftliche Untersuchungen Zum Neuen Testament
ISBN
9783161537646, 3161537645
Abstract
"To understand the phenomenon of Roman crucifixion, the author argues that one should begin with an investigation of the evidence from Latin texts and inscriptions (such as the lex Puteolana [the law of Puteoli]) supplemented by what may be learned from the surviving archaeological material (e.g., the Arieti fresco of a man on a patibulum [horizontal beam], the Puteoli and Palatine graffiti of crucifixion, the crucifixion nail in the calcaneum bone from Jerusalem, and the Pereire gem of the crucified Jesus [III CE]). This evidence clarifies the precise meaning of terms such as patibulum and crux (vertical beam or cross), which in turn illuminate the Greek terms [e.g.,stauros, stauroo, and anastauroo] and texts that describe crucifixion or penal suspension. It is of fundamental importance that Greek texts be read against the background of Latin texts and Roman historical practice. The author traces the use of the penalty by the Romans until its probable abolition by Constantine and its eventual transformation into the Byzantine punishment by the furca (the fork), a form of penal suspension that resulted in immediate death (a penalty illustrated by the sixth century Vienna Greek codex of Genesis). Cook does not neglect the legal sources -- including the question of the permissibility of the crucifixion of Roman citizens and the crimes for which one could be crucified. In addition to the Latin and Greek authors, texts in Hebrew and Aramaic that refer to penal suspension and crucifixion are examined. Brief attention is given to crucifixion in the Islamic world and to some modern forms of penal suspension including haritsuke (with two photographs), a penalty closely resembling crucifixion that was used in Tokugawan Japan. The material contributes to the understanding of the crucifixion of Jesus and has implications for the theologies of the cross in the New Testament. The relevant ancient images are included"--
Contents
  • Introduction: Crucifixion terminology
  • Crucifixion in Latin texts
  • Roman crucifixions
  • Crucifixion in Greek texts
  • Hebrew and Aramaic texts
  • Crucifixion : law and historical development
  • Roman crucifixion and the New Testament
  • Conclusion: Crucifixion in the Mediterranean world.
Description
xxiv, 522 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
Notes
Includes bibliographical references (pages 467-485) and indexes.
Original Version
Paperback reprint. Originally published in hardcover: Tübingen, Germany : Mohr Siebeck, [2014].
Series Statement
Wissenschaftliche Untersuchungen zum Neuen Testament ; 327
Wissenschaftliche Untersuchungen zum Neuen Testament 327
Technical Details
  • Access in Virgo Classic

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