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The Colors of the New World: Artists, Materials, and the Creation of the Florentine Codex

Diana Magaloni Kerpel
Format
Book
Published
Los Angeles : Getty Research Institute, [2014]
Language
English
Variant Title
Artists, materials, and the creation of the Florentine codex
Series
Getty Research Institute Council Lecture
ISBN
9781606063293, 1606063294
Summary
In August 1576, in the midst of an outbreak of the plague, the Spanish Franciscan friar Bernardino de Sahagún and twenty-two indigenous artists locked themselves inside the school of Santa Cruz de Tlaltelolco in Mexico City with a mission: to create nothing less than the first illustrated encyclopedia of the New World. Today this twelve-volume manuscript is preserved in the Biblioteca Medicea Laurenziana in Florence and is widely known as the Florentine Codex. A monumental achievement, the Florentine Codex is the single most important artistic and historical document for studying the peoples and cultures of pre-Hispanic and colonial Central Mexico. It reflects both indigenous and Spanish traditions of writing and painting, including parallel columns of text in Spanish and Nahuatl and more than two thousand watercolor illustrations prepared in European and Aztec pictorial styles. This volume reveals the complex meanings inherent in the selection of the pigments used in the manuscript, offering a fascinating look into a previously hidden symbolic language. Drawing on cutting edge approaches in art history, anthropology, and the material sciences, the book sheds new light on one of the world's great manuscripts - and on a pivotal moment in the early modern Americas.
Description
xi, 67 pages : color illustrations ; 21 cm.
Notes
  • Introductory essay by Cuauhtémoc Medina.
  • Includes bibliographical references (pages 60-64).
Technical Details
  • Access in Virgo Classic
  • Staff View

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    a| xi, 67 pages : b| color illustrations ; c| 21 cm.
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    a| text 2| rdacontentW
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    a| Introductory essay by Cuauhtémoc Medina.
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    a| In August 1576, in the midst of an outbreak of the plague, the Spanish Franciscan friar Bernardino de Sahagún and twenty-two indigenous artists locked themselves inside the school of Santa Cruz de Tlaltelolco in Mexico City with a mission: to create nothing less than the first illustrated encyclopedia of the New World. Today this twelve-volume manuscript is preserved in the Biblioteca Medicea Laurenziana in Florence and is widely known as the Florentine Codex. A monumental achievement, the Florentine Codex is the single most important artistic and historical document for studying the peoples and cultures of pre-Hispanic and colonial Central Mexico. It reflects both indigenous and Spanish traditions of writing and painting, including parallel columns of text in Spanish and Nahuatl and more than two thousand watercolor illustrations prepared in European and Aztec pictorial styles. This volume reveals the complex meanings inherent in the selection of the pigments used in the manuscript, offering a fascinating look into a previously hidden symbolic language. Drawing on cutting edge approaches in art history, anthropology, and the material sciences, the book sheds new light on one of the world's great manuscripts - and on a pivotal moment in the early modern Americas.
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    a| Códice florentino.
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    a| Illumination of books and manuscripts z| Mexico x| Technique.
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    a| Pigments.
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    a| Artists' materials z| Mexico.
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    a| Manuscripts, Mexican.
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    a| Medina, Cuauhtémoc e| writer of introduction.
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    a| F1219.56 .C7552 M34 2014 w| LC i| X031653605 l| STACKS m| ALDERMAN t| BOOK
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