Item Details

Print View

Seizing Power: The Strategic Logic of Military Coups

Naunihal Singh
Format
Book
Published
Baltimore : Johns Hopkins University Press, 2014.
Language
English
ISBN
9781421413365, 1421413361
Summary
"While coups drive a majority of regime changes and are responsible for the overthrow of many democratic governments, there has been very little empirical work on the subject. Seizing Power develops a new theory of coup dynamics and outcomes, drawing on 300 hours of interviews with coup participants and an original dataset of 471 coup attempts worldwide from 1950 to 2000. Naunihal Singh delivers a concise and empirical evaluation, arguing that understanding the dynamics of military factions is essential to predicting the success or failure of coups. Singh draws on an aspect of game theory known as a coordination game to explain coup dynamics. He finds a strong correlation between successful coups and the ability of military actors to project control and the inevitability of success. Examining Ghana's multiple coups and the 1991 coup attempt in the USSR, Singh shows how military actors project an image of impending victory that is often more powerful than the reality on the ground. In his close analysis of ten coups in Ghana from 1967 to 1981, Singh identifies three distinct points of coup origination: coups from top military officers, coups from the middle ranks, and mutinous coups from low-level soldiers."--Publisher's website.
Contents
  • Introduction
  • Theory
  • Counting coups
  • Coups from the top of the military
  • Coups from the middle
  • Coups from the bottom
  • USSR, 1991 : three days that changed the world
  • Conclusion.
Description
x, 252 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
Notes
Includes bibliographical references (pages 235-245) and index.
Technical Details
  • Access in Virgo Classic
  • Staff View

    LEADER 02984cam a2200505 i 4500
    001 u6423453
    003 SIRSI
    005 20141007114902.0
    008 131117t20142014mdua b 001 0 eng d
    010
      
      
    a| 2013949132
    020
      
      
    a| 9781421413365 q| alkaline paper
    020
      
      
    a| 1421413361 q| alkaline paper
    035
      
      
    a| (Sirsi) o863196413
    035
      
      
    a| (OCoLC)863196413
    043
      
      
    a| f-gh--- a| e-ur---
    040
      
      
    a| BTCTA b| eng e| rda c| BTCTA d| YDXCP d| BDX d| OCLCO d| JHE d| NGU d| OCLCF d| CDX
    050
      
    4
    a| JC494 b| .S56 2014
    082
    0
    4
    a| 321.09 2| 23
    100
    1
      
    a| Singh, Naunihal e| author.
    245
    1
    0
    a| Seizing power : b| the strategic logic of military coups / c| Naunihal Singh.
    264
      
    1
    a| Baltimore : b| Johns Hopkins University Press, c| 2014.
    264
      
    4
    c| ©2014
    300
      
      
    a| x, 252 pages : b| illustrations ; c| 24 cm
    336
      
      
    a| text b| txt 2| rdacontent
    337
      
      
    a| unmediated b| n 2| rdamedia
    338
      
      
    a| volume b| nc 2| rdacarrier
    504
      
      
    a| Includes bibliographical references (pages 235-245) and index.
    505
    0
      
    a| Introduction -- Theory -- Counting coups -- Coups from the top of the military -- Coups from the middle -- Coups from the bottom -- USSR, 1991 : three days that changed the world -- Conclusion.
    520
      
      
    a| "While coups drive a majority of regime changes and are responsible for the overthrow of many democratic governments, there has been very little empirical work on the subject. Seizing Power develops a new theory of coup dynamics and outcomes, drawing on 300 hours of interviews with coup participants and an original dataset of 471 coup attempts worldwide from 1950 to 2000. Naunihal Singh delivers a concise and empirical evaluation, arguing that understanding the dynamics of military factions is essential to predicting the success or failure of coups. Singh draws on an aspect of game theory known as a coordination game to explain coup dynamics. He finds a strong correlation between successful coups and the ability of military actors to project control and the inevitability of success. Examining Ghana's multiple coups and the 1991 coup attempt in the USSR, Singh shows how military actors project an image of impending victory that is often more powerful than the reality on the ground. In his close analysis of ten coups in Ghana from 1967 to 1981, Singh identifies three distinct points of coup origination: coups from top military officers, coups from the middle ranks, and mutinous coups from low-level soldiers."--Publisher's website.
    650
      
    0
    a| Coups d'état.
    650
      
    0
    a| Coups d'état z| Ghana.
    650
      
    0
    a| Coups d'état z| Soviet Union.
    596
      
      
    a| 2
    999
      
      
    a| JC494 .S56 2014 w| LC i| X031651241 k| CHECKEDOUT l| STACKS m| ALDERMAN t| BOOK
▾See more
▴See less

Availability

Google Preview

Google Books Preview
Library Location Map Availability Call Number
Alderman CHECKED OUT N/A Unavailable