Item Details

Theoderic and the Roman Imperial Restoration

Jonathan J. Arnold, University of Tulsa
Format
Book
Published
New York, NY : Cambridge University Press, 2014.
Language
English
ISBN
9781107054400, 1107054400, 9781107679474, 1107679478
Related Resources
Cover image
Summary
"This book provides a new interpretation of the fall of the Roman Empire and the "barbarian" kingdom known conventionally as Ostrogothic Italy. Relying primarily on Italian textual and material evidence, and in particular the works of Cassiodorus and Ennodius, Jonathan J. Arnold argues that contemporary Italo-Romans viewed the Ostrogothic kingdom as the Western Roman Empire and its "barbarian" king, Theoderic (r. 489/93-526), as its emperor. Investigating conceptions of Romanness, Arnold explains how the Roman past, both immediate and distant, allowed Theoderic and his Goths to find acceptance in Italy as Romans, with roles essential to the Empire's perceived recovery. Theoderic and the Roman Imperial Restoration demonstrates how Theoderic's careful attention to imperial traditions, good governance, and reconquest followed by the re-Romanization of lost imperial territories contributed to contemporary sentiments of imperial resurgence and a golden age. There was no need for Justinian to restore the Western Empire: Theoderic had already done so"--
Contents
  • Part I. An Empire Turned Upside-Down
  • 1. Ennodius the Ligurian
  • 2. Cassiodorus the Calabrian
  • Part II. Emperor Theoderic
  • 3. Princeps romanus
  • 4. The Imperial image
  • Part III. Italo-Romans and Roman Goths
  • 5. Men of Mars
  • 6. Rex genitus, vir inlustris
  • Part IV. Italia Felix
  • 7. Italy revived
  • 8. Rome rejuvenated
  • Part V. Renovatio Imperii
  • 9. Becoming post-Roman
  • 10. Gallia felix
  • Epilogue.
Description
xii, 340 pages ; 24 cm
Notes
Includes bibliographical references (pages 303-333) and index.
Technical Details
  • Access in Virgo Classic

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    a| Theoderic and the Roman imperial restoration / c| Jonathan J. Arnold, University of Tulsa.
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    a| New York, NY : b| Cambridge University Press, c| 2014.
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    a| xii, 340 pages ; c| 24 cm
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    a| Includes bibliographical references (pages 303-333) and index.
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    a| Part I. An Empire Turned Upside-Down -- 1. Ennodius the Ligurian -- 2. Cassiodorus the Calabrian -- Part II. Emperor Theoderic -- 3. Princeps romanus -- 4. The Imperial image -- Part III. Italo-Romans and Roman Goths -- 5. Men of Mars -- 6. Rex genitus, vir inlustris -- Part IV. Italia Felix -- 7. Italy revived -- 8. Rome rejuvenated -- Part V. Renovatio Imperii -- 9. Becoming post-Roman -- 10. Gallia felix -- Epilogue.
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    a| "This book provides a new interpretation of the fall of the Roman Empire and the "barbarian" kingdom known conventionally as Ostrogothic Italy. Relying primarily on Italian textual and material evidence, and in particular the works of Cassiodorus and Ennodius, Jonathan J. Arnold argues that contemporary Italo-Romans viewed the Ostrogothic kingdom as the Western Roman Empire and its "barbarian" king, Theoderic (r. 489/93-526), as its emperor. Investigating conceptions of Romanness, Arnold explains how the Roman past, both immediate and distant, allowed Theoderic and his Goths to find acceptance in Italy as Romans, with roles essential to the Empire's perceived recovery. Theoderic and the Roman Imperial Restoration demonstrates how Theoderic's careful attention to imperial traditions, good governance, and reconquest followed by the re-Romanization of lost imperial territories contributed to contemporary sentiments of imperial resurgence and a golden age. There was no need for Justinian to restore the Western Empire: Theoderic had already done so"-- c| Provided by publisher.
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    a| Theodoric, c| King of the Ostrogoths, d| 454?-526.
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    a| Ostrogoths z| Italy x| History.
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    a| Ostrogoths z| Italy v| Biography.
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    a| Goths x| Kings and rulers v| Biography.
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    a| Restorations, Political x| History y| To 1500.
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    a| Imperialism x| History y| To 1500.
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    a| Italy x| Kings and rulers v| Biography.
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    a| Italy x| History y| 476-774.
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    a| Rome x| History.
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