Item Details

Print View

Shinran's Kyōgyōshinshō: The Collection of Passages Expounding the True Teaching, Living, Faith, and Realizing of the Pure Land

translated by Daisetz Teitarō Suzuki ; edited by The Center for Shin Buddhist Studies under the supervision of Sengaku Mayeda ; Shinshū Ōtani-Ha, Higashi Honganji
Format
Book
Published
Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, c2012.
Language
English
Japanese (translated from)
Uniform Title
Kyōgyō Shinshō English
ISBN
9780199863105 (hbk. : acid-free paper), 0199863105 (hbk. : acid-free paper)
Summary
"This annotated translation by Daisetz Suzuki (1870-1966) comprises the first four of six chapters of the Kyogyoshinsho, the definitive doctrinal work of Shinran (1173-1262). Shinran founded the Jodo Shin sect of Pure Land Buddhism, now the largest religious organization in Japan. Writing in Classical Chinese, Shinran began this, his magnum opus, while in exile and spent the better part of thirty years after his return to Kyoto revising the text. Although unfinished, Suzuki's translation conveys the text's core religious message, showing how Shinran offered a new understanding of faith through studying teachings before engaging in praxis, rather than the more common and far more limited view of faith in Buddhism as relevant to one just beginning their pursuit of Buddhist truth. Although Suzuki is best known for his scholarship on Zen Buddhism, he took a lifelong interest in Pure Land Buddhism. Suzuki's own religious perspective is evident in his translation of gyo as ''True Living'' rather than the expected ''Practice, '' and of sho as ''True Realizing of the Pure Land'' rather than the expected ''Enlightenment'' or ''Confirmation.'' This book contains the second edition of Suzuki's translation. It includes a number of corrections to the original 1973 edition, long out of print, as well as Suzuki's unfinished preface in its original form for the first time"--
Description
xxii, 310 p. : ill. (chiefly col.) ; 25 cm.
Notes
  • "Shinran Shōnin's 750th memorial service commemorative publication"--P. facing t.p.
  • Includes bibliographical references (p. [275]-283) and index.
Technical Details
  • Access in Virgo Classic
  • Staff View

    LEADER 03164cam a2200469 a 4500
    001 u5828222
    003 SIRSI
    005 20121030193745.0
    008 111201s2012 enka b 001 0 eng
    010
      
      
    a| 2011049533
    020
      
      
    a| 9780199863105 (hbk. : acid-free paper)
    020
      
      
    a| 0199863105 (hbk. : acid-free paper)
    035
      
      
    a| (Sirsi) o758391845
    035
      
      
    a| (OCoLC)758391845
    040
      
      
    a| DLC b| eng c| DLC d| YDX d| BTCTA d| UKMGB d| BDX d| OCLCO d| YDXCP d| CDX
    041
    1
      
    a| eng h| jpn
    042
      
      
    a| pcc
    050
    0
    0
    a| BQ8749.S554 b| K9513 2012
    082
    0
    0
    a| 294.3/926 2| 23
    100
    0
      
    a| Shinran, d| 1173-1263.
    240
    1
    0
    a| Kyōgyō shinshō. l| English
    245
    1
    0
    a| Shinran's Kyōgyōshinshō : b| the collection of passages expounding the true teaching, living, faith, and realizing of the Pure Land / c| translated by Daisetz Teitarō Suzuki ; edited by The Center for Shin Buddhist Studies under the supervision of Sengaku Mayeda ; Shinshū Ōtani-Ha, Higashi Honganji.
    260
      
      
    a| Oxford ; a| New York : b| Oxford University Press, c| c2012.
    300
      
      
    a| xxii, 310 p. : b| ill. (chiefly col.) ; c| 25 cm.
    500
      
      
    a| "Shinran Shōnin's 750th memorial service commemorative publication"--P. facing t.p.
    504
      
      
    a| Includes bibliographical references (p. [275]-283) and index.
    520
      
      
    a| "This annotated translation by Daisetz Suzuki (1870-1966) comprises the first four of six chapters of the Kyogyoshinsho, the definitive doctrinal work of Shinran (1173-1262). Shinran founded the Jodo Shin sect of Pure Land Buddhism, now the largest religious organization in Japan. Writing in Classical Chinese, Shinran began this, his magnum opus, while in exile and spent the better part of thirty years after his return to Kyoto revising the text. Although unfinished, Suzuki's translation conveys the text's core religious message, showing how Shinran offered a new understanding of faith through studying teachings before engaging in praxis, rather than the more common and far more limited view of faith in Buddhism as relevant to one just beginning their pursuit of Buddhist truth. Although Suzuki is best known for his scholarship on Zen Buddhism, he took a lifelong interest in Pure Land Buddhism. Suzuki's own religious perspective is evident in his translation of gyo as ''True Living'' rather than the expected ''Practice, '' and of sho as ''True Realizing of the Pure Land'' rather than the expected ''Enlightenment'' or ''Confirmation.'' This book contains the second edition of Suzuki's translation. It includes a number of corrections to the original 1973 edition, long out of print, as well as Suzuki's unfinished preface in its original form for the first time"-- c| Provided by publisher.
    650
      
    0
    a| Shin (Sect) x| Doctrines.
    700
    1
      
    a| Suzuki, Daisetz Teitaro, d| 1870-1966.
    596
      
      
    a| 2
    999
      
      
    a| BQ8749 .S554 K9513 2012 w| LC i| X030845948 l| STACKS m| ALDERMAN t| BOOK
▾See more
▴See less

Availability

Google Preview

Google Books Preview
Library Location Map Availability Call Number
Alderman Stacks Map Available