Item Details

Understanding U.S. Farm Exits

Robert A. Hoppe and Penni Korb
Format
EBook; Book; Government Document; Online
Published
Washington, D.C. : United States Dept. of Agriculture, Economic Research Service, [2006]
Language
English
Variant Title
Understanding United States farm exits
Series
Economic Research Report
Economic Research Report (United States. Department of Agriculture. Economic Research Service)
SuDoc Number
A 93.73:21
Abstract
The rate at which U.S. farms go out of business, or exit farming, is about 9 or 10 percent per year, comparable to exit rates for nonfarm small businesses in the United States. U.S. farms have not disappeared because the rate of entry into farming is nearly as high as the exit rate. The relatively stable farm count since the 1970s reflects exits and entries essentially in balance. The probability of exit is higher for recent entrants than for older, more established farms. Farms operated by Blacks are more likely to exit than those operated by Whites, but the gap between Black and White exit probabilities has declined substantially since the 1980s. Exit probabilities differ by specialization, with beef farms less likely to exit than cash grain or hog farms.
Description
iv, 36 p. : ill. ; 28 cm.
Notes
  • "June 2006."
  • Also available on the World Wide Web.
  • Includes bibliographical references (p. 25-27).
Series Statement
Economic research report ; no. 21
Economic research report (United States. Department of Agriculture. Economic Research Service) no. 21
Logo for Copyright Not EvaluatedCopyright Not Evaluated
Technical Details
  • Access in Virgo Classic

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    a| Understanding United States farm exits
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    a| iv, 36 p. : b| ill. ; c| 28 cm.
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    a| "June 2006."
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    a| Includes bibliographical references (p. 25-27).
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    a| The rate at which U.S. farms go out of business, or exit farming, is about 9 or 10 percent per year, comparable to exit rates for nonfarm small businesses in the United States. U.S. farms have not disappeared because the rate of entry into farming is nearly as high as the exit rate. The relatively stable farm count since the 1970s reflects exits and entries essentially in balance. The probability of exit is higher for recent entrants than for older, more established farms. Farms operated by Blacks are more likely to exit than those operated by Whites, but the gap between Black and White exit probabilities has declined substantially since the 1980s. Exit probabilities differ by specialization, with beef farms less likely to exit than cash grain or hog farms.
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    a| Farms x| Economic aspects z| United States.
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    a| Hoppe, Robert A. t| Understanding U.S. farm exits h| iv, 36 p. w| (OCoLC)76811457
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    a| Economic research report (United States. Department of Agriculture. Economic Research Service) v| no. 21.
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