Item Details

Beyond the Writers' Workshop: New Ways to Write Creative Nonfiction

Carol Bly
Format
Book
Published
New York : Anchor Books, 2001.
Edition
1st Anchor Books ed
Language
English
ISBN
0385499191
Contents
  • Chapter 1 Taking on Three Demanding Situations First 3
  • Cultural Deprivation 4
  • New, Nontraditional Mission of Present-Day Writers 9
  • Eight Elements of Bad or Scanty Teaching of Creative Writing 15
  • Chapter 2 A Fundamental Mistake in How We Learn to Write: Skipping the Long Middle Stage of Writing 33
  • Three Stages of Writing a Manuscript 37
  • Chapter 3 Using Empathic Questioning to Deepen Your First Draft 46
  • Empathic Inquiry 48
  • Some Final Thoughts 58
  • Chapter 4 How Stage-Development Philosophy Serves Writers 59
  • A Basic Overview of Stage-Development Theory 59
  • Assumptions of Stage-Development Theory 65
  • How Two Authors Offer Us Stage Philosophies That Are Especially Pertinent to Writers 70
  • Chapter 5 We Have Pushed Off from the Animal Kingdom for Good: Good News for Writers from Neuroscientists 76
  • Reentry and Literary Endeavor 82
  • Becoming a Generalist 92
  • Love of Thinking 94
  • Chapter 6 Literary Fixes 100
  • Driving the Exposition Inward 101
  • Raising the Tone 109
  • Changing Statement to Theater (Showing, not Telling) 111
  • Combating Lying and Cowardice 113
  • Removing Self-References 116
  • Pushing Off from Mindless Male Realism and Mindless Female Realism 119
  • Checking for the Skinflint Syndrome and Enhancing Your Manuscript as a Gift to the Reader 121
  • Asking, for a Last Time, What Is Still Missing from This Manuscript? 122
  • Small Language Fixes That Help Remove Humbug 122
  • Starting Sentences with Dependent Clauses 126
  • Getting Rid of We, Everybody, and All 127
  • Chapter 7 Seven General Issues in Teaching Creative Writing 129
  • Writing Literature Can Be Taught 129
  • Protecting Student Writers from the U.S.A. Junk Culture 133
  • Curing Writers of the Bad Habit of Perseverating 139
  • Convincing Writers that Surprise Is the Inevitable, Eternal Principle of Literature 140
  • Practicing Professional Reticence 142
  • Being Aware of Bullying 143
  • Making the Classroom One of the Great Places on Earth 145
  • Chapter 8 Teaching Elementary School Children to Write 148
  • Ways to Use the Appendix When Working with Children 148
  • No Children's Writing Should Ever Be Subjected to Peer Review 155
  • Validating the Serious as Well as the Fun-Loving Spirits of Children 157
  • Offering Some Comment for Every Piece of Creative Writing a Child Does 160
  • Giving a Child Two Opportunities to Answer a Question 161
  • Teaching Children as Well as Ourselves the Psychological Skills that Protect a Person's Personality from Group Bullying or from Unfair Pressure by People in Authority 162
  • Asking Children to Memorize One Hundred Stories by the Age of Eighteen 163
  • Chapter 9 Helping People in Middle and High School Learn to Write 171
  • Adolescents and Monoculture 171
  • Using the Appendix of This Book with Adolescent People 173
  • No Peer Reviewing of Manuscripts 178
  • No Teaching of Literary Techniques 179
  • No Asking for Rough Drafts of Creative Writing 182
  • Never Failing to Comment on the Core Content of Students' Papers 183
  • Teaching Adolescent Writers to Continue Memorizing Stories, if They Started in Elementary School, and to Add Poems 184
  • An Ethics Code for Teachers of Adolescents 184
  • Chapter 10 Helping College Students and M.F.A. Candidates to Write 185
  • Leaving Behind the Natural but Useless Attitudes Common to Any Enclave of Creative Writers 185
  • Ways to Help College- and Graduate-Level Writers Experience a Literary Change of Heart 206
  • Chapter 11 Teaching at Writers' Conferences, Community Retreats, and Summer Short Courses 217
  • What These Courses Are, and the Burgeoning Population Who Use Them 217
  • Three Kinds of Populations We Don't Serve Well Enough So Far 222
  • Chapter 12 Some Issues of Aesthetics and Ethics of Writing Literature 235
  • Some Psychological Dynamics of Aesthetics and Ethics 235
  • Distinguishing Hack0 Work from Literary Artifice 246
  • Normalized Indifference Is Our Comfortable Stance on Any Subject until Something Jars Us 247
  • How the Old, Familiar Dynamic Called Pain Avoidance Affects Creative Nonfiction 254
  • Falsifying What Could Otherwise Be Interesting Psychological Evidence about Homo Sapiens in One or Another Setting 261
  • Hatred of Literature by Those Left Out of It and Sometimes by Those of Us Who Participate in It 267
  • A Psychological Tool for Ethically Minded Writers 272
  • Writing Creative Nonfiction for the 400,000 274
  • Appendix I. Fifteen Writing Exercises 279
  • Four Exercises about Background or Place
  • 1. Writing without Cliches about a Beautiful Place 281
  • 2. Ugly Place, Good Event: Ugly Event, Good Place 283
  • 3. Pathetically Shallow Use of Places Once Full of Serious Enterprise 284
  • 4. Paying Respectful Attention to Background Settings 286
  • Easy Exercises
  • 5. Good and Terrible Qualities in Human Nature--An Exercise for People over the Age of Fourteen 288
  • 6. Ignatow Poem Exercise 289
  • 7. A Catty Vignette 292
  • 8. An Essay Pot--A Group Talking Exercise 295
  • 9. Writing about Work 297
  • Elegant Exercises
  • 10. Attending to Other--Specifically Attending to Relatives, Nonhuman Creatures, or Plants 301
  • 11. Increasing One's Affection for Utterly Ordinary People 303
  • 12. A Writing Exercise for Extroverts 306
  • 13. An Irritating Person Exercise 309
  • 14. A Nearly Impossible Writing Exercise 311
  • 15. Andover Format: Writing Your Life at Two Levels--One the Usual Sort of Memoir, and the Other Secret and Profound 315
  • Appendix II. Usage Sheets 322
  • Appendix III. Abbreviations and Notes for Referencing Margin Comment on Students' Papers 328
  • Appendix IV. Formats and Strategies 330
  • A Format for Writing an Essay 329
  • Vertical-Line Way of Taking Notes 331
  • Analyzing a Literary Work of Art 332
  • Appendix V. A List of Useful Sentences for Writers in a Tight Spot 335
  • Appendix VI. Two Examples of Class Agendas for M.F.A. Students 340
  • Appendix VII. Robertson-Bly Ethics Code for Teaching Writing to Middle and High School Students 349.
Description
xxiv, 376 p. ; 21 cm.
Notes
Includes bibliographical references (p. 355-362) and index.
Technical Details
  • Access in Virgo Classic

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    g| Chapter 1 t| Taking on Three Demanding Situations First g| 3 -- t| Cultural Deprivation g| 4 -- t| New, Nontraditional Mission of Present-Day Writers g| 9 -- t| Eight Elements of Bad or Scanty Teaching of Creative Writing g| 15 -- g| Chapter 2 t| A Fundamental Mistake in How We Learn to Write: Skipping the Long Middle Stage of Writing g| 33 -- t| Three Stages of Writing a Manuscript g| 37 -- g| Chapter 3 t| Using Empathic Questioning to Deepen Your First Draft g| 46 -- t| Empathic Inquiry g| 48 -- t| Some Final Thoughts g| 58 -- g| Chapter 4 t| How Stage-Development Philosophy Serves Writers g| 59 -- t| A Basic Overview of Stage-Development Theory g| 59 -- t| Assumptions of Stage-Development Theory g| 65 -- t| How Two Authors Offer Us Stage Philosophies That Are Especially Pertinent to Writers g| 70 -- g| Chapter 5 t| We Have Pushed Off from the Animal Kingdom for Good: Good News for Writers from Neuroscientists g| 76 -- t| Reentry and Literary Endeavor g| 82 -- t| Becoming a Generalist g| 92 -- t| Love of Thinking g| 94 -- g| Chapter 6 t| Literary Fixes g| 100 -- t| Driving the Exposition Inward g| 101 -- t| Raising the Tone g| 109 -- t| Changing Statement to Theater (Showing, not Telling) g| 111 -- t| Combating Lying and Cowardice g| 113 -- t| Removing Self-References g| 116 -- t| Pushing Off from Mindless Male Realism and Mindless Female Realism g| 119 -- t| Checking for the Skinflint Syndrome and Enhancing Your Manuscript as a Gift to the Reader g| 121 -- t| Asking, for a Last Time, What Is Still Missing from This Manuscript? g| 122 -- t| Small Language Fixes That Help Remove Humbug g| 122 -- t| Starting Sentences with Dependent Clauses g| 126 -- t| Getting Rid of We, Everybody, and All g| 127 -- g| Chapter 7 t| Seven General Issues in Teaching Creative Writing g| 129 -- t| Writing Literature Can Be Taught g| 129 -- t| Protecting Student Writers from the U.S.A. Junk Culture g| 133 -- t| Curing Writers of the Bad Habit of Perseverating g| 139 -- t| Convincing Writers that Surprise Is the Inevitable, Eternal Principle of Literature g| 140 -- t| Practicing Professional Reticence g| 142 -- t| Being Aware of Bullying g| 143 -- t| Making the Classroom One of the Great Places on Earth g| 145 -- g| Chapter 8 t| Teaching Elementary School Children to Write g| 148 -- t| Ways to Use the Appendix When Working with Children g| 148 -- t| No Children's Writing Should Ever Be Subjected to Peer Review g| 155 -- t| Validating the Serious as Well as the Fun-Loving Spirits of Children g| 157 -- t| Offering Some Comment for Every Piece of Creative Writing a Child Does g| 160 -- t| Giving a Child Two Opportunities to Answer a Question g| 161 -- t| Teaching Children as Well as Ourselves the Psychological Skills that Protect a Person's Personality from Group Bullying or from Unfair Pressure by People in Authority g| 162 -- t| Asking Children to Memorize One Hundred Stories by the Age of Eighteen g| 163 -- g| Chapter 9 t| Helping People in Middle and High School Learn to Write g| 171 -- t| Adolescents and Monoculture g| 171 -- t| Using the Appendix of This Book with Adolescent People g| 173 -- t| No Peer Reviewing of Manuscripts g| 178 -- t| No Teaching of Literary Techniques g| 179 -- t| No Asking for Rough Drafts of Creative Writing g| 182 -- t| Never Failing to Comment on the Core Content of Students' Papers g| 183 -- t| Teaching Adolescent Writers to Continue Memorizing Stories, if They Started in Elementary School, and to Add Poems g| 184 -- t| An Ethics Code for Teachers of Adolescents g| 184 -- g| Chapter 10 t| Helping College Students and M.F.A. Candidates to Write g| 185 -- t| Leaving Behind the Natural but Useless Attitudes Common to Any Enclave of Creative Writers g| 185 -- t| Ways to Help College- and Graduate-Level Writers Experience a Literary Change of Heart g| 206 -- g| Chapter 11 t| Teaching at Writers' Conferences, Community Retreats, and Summer Short Courses g| 217 -- t| What These Courses Are, and the Burgeoning Population Who Use Them g| 217 -- t| Three Kinds of Populations We Don't Serve Well Enough So Far g| 222 -- g| Chapter 12 t| Some Issues of Aesthetics and Ethics of Writing Literature g| 235 -- t| Some Psychological Dynamics of Aesthetics and Ethics g| 235 -- t| Distinguishing Hack0 Work from Literary Artifice g| 246 -- t| Normalized Indifference Is Our Comfortable Stance on Any Subject until Something Jars Us g| 247 -- t| How the Old, Familiar Dynamic Called Pain Avoidance Affects Creative Nonfiction g| 254 -- t| Falsifying What Could Otherwise Be Interesting Psychological Evidence about Homo Sapiens in One or Another Setting g| 261 -- t| Hatred of Literature by Those Left Out of It and Sometimes by Those of Us Who Participate in It g| 267 -- t| A Psychological Tool for Ethically Minded Writers g| 272 -- t| Writing Creative Nonfiction for the 400,000 g| 274 -- g| Appendix I. t| Fifteen Writing Exercises g| 279 -- t| Four Exercises about Background or Place -- g| 1. t| Writing without Cliches about a Beautiful Place g| 281 -- g| 2. t| Ugly Place, Good Event: Ugly Event, Good Place g| 283 -- g| 3. t| Pathetically Shallow Use of Places Once Full of Serious Enterprise g| 284 -- g| 4. t| Paying Respectful Attention to Background Settings g| 286 -- t| Easy Exercises -- g| 5. t| Good and Terrible Qualities in Human Nature--An Exercise for People over the Age of Fourteen g| 288 -- g| 6. t| Ignatow Poem Exercise g| 289 -- g| 7. t| A Catty Vignette g| 292 -- g| 8. t| An Essay Pot--A Group Talking Exercise g| 295 -- g| 9. t| Writing about Work g| 297 -- t| Elegant Exercises -- g| 10. t| Attending to Other--Specifically Attending to Relatives, Nonhuman Creatures, or Plants g| 301 -- g| 11. t| Increasing One's Affection for Utterly Ordinary People g| 303 -- g| 12. t| A Writing Exercise for Extroverts g| 306 -- g| 13. t| An Irritating Person Exercise g| 309 -- g| 14. t| A Nearly Impossible Writing Exercise g| 311 -- g| 15. t| Andover Format: Writing Your Life at Two Levels--One the Usual Sort of Memoir, and the Other Secret and Profound g| 315 -- g| Appendix II. t| Usage Sheets g| 322 -- g| Appendix III. t| Abbreviations and Notes for Referencing Margin Comment on Students' Papers g| 328 -- g| Appendix IV. t| Formats and Strategies g| 330 -- t| A Format for Writing an Essay g| 329 -- t| Vertical-Line Way of Taking Notes g| 331 -- t| Analyzing a Literary Work of Art g| 332 -- g| Appendix V. t| A List of Useful Sentences for Writers in a Tight Spot g| 335 -- g| Appendix VI. t| Two Examples of Class Agendas for M.F.A. Students g| 340 -- g| Appendix VII. t| Robertson-Bly Ethics Code for Teaching Writing to Middle and High School Students g| 349.
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