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Practical Data Communications

Roger L. Freeman
Format
Book
Published
New York : John Wiley, c2001.
Edition
2nd ed
Language
English
Series
Wiley Series in Telecommunications and Signal Processing
ISBN
0471393029 (cloth : alk. paper)
Contents
  • Chapter 1 Enterprise Network Environment 1
  • 1.1 Enterprise Networks 1
  • 1.2 Types of Network Topology 3
  • 1.3 Network Access: An Overview 6
  • 1.4 Initial Network Design Considerations 7
  • 1.5 Connection-Oriented and Connectionless Service 8
  • 1.6 Data Protocols: Key to Network Operation 8
  • 1.6.2 Basic Protocol Functions 9
  • Chapter 2 OSI Model and the Data-Link Layer 13
  • 2.2 Layering 14
  • 2.2.2 Basic Structuring Technique 14
  • 2.3 Type and Instance 15
  • 2.4 Possible Sublayers 16
  • 2.5 Data Units 17
  • 2.6 Specific Layers of the OSI Reference Model 18
  • 2.7 Layer Descriptions 19
  • 2.8 Specific Comments on OSI 33
  • 2.9 Discussion of OSI Layers 1-4 34
  • 2.9.1 Physical Layer (Layer 1) 34
  • 2.9.2 Data-Link Layer (Layer 2) 35
  • 2.9.3 Network Layer (Layer 3) 37
  • 2.9.4 Internet Protocol (IP) and Gateway Layer (Layer 3.5) 37
  • 2.9.5 Transport Layer (Layer 4) 38
  • 2.10 Procedural Versus Electrical 39
  • 2.10.1 Narrative 39
  • Chapter 3 High-Level Data-Link Control (HDLC) Typical Data-Link Layer Protocol 41
  • 3.2 Stations and Configurations 42
  • 3.3 Modes of Operation Used with HDLC 43
  • 3.4 HDLC Frame Structure 43
  • 3.4.1 Sequence Numbering in HDLC 45
  • 3.4.2 Poll/Final Bit 47
  • 3.4.3 Supervisory Frames 47
  • 3.4.4 Unnumbered (U) Frames 48
  • 3.4.5 Information Field 48
  • 3.4.6 Frame Check Sequence (FCS) Field 48
  • 3.5 Commands and Responses 49
  • 3.5.1 Mode-Setting Commands 49
  • 3.5.2 Miscellaneous Commands 51
  • 3.5.3 Responses to Unnumbered Commands 51
  • 3.6 Frame Operation 52
  • 3.7 Error Recovery 53
  • 3.8 Other Station Modes 54
  • 3.9 SDLC Variations with HDLC 55
  • Chapter 4 Data Network Operations 57
  • 4.2 General Requirements for the Interchange of Data 57
  • 4.3 Discussion of Issues and Requirements 58
  • 4.3.1 Pathway(s) Exist(s) 58
  • 4.3.2 Access to the Pathway 59
  • 4.3.3 Directing the Data Messages to Its Intended User(s) 59
  • 4.3.4 Data Urgency 59
  • 4.3.5 Maintenance of Data Integrity 60
  • 4.4 Error Detection Schemes 61
  • 4.4.1 Parity Checks 61
  • 4.4.2 Cyclic Redundancy Check (CRC) 62
  • 4.5 Error Correction Schemes 64
  • 4.5.1 Automatic Repeat Request (ARQ) 64
  • 4.5.2 Forward Error Correction (FEC) 65
  • 4.6 Data Switching 67
  • 4.6.1 Philosophy of "Data Signaling" Versus Telephone Signaling 69
  • 4.6.2 Smart Bridges, Routers, and Switching Hubs 71
  • Chapter 5 Data Transmission I 73
  • 5.1 Electrical Communication of Information 73
  • 5.2 Bit and Binary Transmission of Information 73
  • 5.3 Binary Codes for Data Communication 76
  • 5.4 Electrical Bit Decisions 79
  • 5.5 Electrical Representation of Binary Data 82
  • 5.5.1 Neutral and Polar Waveforms 82
  • 5.5.2 Waveforms and Line Codes 83
  • 5.6 Binary Conventions 84
  • 5.7 Bit-Parallel and Bit-Serial 85
  • 5.8 Baseband 86
  • 5.9 Data Rate 87
  • 5.9.1 Error Rate 87
  • Chapter 6 Data Transmission II 89
  • 6.1 Interpreting a Serial Stream of Bits 89
  • 6.1.1 Problem 89
  • 6.1.2 Start-Stop Transmission 89
  • 6.1.3 Synchronous Transmission 91
  • 6.2 Timing Distortion in a Serial Bit Stream 93
  • 6.3 Transmission of Digital Data 94
  • 6.3.1 Baseband Transmission 94
  • 6.3.2 Transmission of Data over Longer Distances 95
  • 6.3.3 Data Circuit Performance 102
  • 6.4 Interface at the Physical Layer 107
  • 6.4.2 DTE-DCE Interface 108
  • 6.5 Question of Bandwidth 116
  • 6.5.1 Bandwidth Versus Bit Rate 116
  • 6.5.3 First and Second Bandwidth Approximations 116
  • 6.5.4 Shannon 117
  • Chapter 7 Telecommunications Network as a Vehicle for Data Transport 121
  • 7.1 Public Switched Telecommunication Network 121
  • 7.1.2 Access to the PSTN: The Subscriber Network 122
  • 7.2 Introduction to Digital Networks 123
  • 7.2.2 Development of a PCM Signal 123
  • 7.2.3f Concept of Frame 131
  • 7.2.4 Line Code 134
  • 7.2.5 Regenerative Repeaters 135
  • 7.2.6 Higher-Order PCM Multiplex Systems 136
  • 7.2.7 Line Rates and Codes 139
  • 7.3 Brief Overview of Digital Switching 139
  • 7.3.1 Advantages and Issues of PCM Switching 139
  • 7.3.2 Approaches to PCM Switching 140
  • 7.3.3 Time Switch 140
  • 7.3.4 Space Switch 142
  • 7.3.5 Time-Space-Time Switch 144
  • 7.3.6 Space-Time-Space Switch 146
  • 7.4 Digital Network Structure 146
  • 7.5 Digital Network Impairments and Performance Requirements 147
  • 7.5.1 Error Performance 147
  • 7.5.2 Slips 147
  • 7.6 Data Transmission on the Digital Network 149
  • 7.7 Interconnects and Bypass 151
  • 7.8 Bypass in Economically Evolving Nations 152
  • Chapter 8 Transmission of Data over the Analog Voice Channel 155
  • 8.2 Two-Wire Versus Four-Wire Operation 156
  • 8.2.1 What Is Two-Wire and Four-Wire Operation? 156
  • 8.2.2 Two-Wire Transmission 156
  • 8.2.3 Four-Wire Transmission 156
  • 8.3 Echo and Singing: Telecommunication Network Impairments 159
  • 8.4 Amplitude Distortion and Phase Distortion 159
  • 8.4.2 Amplitude Distortion 160
  • 8.4.3 Phase Distortion 160
  • 8.4.4 Conditioning and Equalization 161
  • 8.5 Data Modems 165
  • 8.5.1 Where We Are and Where We Are Going 165
  • 8.5.2 Getting More Bits per Hertz 165
  • 8.5.3 Specific High-Speed Modems 168
  • 8.5.4 Scrambling and Its Rationale 174
  • 8.5.5 Introduction to Trellis-Coded Modulation (TCM) 176
  • 8.5.6 V.34 Modem: 28,8000 bps and 33,600 bps 178
  • 8.5.7 V.90 Modem--Maximum Data Rate: 56 kbps 187
  • Chapter 9 Data Communications in the Office Environment, Part 1 203
  • 9.2 Distinguishing Characteristics of LANs 204
  • 9.3 How LAN Protocols Relate to OSI 206
  • 9.4 Logical Link Control (LLC) 206
  • 9.4.1 LLC Sublayer Services and Primitives 208
  • 9.4.2 LLC PDU Structure 211
  • 9.5 Medium Access Control (MAC) 223
  • 9.5.2 Carrier Sense Multiple Access with Collision Detection (CSMA/CD) 223
  • 9.6 CSMA/CD--Current Status and Advanced Operation 232
  • 9.6.2 Half-Duplex and Full-Duplex 232
  • 9.6.3 Compatability Interfaces--Physical Layer 232
  • 9.6.4 Layer Interface Requirements 236
  • 9.6.5 Allowable Implementations--Parameterized Values 238
  • 9.6.6 Physical Signaling (PLS) and Attachment Unit Interface (AUI)--Selected Discussion 240
  • 9.6.7 System Configurations for Multisegment 10-Mbps Baseband Networks 249
  • 9.7 100-Mbps CSMA/CD Baseband Networks 252
  • 9.7.1 Overview--Key Points 252
  • 9.7.2 Reconciliation Sublayer (RS) and Media-Independent Interface (MII)--Description Details 256
  • 9.7.3 100BASE-T4, Its PMA, and PCS 261
  • 9.7.4 Physical Coding Sublayer (PCS) and Physical Medium Attachment (PMA) Sublayer, Type 100BASE-X 264
  • 9.7.5 System Considerations for Multisegment 100BASE-T Networks 271
  • 9.8 1000-Mbps CSMA/CD Networks 274
  • 9.8.2 Reconciliation Sublayer (RS) and Gigabit Media-Independent Interface (GMII) 276
  • 9.8.3 Physical Coding Sublayer (PCS) and Physical Medium Attachment (PMA) Sublayer, 1000BASE-X 277
  • 9.8.4 System Considerations for Multisegment 1000-Mbps Networks 283
  • Chapter 10 Data Communications in the Office Environment, Part 2 289
  • 10.1 Medium Access Control--Token-Passing Schemes 289
  • 10.1.2 Token-Passing Bus 290
  • 10.1.3 Token-Passing Ring 293
  • 10.1.4 Fiber Distributed Data Interface (FDDI) 308
  • 10.1.5 Wireless LANs (WLANs) 316
  • 10.2 Repeaters, Bridges, Routers, and Hubs 335
  • 10.2.1 Definitions and Interactions 335
  • 10.3 LAN Bridges--Overview 335
  • 10.3.2 Source Routing Bridges 352
  • 10.3.3 Remote Bridges 354
  • 10.4 Hubs and Switching Hubs 355
  • 10.4.1 Rationale and Function 355
  • 10.4.2 Improvements in Hub Technology 355
  • 10.5 Routers 356
  • 10.5.1 Addressing with Hierarchical Significance 356
  • 10.5.2 Subnet Masks 358
  • 10.6 Virtual Local Area Networks (VLANs) 358
  • 10.7 Servers and Intranets 359
  • 10.7.1 Servers 359
  • 10.7.2 Intranet and Extranet 360
  • Chapter 11 Wide Area Networks (WANs) 363
  • 11.1 Background and Scope 363
  • 11.2 Basic Approaches 364
  • 11.2.1 Point-to-Point Links 364
  • 11.2.2 Data Multiplexers and Statmultiplexers 366
  • 11.3 Packet Networks for Data Communication 367
  • 11.3.1 Introduction to Packet Data 367
  • 11.3.2 Packet-Switched and Virtual Connections Based on ITU-T Rec. X.25 369
  • 11.4 Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) 386
  • 11.4.1 Background and Application 386
  • 11.4.2 TCP/IP and Data-Link Layers 387
  • 11.4.3 IP Routing Function 390
  • 11.4.4 Detailed IP Operation 391
  • 11.4.5 Transmission Control Protocol 402
  • 11.4.6 Internet Protocol Version 6 (IPv6) 410
  • 11.5 User Datagram Protocol (UDP) 414
  • 11.5.1 UDP Header Format and Fields 414
  • 11.6 CLNP Protocol Based on ISO 8473 415
  • 11.6.1 CLNP Frame Formats 416
  • 11.6.2 Frame Field Description--Fixed Part 416
  • 11.6.3 Error Report PDU (ER) 423
  • 11.7 Networking via VSATs 424
  • 11.7.1 Rationale of VSAT Networks 424
  • 11.7.2 Basic Description of a VSAT Network 425
  • 11.7.3 Disadvantages of a VSAT Network 425
  • 11.7.4 Important Design Variables 427
  • 11.8 Hypothetical Reference Connections for Public Synchronous Data Networks 430
  • Chapter 12 Frame Relay 433
  • 12.1 How Can Networks Be Speeded Up? 433
  • 12.1.1 Genesis of Frame Relay 435
  • 12.2 Introduction to Frame Relay 436
  • 12.2.1 Frame Structure 437
  • 12.2.2 Address Field Discussion 441
  • 12.3 DL-CORE Parameters (As Defined by ANSI) 444
  • 12.3.1 Procedures 444
  • 12.4 Traffic and Billing on Frame Relay 445
  • 12.5 PVCs and SVCs 446
  • -- 12.6 Two Types of Interfaces: UNI and NNI 446
  • 12.7 Congestion Control: A Discussion 447
  • 12.7.1 Network Response to Congestion 448
  • 12.7.2 User Response to Congestion 448
  • 12.7.3 Consolidated Link Layer Management (CLLM) Messages 449
  • 12.7.4 Action of a Congested Node 452
  • 12.8 Flow Control and Possible Applications of FECN and BECN Bits 453
  • 12.8.1 FECN Usage 453
  • 12.8.2 BECN Usage 454
  • 12.9 Policing a Frame Relay Network 455
  • 12.9.3 Relationship Among Parameters 456
  • 12.10 Quality of Service Parameters 458
  • 12.11 Network Responsibilities 459
  • 12.12 Frame Relay Signalling Functions 460
  • 12.12.1 PVC Management Procedures 461
  • 12.12.2 Signaling Required for SVCs 468
  • 12.13 Compatibility Issues 474
  • Chapter 13 Integrated Services Digital Networks (ISDNs) 483
  • 13.2 ISDN Structures 483
  • 13.2.1 ISDN User Channels 483
  • 13.2.2 Basic and Primary Rate Interfaces 484
  • 13.3 User Access and Interface 485
  • 13.4 ISDN Protocols and Protocol Issues 488
  • 13.5 ISDN Networks 490
  • 13.6 ISDN Protocol Structures 493
  • 13.6.1 ISDN and OSI 493
  • 13.6.2 Layer 1 Interface, Basic Rate (CCITT) 494
  • 13.6.3 Layer 1 Interface, Primary Rate 500
  • 13.7 Overview of Layer 2 Interface: Link Access Procedure for the D Channel (LAPD) 505
  • 13.7.1 Layer 2 Frame Structure for Peer-to-Peer Communication 509
  • 13.8 Overview of Layer 3 514
  • 13.8.1 Layer 3 Specification 516
  • 13.9 ISDN Packet Mode Review 520
  • 13.9.2 Case A: Configuration When Accessing PSPDN Services 520
  • 13.9.3 Case B: Configuration for the ISDN Virtual Circuit Service 521
  • 13.9.4 Service Aspects 523
  • Chapter 14 Building and Campus Wiring and Cabling for Data Communications 527
  • 14.2 Major Elements of Telecommunication Building Layout 528
  • 14.3 Horizontal Cabling 528
  • 14.3.1 Selection of Media 529
  • 14.4 Backbone Cabling 530
  • 14.4.1 Topology of Backbone Cabling 530
  • 14.4.2 Selecting Cable Media 530
  • 14.5 Telecommunication Closets 532
  • 14.5.1 Cabling Practices 532
  • 14.6 Entrance Facilities 533
  • 14.7 100-[Omega] Unshielded Twisted-Pair (UTP) Cabling Systems 533
  • 14.7.1 UTP Category Definitions 533
  • 14.7.2 Horizontal UTP Cable 534
  • 14.8 Backbone UTP Cabling 535
  • 14.8.1 Transmission Performance Requirements 535
  • 14.8.2 Connecting Hardware for UTP Cable 536
  • 14.9 150-[Omega] Shielded Twisted-Pair Cabling Systems 538
  • 14.9.1 Transmission Performance Requirements 538
  • 14.10 Optical Fiber Cabling Systems 539
  • 14.10.1 Backbone Optical Fiber Cable 540
  • 14.11 Grounding and Bonding Infrastructure for Commercial Buildings 541
  • 14.11.1 Rationale 541
  • 14.11.2 Telecommunications Bonding Backbone (TBB) 542
  • 14.11.3 Telecommunications Main Grounding Busbar (TMGB) 543
  • 14.11.4 Telecommunications Grounding Busbar (TGB) 544
  • 14.11.5 Bonding to the Metal Frame of a Building 544
  • 14.11.6 Telecommunications Entrance Facility (TEF) 545
  • 14.11.7 Telecommunication Closets and Equipment Rooms 546
  • 14.12 Customer-Owned Outside Plant (OSP) Infrastructure 546
  • 14.12.1 OSP Cabling Infrastructure Defined 546
  • 14.12.2 OSP Topology 546
  • 14.12.3 Recognized Cable Media and Media Selection 548
  • Chapter 15 Broadband Data Transport Techniques 551
  • 15.2 Introduction to Fiber-Optics Transmission 552
  • 15.2.1 What Is So Good About Fiber-Optic Transmission? 552
  • 15.2.2 Advantages of Optical Fiber 553
  • 15.2.3 Overview of an Optical Fiber Link 554
  • 15.2.4 Optical Fiber Transmission 555
  • 15.2.5 Types of Optical Fiber 562
  • 15.2.6 Fiber-Optic Cable 563
  • 15.2.7 Fiber-Optic Transmitters 564
  • 15.2.8 Receivers 566
  • 15.2.9 Repeaters 568
  • 15.2.10 Fiber-Optic Amplifiers 568
  • 15.2.11 Joining of Fibers: Splices and Connectors 569
  • 15.2.12 Modulation and Coding 569
  • 15.3 Higher-Order Multiplexing Formats: SONET and SDH 571
  • 15.3.1 Synchronous Optical Network (SONET) 571
  • 15.3.2 Synchronous Digital Hierarchy 583
  • 15.4 Line-of-Sight Microwave and Millimeter-Wave Transmission Systems 591
  • 15.4.1 Broadband Radio Systems 591
  • 15.4.2 An Overview of Line-of-Sight Microwave 592
  • 15.4.3 Satellite Communications 596
  • Chapter 16 Broadband ISDN (B-ISDN) and the Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM) 601
  • 16.1 Where Are We Going? 601
  • 16.2 Introduction to ATM 602
  • 16.3 User-Network Interface (UNI), Configuration, and Architecture 605
  • 16.4 ATM Cell: Key to Operation 606
  • 16.4.1 ATM Cell Structure 606
  • 16.4.2 Header Error Control Sequence Generation 611
  • 16.4.3 Idle Cells 613
  • 16.5 Cell Delineation and Scrambling 613
  • 16.5.1 Delineation and Scrambling Objectives 613
  • 16.5.2 Cell Delineation Algorithm 614
  • 16.6 ATM Layering and B-ISDN 615
  • 16.6.1 Functions of Individual ATM/B-ISDN Layers 616
  • 16.6.2 ATM Adaptation Layer (AAL) 620
  • 16.7 Services: Connection-Oriented and Connectionless 633
  • 16.7.1 Functional Architecture 633
  • 16.7.2 CLNAP Protocol Data Unit (PDU) Structure and Encoding 635
  • 16.8 Aspects of a B-ISDN/ATM Network 637
  • 16.8.1 ATM Routing and Switching 637
  • 16.9 Signaling Requirements 640
  • 16.9.1 Setup and Release of VCCs 640
  • 16.9.2 Signaling Virtual Channels 640
  • 16.9.3 Metasignaling 641
  • 16.9.4 Practical Signaling Considerations 643
  • 16.10 Quality of Service (QoS) 647
  • 16.10.1 ATM Service Quality Review 647
  • 16.10.3 Cell Transfer Delay 648
  • 16.10.4 Cell Delay Variation 648
  • 16.10.5 Cell Loss Ratio 649
  • 16.10.6 Mean Cell Transfer Delay 649
  • 16.10.7 Cell Error Ratio 649
  • 16.10.8 Severely Errored Cell Block Ratio 650
  • 16.10.9 Cell Misinsertion Rate 650
  • 16.11 Traffic Control and Congestion Control 650
  • 16.11.1 Generic Functions 650
  • 16.11.2 Events, Actions, Time Scales, and Response Times 651
  • 16.11.3 Quality of Service, Network Performance, and Cell Loss Priority 652
  • 16.11.4 Traffic Descriptors and Parameters 653
  • 16.11.5 User-Network Traffic Contract 654
  • 16.12 Transporting ATM Cells 659
  • 16.12.1 In the DS3 Frame 659
  • 16.12.2 DS1 Mapping 660
  • 16.12.3 E1 Mapping 662
  • 16.12.4 Mapping ATM Cells into SDH 665
  • 16.12.5 Mapping ATM Cells into SONET 666
  • 16.12.6 Cell Rates for Various Typical Connections 666
  • 16.13 ATM Operation, Administration, and Maintenance (OAM) 667
  • 16.13.1 OAM Levels in the B-ISDN 667
  • 16.13.2 Mechanisms to Provide OAM Flows 668
  • 16.13.3 ATM Layer Mechanism: F4 and F5 Flows 669
  • 16.13.4 OAM Functions of the Physical Layer 671
  • 16.13.5 OAM Functions of the ATM Layer 671
  • 16.13.6 ATM Layer OAM Cell Format 677
  • Chapter 17 Last-Mile Data Distribution Systems 681
  • 17.1 New Approaches to Outside Plant Distribution 681
  • 17.2 Introducing Last-Mile Distribution Systems 682
  • 17.3 Introduction to CATV 687
  • 17.3.1 Essentials of TV Signal Distribution on a CATV System 688
  • 17.3.2 Extending CATV Coverage Area 690
  • 17.3.3 DOCSIS Specification 692
  • 17.4 Local Multipoint Distribution System (LMDS) 716
  • 17.4.1 Frequency Reuse 718
  • 17.5 Other Methods to Breach the Last Mile 724
  • 17.5.1 Remote Wireless (Radio) Bridges 724
  • 17.5.2 In-Building Wireless Telephone Systems 725
  • Chapter 18 Network Management for Enterprise Networks 727
  • 18.1 What is Network Management? 727
  • 18.2 Bigger Picture 727
  • 18.3 Traditional Breakout by Tasks 728
  • 18.3.1 Fault Management 728
  • 18.3.2 Configuration Management 728
  • 18.3.3 Performance Management 729
  • 18.3.4 Security Management 729
  • 18.3.5 Accounting Management 729
  • 18.4 Survivability--Where Network Management Really Pays 729
  • 18.5 Availabilityo Enhancement--Rapid Troubleshooting 730
  • 18.5.1 Troubleshooting 731
  • 18.6 System Depth--A Network Management Problem 734
  • 18.6.1 Aids in Network Management Provisioning 735
  • 18.6.2 Communication Channels for the Network Management System 739
  • 18.7 An Introduction to Network Management Protocols 739
  • 18.7.1 Two Network Management Protocols 739
  • 18.7.2 An Overview of SNMP 740
  • 18.7.3 SNMP Version 2 746
  • 18.7.4 Common Management Information Protocol (CMIP) 747
  • 18.8 Telecommunications Management Network (TMN) 749
  • 18.8.2 Network Management Functions Carried Out in Upper OSI Layers 751
  • Appendix I Addressing Conventions 757
  • I.1 Transforming Decimal Numbers to Binary Numbers and Transforming Binary Numbers to Decimal Numbering 757
  • I.2 Decimal Digit Representation in IP Addresses 759
  • I.3 Binary, Octal, and Hexadecimal Numbers 761.
Description
xxxi, 825 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.
Notes
Includes bibliographical references and index.
Technical Details
  • Access in Virgo Classic
  • Staff View

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    g| Chapter 1 t| Enterprise Network Environment g| 1 -- g| 1.1 t| Enterprise Networks g| 1 -- g| 1.2 t| Types of Network Topology g| 3 -- g| 1.3 t| Network Access: An Overview g| 6 -- g| 1.4 t| Initial Network Design Considerations g| 7 -- g| 1.5 t| Connection-Oriented and Connectionless Service g| 8 -- g| 1.6 t| Data Protocols: Key to Network Operation g| 8 -- g| 1.6.2 t| Basic Protocol Functions g| 9 -- g| Chapter 2 t| OSI Model and the Data-Link Layer g| 13 -- g| 2.2 t| Layering g| 14 -- g| 2.2.2 t| Basic Structuring Technique g| 14 -- g| 2.3 t| Type and Instance g| 15 -- g| 2.4 t| Possible Sublayers g| 16 -- g| 2.5 t| Data Units g| 17 -- g| 2.6 t| Specific Layers of the OSI Reference Model g| 18 -- g| 2.7 t| Layer Descriptions g| 19 -- g| 2.8 t| Specific Comments on OSI g| 33 -- g| 2.9 t| Discussion of OSI Layers 1-4 g| 34 -- g| 2.9.1 t| Physical Layer (Layer 1) g| 34 -- g| 2.9.2 t| Data-Link Layer (Layer 2) g| 35 -- g| 2.9.3 t| Network Layer (Layer 3) g| 37 -- g| 2.9.4 t| Internet Protocol (IP) and Gateway Layer (Layer 3.5) g| 37 -- g| 2.9.5 t| Transport Layer (Layer 4) g| 38 -- g| 2.10 t| Procedural Versus Electrical g| 39 -- g| 2.10.1 t| Narrative g| 39 -- g| Chapter 3 t| High-Level Data-Link Control (HDLC) Typical Data-Link Layer Protocol g| 41 -- g| 3.2 t| Stations and Configurations g| 42 -- g| 3.3 t| Modes of Operation Used with HDLC g| 43 -- g| 3.4 t| HDLC Frame Structure g| 43 -- g| 3.4.1 t| Sequence Numbering in HDLC g| 45 -- g| 3.4.2 t| Poll/Final Bit g| 47 -- g| 3.4.3 t| Supervisory Frames g| 47 -- g| 3.4.4 t| Unnumbered (U) Frames g| 48 -- g| 3.4.5 t| Information Field g| 48 -- g| 3.4.6 t| Frame Check Sequence (FCS) Field g| 48 -- g| 3.5 t| Commands and Responses g| 49 -- g| 3.5.1 t| Mode-Setting Commands g| 49 -- g| 3.5.2 t| Miscellaneous Commands g| 51 -- g| 3.5.3 t| Responses to Unnumbered Commands g| 51 -- g| 3.6 t| Frame Operation g| 52 -- g| 3.7 t| Error Recovery g| 53 -- g| 3.8 t| Other Station Modes g| 54 -- g| 3.9 t| SDLC Variations with HDLC g| 55 -- g| Chapter 4 t| Data Network Operations g| 57 -- g| 4.2 t| General Requirements for the Interchange of Data g| 57 -- g| 4.3 t| Discussion of Issues and Requirements g| 58 -- g| 4.3.1 t| Pathway(s) Exist(s) g| 58 -- g| 4.3.2 t| Access to the Pathway g| 59 -- g| 4.3.3 t| Directing the Data Messages to Its Intended User(s) g| 59 -- g| 4.3.4 t| Data Urgency g| 59 -- g| 4.3.5 t| Maintenance of Data Integrity g| 60 -- g| 4.4 t| Error Detection Schemes g| 61 -- g| 4.4.1 t| Parity Checks g| 61 -- g| 4.4.2 t| Cyclic Redundancy Check (CRC) g| 62 -- g| 4.5 t| Error Correction Schemes g| 64 -- g| 4.5.1 t| Automatic Repeat Request (ARQ) g| 64 -- g| 4.5.2 t| Forward Error Correction (FEC) g| 65 -- g| 4.6 t| Data Switching g| 67 -- g| 4.6.1 t| Philosophy of "Data Signaling" Versus Telephone Signaling g| 69 -- g| 4.6.2 t| Smart Bridges, Routers, and Switching Hubs g| 71 -- g| Chapter 5 t| Data Transmission I g| 73 -- g| 5.1 t| Electrical Communication of Information g| 73 -- g| 5.2 t| Bit and Binary Transmission of Information g| 73 -- g| 5.3 t| Binary Codes for Data Communication g| 76 -- g| 5.4 t| Electrical Bit Decisions g| 79 -- g| 5.5 t| Electrical Representation of Binary Data g| 82 -- g| 5.5.1 t| Neutral and Polar Waveforms g| 82 -- g| 5.5.2 t| Waveforms and Line Codes g| 83 -- g| 5.6 t| Binary Conventions g| 84 -- g| 5.7 t| Bit-Parallel and Bit-Serial g| 85 -- g| 5.8 t| Baseband g| 86 -- g| 5.9 t| Data Rate g| 87 -- g| 5.9.1 t| Error Rate g| 87 -- g| Chapter 6 t| Data Transmission II g| 89 -- g| 6.1 t| Interpreting a Serial Stream of Bits g| 89 -- g| 6.1.1 t| Problem g| 89 -- g| 6.1.2 t| Start-Stop Transmission g| 89 -- g| 6.1.3 t| Synchronous Transmission g| 91 -- g| 6.2 t| Timing Distortion in a Serial Bit Stream g| 93 -- g| 6.3 t| Transmission of Digital Data g| 94 -- g| 6.3.1 t| Baseband Transmission g| 94 -- g| 6.3.2 t| Transmission of Data over Longer Distances g| 95 -- g| 6.3.3 t| Data Circuit Performance g| 102 -- g| 6.4 t| Interface at the Physical Layer g| 107 -- g| 6.4.2 t| DTE-DCE Interface g| 108 -- g| 6.5 t| Question of Bandwidth g| 116 -- g| 6.5.1 t| Bandwidth Versus Bit Rate g| 116 -- g| 6.5.3 t| First and Second Bandwidth Approximations g| 116 -- g| 6.5.4 t| Shannon g| 117 -- g| Chapter 7 t| Telecommunications Network as a Vehicle for Data Transport g| 121 -- g| 7.1 t| Public Switched Telecommunication Network g| 121 -- g| 7.1.2 t| Access to the PSTN: The Subscriber Network g| 122 -- g| 7.2 t| Introduction to Digital Networks g| 123 -- g| 7.2.2 t| Development of a PCM Signal g| 123 -- g| 7.2.3f t| Concept of Frame g| 131 -- g| 7.2.4 t| Line Code g| 134 -- g| 7.2.5 t| Regenerative Repeaters g| 135 -- g| 7.2.6 t| Higher-Order PCM Multiplex Systems g| 136 -- g| 7.2.7 t| Line Rates and Codes g| 139 -- g| 7.3 t| Brief Overview of Digital Switching g| 139 -- g| 7.3.1 t| Advantages and Issues of PCM Switching g| 139 -- g| 7.3.2 t| Approaches to PCM Switching g| 140 -- g| 7.3.3 t| Time Switch g| 140 -- g| 7.3.4 t| Space Switch g| 142 -- g| 7.3.5 t| Time-Space-Time Switch g| 144 -- g| 7.3.6 t| Space-Time-Space Switch g| 146 -- g| 7.4 t| Digital Network Structure g| 146 -- g| 7.5 t| Digital Network Impairments and Performance Requirements g| 147 -- g| 7.5.1 t| Error Performance g| 147 -- g| 7.5.2 t| Slips g| 147 -- g| 7.6 t| Data Transmission on the Digital Network g| 149 -- g| 7.7 t| Interconnects and Bypass g| 151 -- g| 7.8 t| Bypass in Economically Evolving Nations g| 152 -- g| Chapter 8 t| Transmission of Data over the Analog Voice Channel g| 155 -- g| 8.2 t| Two-Wire Versus Four-Wire Operation g| 156 -- g| 8.2.1 t| What Is Two-Wire and Four-Wire Operation? g| 156 -- g| 8.2.2 t| Two-Wire Transmission g| 156 -- g| 8.2.3 t| Four-Wire Transmission g| 156 -- g| 8.3 t| Echo and Singing: Telecommunication Network Impairments g| 159 -- g| 8.4 t| Amplitude Distortion and Phase Distortion g| 159 -- g| 8.4.2 t| Amplitude Distortion g| 160 -- g| 8.4.3 t| Phase Distortion g| 160 -- g| 8.4.4 t| Conditioning and Equalization g| 161 -- g| 8.5 t| Data Modems g| 165 -- g| 8.5.1 t| Where We Are and Where We Are Going g| 165 -- g| 8.5.2 t| Getting More Bits per Hertz g| 165 -- g| 8.5.3 t| Specific High-Speed Modems g| 168 -- g| 8.5.4 t| Scrambling and Its Rationale g| 174 -- g| 8.5.5 t| Introduction to Trellis-Coded Modulation (TCM) g| 176 -- g| 8.5.6 t| V.34 Modem: 28,8000 bps and 33,600 bps g| 178 -- g| 8.5.7 t| V.90 Modem--Maximum Data Rate: 56 kbps g| 187 -- g| Chapter 9 t| Data Communications in the Office Environment, Part 1 g| 203 -- g| 9.2 t| Distinguishing Characteristics of LANs g| 204 -- g| 9.3 t| How LAN Protocols Relate to OSI g| 206 -- g| 9.4 t| Logical Link Control (LLC) g| 206 -- g| 9.4.1 t| LLC Sublayer Services and Primitives g| 208 -- g| 9.4.2 t| LLC PDU Structure g| 211 -- g| 9.5 t| Medium Access Control (MAC) g| 223 -- g| 9.5.2 t| Carrier Sense Multiple Access with Collision Detection (CSMA/CD) g| 223 -- g| 9.6 t| CSMA/CD--Current Status and Advanced Operation g| 232 -- g| 9.6.2 t| Half-Duplex and Full-Duplex g| 232 -- g| 9.6.3 t| Compatability Interfaces--Physical Layer g| 232 -- g| 9.6.4 t| Layer Interface Requirements g| 236 -- g| 9.6.5 t| Allowable Implementations--Parameterized Values g| 238 -- g| 9.6.6 t| Physical Signaling (PLS) and Attachment Unit Interface (AUI)--Selected Discussion g| 240 -- g| 9.6.7 t| System Configurations for Multisegment 10-Mbps Baseband Networks g| 249 -- g| 9.7 t| 100-Mbps CSMA/CD Baseband Networks g| 252 -- g| 9.7.1 t| Overview--Key Points g| 252 -- g| 9.7.2 t| Reconciliation Sublayer (RS) and Media-Independent Interface (MII)--Description Details g| 256 -- g| 9.7.3 t| 100BASE-T4, Its PMA, and PCS g| 261 -- g| 9.7.4 t| Physical Coding Sublayer (PCS) and Physical Medium Attachment (PMA) Sublayer, Type 100BASE-X g| 264 -- g| 9.7.5 t| System Considerations for Multisegment 100BASE-T Networks g| 271 -- g| 9.8 t| 1000-Mbps CSMA/CD Networks g| 274 -- g| 9.8.2 t| Reconciliation Sublayer (RS) and Gigabit Media-Independent Interface (GMII) g| 276 -- g| 9.8.3 t| Physical Coding Sublayer (PCS) and Physical Medium Attachment (PMA) Sublayer, 1000BASE-X g| 277 -- g| 9.8.4 t| System Considerations for Multisegment 1000-Mbps Networks g| 283 -- g| Chapter 10 t| Data Communications in the Office Environment, Part 2 g| 289 -- g| 10.1 t| Medium Access Control--Token-Passing Schemes g| 289 -- g| 10.1.2 t| Token-Passing Bus g| 290 -- g| 10.1.3 t| Token-Passing Ring g| 293 -- g| 10.1.4 t| Fiber Distributed Data Interface (FDDI) g| 308 -- g| 10.1.5 t| Wireless LANs (WLANs) g| 316 -- g| 10.2 t| Repeaters, Bridges, Routers, and Hubs g| 335 -- g| 10.2.1 t| Definitions and Interactions g| 335 -- g| 10.3 t| LAN Bridges--Overview g| 335 -- g| 10.3.2 t| Source Routing Bridges g| 352 -- g| 10.3.3 t| Remote Bridges g| 354 -- g| 10.4 t| Hubs and Switching Hubs g| 355 -- g| 10.4.1 t| Rationale and Function g| 355 -- g| 10.4.2 t| Improvements in Hub Technology g| 355 -- g| 10.5 t| Routers g| 356 -- g| 10.5.1 t| Addressing with Hierarchical Significance g| 356 -- g| 10.5.2 t| Subnet Masks g| 358 -- g| 10.6 t| Virtual Local Area Networks (VLANs) g| 358 -- g| 10.7 t| Servers and Intranets g| 359 -- g| 10.7.1 t| Servers g| 359 -- g| 10.7.2 t| Intranet and Extranet g| 360 -- g| Chapter 11 t| Wide Area Networks (WANs) g| 363 -- g| 11.1 t| Background and Scope g| 363 -- g| 11.2 t| Basic Approaches g| 364 -- g| 11.2.1 t| Point-to-Point Links g| 364 -- g| 11.2.2 t| Data Multiplexers and Statmultiplexers g| 366 -- g| 11.3 t| Packet Networks for Data Communication g| 367 -- g| 11.3.1 t| Introduction to Packet Data g| 367 -- g| 11.3.2 t| Packet-Switched and Virtual Connections Based on ITU-T Rec. X.25 g| 369 -- g| 11.4 t| Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) g| 386 -- g| 11.4.1 t| Background and Application g| 386 -- g| 11.4.2 t| TCP/IP and Data-Link Layers g| 387 -- g| 11.4.3 t| IP Routing Function g| 390 -- g| 11.4.4 t| Detailed IP Operation g| 391 -- g| 11.4.5 t| Transmission Control Protocol g| 402 -- g| 11.4.6 t| Internet Protocol Version 6 (IPv6) g| 410 -- g| 11.5 t| User Datagram Protocol (UDP) g| 414 -- g| 11.5.1 t| UDP Header Format and Fields g| 414 -- g| 11.6 t| CLNP Protocol Based on ISO 8473 g| 415 -- g| 11.6.1 t| CLNP Frame Formats g| 416 -- g| 11.6.2 t| Frame Field Description--Fixed Part g| 416 -- g| 11.6.3 t| Error Report PDU (ER) g| 423 -- g| 11.7 t| Networking via VSATs g| 424 -- g| 11.7.1 t| Rationale of VSAT Networks g| 424 -- g| 11.7.2 t| Basic Description of a VSAT Network g| 425 -- g| 11.7.3 t| Disadvantages of a VSAT Network g| 425 -- g| 11.7.4 t| Important Design Variables g| 427 -- g| 11.8 t| Hypothetical Reference Connections for Public Synchronous Data Networks g| 430 -- g| Chapter 12 t| Frame Relay g| 433 -- g| 12.1 t| How Can Networks Be Speeded Up? g| 433 -- g| 12.1.1 t| Genesis of Frame Relay g| 435 -- g| 12.2 t| Introduction to Frame Relay g| 436 -- g| 12.2.1 t| Frame Structure g| 437 -- g| 12.2.2 t| Address Field Discussion g| 441 -- g| 12.3 t| DL-CORE Parameters (As Defined by ANSI) g| 444 -- g| 12.3.1 t| Procedures g| 444 -- g| 12.4 t| Traffic and Billing on Frame Relay g| 445 -- g| 12.5 t| PVCs and SVCs g| 446 --
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    g| 12.6 t| Two Types of Interfaces: UNI and NNI g| 446 -- g| 12.7 t| Congestion Control: A Discussion g| 447 -- g| 12.7.1 t| Network Response to Congestion g| 448 -- g| 12.7.2 t| User Response to Congestion g| 448 -- g| 12.7.3 t| Consolidated Link Layer Management (CLLM) Messages g| 449 -- g| 12.7.4 t| Action of a Congested Node g| 452 -- g| 12.8 t| Flow Control and Possible Applications of FECN and BECN Bits g| 453 -- g| 12.8.1 t| FECN Usage g| 453 -- g| 12.8.2 t| BECN Usage g| 454 -- g| 12.9 t| Policing a Frame Relay Network g| 455 -- g| 12.9.3 t| Relationship Among Parameters g| 456 -- g| 12.10 t| Quality of Service Parameters g| 458 -- g| 12.11 t| Network Responsibilities g| 459 -- g| 12.12 t| Frame Relay Signalling Functions g| 460 -- g| 12.12.1 t| PVC Management Procedures g| 461 -- g| 12.12.2 t| Signaling Required for SVCs g| 468 -- g| 12.13 t| Compatibility Issues g| 474 -- g| Chapter 13 t| Integrated Services Digital Networks (ISDNs) g| 483 -- g| 13.2 t| ISDN Structures g| 483 -- g| 13.2.1 t| ISDN User Channels g| 483 -- g| 13.2.2 t| Basic and Primary Rate Interfaces g| 484 -- g| 13.3 t| User Access and Interface g| 485 -- g| 13.4 t| ISDN Protocols and Protocol Issues g| 488 -- g| 13.5 t| ISDN Networks g| 490 -- g| 13.6 t| ISDN Protocol Structures g| 493 -- g| 13.6.1 t| ISDN and OSI g| 493 -- g| 13.6.2 t| Layer 1 Interface, Basic Rate (CCITT) g| 494 -- g| 13.6.3 t| Layer 1 Interface, Primary Rate g| 500 -- g| 13.7 t| Overview of Layer 2 Interface: Link Access Procedure for the D Channel (LAPD) g| 505 -- g| 13.7.1 t| Layer 2 Frame Structure for Peer-to-Peer Communication g| 509 -- g| 13.8 t| Overview of Layer 3 g| 514 -- g| 13.8.1 t| Layer 3 Specification g| 516 -- g| 13.9 t| ISDN Packet Mode Review g| 520 -- g| 13.9.2 t| Case A: Configuration When Accessing PSPDN Services g| 520 -- g| 13.9.3 t| Case B: Configuration for the ISDN Virtual Circuit Service g| 521 -- g| 13.9.4 t| Service Aspects g| 523 -- g| Chapter 14 t| Building and Campus Wiring and Cabling for Data Communications g| 527 -- g| 14.2 t| Major Elements of Telecommunication Building Layout g| 528 -- g| 14.3 t| Horizontal Cabling g| 528 -- g| 14.3.1 t| Selection of Media g| 529 -- g| 14.4 t| Backbone Cabling g| 530 -- g| 14.4.1 t| Topology of Backbone Cabling g| 530 -- g| 14.4.2 t| Selecting Cable Media g| 530 -- g| 14.5 t| Telecommunication Closets g| 532 -- g| 14.5.1 t| Cabling Practices g| 532 -- g| 14.6 t| Entrance Facilities g| 533 -- g| 14.7 t| 100-[Omega] Unshielded Twisted-Pair (UTP) Cabling Systems g| 533 -- g| 14.7.1 t| UTP Category Definitions g| 533 -- g| 14.7.2 t| Horizontal UTP Cable g| 534 -- g| 14.8 t| Backbone UTP Cabling g| 535 -- g| 14.8.1 t| Transmission Performance Requirements g| 535 -- g| 14.8.2 t| Connecting Hardware for UTP Cable g| 536 -- g| 14.9 t| 150-[Omega] Shielded Twisted-Pair Cabling Systems g| 538 -- g| 14.9.1 t| Transmission Performance Requirements g| 538 -- g| 14.10 t| Optical Fiber Cabling Systems g| 539 -- g| 14.10.1 t| Backbone Optical Fiber Cable g| 540 -- g| 14.11 t| Grounding and Bonding Infrastructure for Commercial Buildings g| 541 -- g| 14.11.1 t| Rationale g| 541 -- g| 14.11.2 t| Telecommunications Bonding Backbone (TBB) g| 542 -- g| 14.11.3 t| Telecommunications Main Grounding Busbar (TMGB) g| 543 -- g| 14.11.4 t| Telecommunications Grounding Busbar (TGB) g| 544 -- g| 14.11.5 t| Bonding to the Metal Frame of a Building g| 544 -- g| 14.11.6 t| Telecommunications Entrance Facility (TEF) g| 545 -- g| 14.11.7 t| Telecommunication Closets and Equipment Rooms g| 546 -- g| 14.12 t| Customer-Owned Outside Plant (OSP) Infrastructure g| 546 -- g| 14.12.1 t| OSP Cabling Infrastructure Defined g| 546 -- g| 14.12.2 t| OSP Topology g| 546 -- g| 14.12.3 t| Recognized Cable Media and Media Selection g| 548 -- g| Chapter 15 t| Broadband Data Transport Techniques g| 551 -- g| 15.2 t| Introduction to Fiber-Optics Transmission g| 552 -- g| 15.2.1 t| What Is So Good About Fiber-Optic Transmission? g| 552 -- g| 15.2.2 t| Advantages of Optical Fiber g| 553 -- g| 15.2.3 t| Overview of an Optical Fiber Link g| 554 -- g| 15.2.4 t| Optical Fiber Transmission g| 555 -- g| 15.2.5 t| Types of Optical Fiber g| 562 -- g| 15.2.6 t| Fiber-Optic Cable g| 563 -- g| 15.2.7 t| Fiber-Optic Transmitters g| 564 -- g| 15.2.8 t| Receivers g| 566 -- g| 15.2.9 t| Repeaters g| 568 -- g| 15.2.10 t| Fiber-Optic Amplifiers g| 568 -- g| 15.2.11 t| Joining of Fibers: Splices and Connectors g| 569 -- g| 15.2.12 t| Modulation and Coding g| 569 -- g| 15.3 t| Higher-Order Multiplexing Formats: SONET and SDH g| 571 -- g| 15.3.1 t| Synchronous Optical Network (SONET) g| 571 -- g| 15.3.2 t| Synchronous Digital Hierarchy g| 583 -- g| 15.4 t| Line-of-Sight Microwave and Millimeter-Wave Transmission Systems g| 591 -- g| 15.4.1 t| Broadband Radio Systems g| 591 -- g| 15.4.2 t| An Overview of Line-of-Sight Microwave g| 592 -- g| 15.4.3 t| Satellite Communications g| 596 -- g| Chapter 16 t| Broadband ISDN (B-ISDN) and the Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM) g| 601 -- g| 16.1 t| Where Are We Going? g| 601 -- g| 16.2 t| Introduction to ATM g| 602 -- g| 16.3 t| User-Network Interface (UNI), Configuration, and Architecture g| 605 -- g| 16.4 t| ATM Cell: Key to Operation g| 606 -- g| 16.4.1 t| ATM Cell Structure g| 606 -- g| 16.4.2 t| Header Error Control Sequence Generation g| 611 -- g| 16.4.3 t| Idle Cells g| 613 -- g| 16.5 t| Cell Delineation and Scrambling g| 613 -- g| 16.5.1 t| Delineation and Scrambling Objectives g| 613 -- g| 16.5.2 t| Cell Delineation Algorithm g| 614 -- g| 16.6 t| ATM Layering and B-ISDN g| 615 -- g| 16.6.1 t| Functions of Individual ATM/B-ISDN Layers g| 616 -- g| 16.6.2 t| ATM Adaptation Layer (AAL) g| 620 -- g| 16.7 t| Services: Connection-Oriented and Connectionless g| 633 -- g| 16.7.1 t| Functional Architecture g| 633 -- g| 16.7.2 t| CLNAP Protocol Data Unit (PDU) Structure and Encoding g| 635 -- g| 16.8 t| Aspects of a B-ISDN/ATM Network g| 637 -- g| 16.8.1 t| ATM Routing and Switching g| 637 -- g| 16.9 t| Signaling Requirements g| 640 -- g| 16.9.1 t| Setup and Release of VCCs g| 640 -- g| 16.9.2 t| Signaling Virtual Channels g| 640 -- g| 16.9.3 t| Metasignaling g| 641 -- g| 16.9.4 t| Practical Signaling Considerations g| 643 -- g| 16.10 t| Quality of Service (QoS) g| 647 -- g| 16.10.1 t| ATM Service Quality Review g| 647 -- g| 16.10.3 t| Cell Transfer Delay g| 648 -- g| 16.10.4 t| Cell Delay Variation g| 648 -- g| 16.10.5 t| Cell Loss Ratio g| 649 -- g| 16.10.6 t| Mean Cell Transfer Delay g| 649 -- g| 16.10.7 t| Cell Error Ratio g| 649 -- g| 16.10.8 t| Severely Errored Cell Block Ratio g| 650 -- g| 16.10.9 t| Cell Misinsertion Rate g| 650 -- g| 16.11 t| Traffic Control and Congestion Control g| 650 -- g| 16.11.1 t| Generic Functions g| 650 -- g| 16.11.2 t| Events, Actions, Time Scales, and Response Times g| 651 -- g| 16.11.3 t| Quality of Service, Network Performance, and Cell Loss Priority g| 652 -- g| 16.11.4 t| Traffic Descriptors and Parameters g| 653 -- g| 16.11.5 t| User-Network Traffic Contract g| 654 -- g| 16.12 t| Transporting ATM Cells g| 659 -- g| 16.12.1 t| In the DS3 Frame g| 659 -- g| 16.12.2 t| DS1 Mapping g| 660 -- g| 16.12.3 t| E1 Mapping g| 662 -- g| 16.12.4 t| Mapping ATM Cells into SDH g| 665 -- g| 16.12.5 t| Mapping ATM Cells into SONET g| 666 -- g| 16.12.6 t| Cell Rates for Various Typical Connections g| 666 -- g| 16.13 t| ATM Operation, Administration, and Maintenance (OAM) g| 667 -- g| 16.13.1 t| OAM Levels in the B-ISDN g| 667 -- g| 16.13.2 t| Mechanisms to Provide OAM Flows g| 668 -- g| 16.13.3 t| ATM Layer Mechanism: F4 and F5 Flows g| 669 -- g| 16.13.4 t| OAM Functions of the Physical Layer g| 671 -- g| 16.13.5 t| OAM Functions of the ATM Layer g| 671 -- g| 16.13.6 t| ATM Layer OAM Cell Format g| 677 -- g| Chapter 17 t| Last-Mile Data Distribution Systems g| 681 -- g| 17.1 t| New Approaches to Outside Plant Distribution g| 681 -- g| 17.2 t| Introducing Last-Mile Distribution Systems g| 682 -- g| 17.3 t| Introduction to CATV g| 687 -- g| 17.3.1 t| Essentials of TV Signal Distribution on a CATV System g| 688 -- g| 17.3.2 t| Extending CATV Coverage Area g| 690 -- g| 17.3.3 t| DOCSIS Specification g| 692 -- g| 17.4 t| Local Multipoint Distribution System (LMDS) g| 716 -- g| 17.4.1 t| Frequency Reuse g| 718 -- g| 17.5 t| Other Methods to Breach the Last Mile g| 724 -- g| 17.5.1 t| Remote Wireless (Radio) Bridges g| 724 -- g| 17.5.2 t| In-Building Wireless Telephone Systems g| 725 -- g| Chapter 18 t| Network Management for Enterprise Networks g| 727 -- g| 18.1 t| What is Network Management? g| 727 -- g| 18.2 t| Bigger Picture g| 727 -- g| 18.3 t| Traditional Breakout by Tasks g| 728 -- g| 18.3.1 t| Fault Management g| 728 -- g| 18.3.2 t| Configuration Management g| 728 -- g| 18.3.3 t| Performance Management g| 729 -- g| 18.3.4 t| Security Management g| 729 -- g| 18.3.5 t| Accounting Management g| 729 -- g| 18.4 t| Survivability--Where Network Management Really Pays g| 729 -- g| 18.5 t| Availabilityo Enhancement--Rapid Troubleshooting g| 730 -- g| 18.5.1 t| Troubleshooting g| 731 -- g| 18.6 t| System Depth--A Network Management Problem g| 734 -- g| 18.6.1 t| Aids in Network Management Provisioning g| 735 -- g| 18.6.2 t| Communication Channels for the Network Management System g| 739 -- g| 18.7 t| An Introduction to Network Management Protocols g| 739 -- g| 18.7.1 t| Two Network Management Protocols g| 739 -- g| 18.7.2 t| An Overview of SNMP g| 740 -- g| 18.7.3 t| SNMP Version 2 g| 746 -- g| 18.7.4 t| Common Management Information Protocol (CMIP) g| 747 -- g| 18.8 t| Telecommunications Management Network (TMN) g| 749 -- g| 18.8.2 t| Network Management Functions Carried Out in Upper OSI Layers g| 751 -- g| Appendix I t| Addressing Conventions g| 757 -- g| I.1 t| Transforming Decimal Numbers to Binary Numbers and Transforming Binary Numbers to Decimal Numbering g| 757 -- g| I.2 t| Decimal Digit Representation in IP Addresses g| 759 -- g| I.3 t| Binary, Octal, and Hexadecimal Numbers g| 761.
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    a| TK5105 .F72 2001 w| LC i| X004475673 l| STACKS m| SCI-ENG t| BOOK
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