Item Details

Wireless Intelligent Networking

Gerry Christensen, Paul G. Florack, Robert Duncan
Format
Book
Published
Boston, MA : Artech House, 2001.
Language
English
Series
Artech House Mobile Communications Library
ISBN
1580530842 (alk. paper)
Contents
  • Part 1 Introduction to Mobile Communications, Network Signaling, and Intelligent Networking
  • 1 Fundamentals of Mobile Communications 3
  • 1.1 Personal Communications Concept 4
  • 1.2 Origins of Radio Technology 5
  • 1.3 Evolution of Mobile Communications 7
  • 1.4 Fundamental Mobile Communications Concepts 9
  • 1.4.1 Electromagnetic Waves 9
  • 1.4.2 Bandwidth 10
  • 1.4.3 Modulation 10
  • 1.4.4 Frequency Reuse 11
  • 1.4.5 Multiplexing 11
  • 1.4.6 Radio Technology 11
  • 1.5 Wireless System Architecture 15
  • 1.5.1 Mobile Switching Center 15
  • 1.5.2 Mobile Station 16
  • 1.5.3 Cell Site 16
  • 1.5.4 Frequency Reuse Implementations 17
  • 1.5.5 Handoff 17
  • 1.5.6 Mobility Management 18
  • 1.6 Wireless Service Implementations 19
  • 1.6.1 Government Frequency Allocation 19
  • 1.6.2 Carriers and Technology 22
  • 1.6.3 Mobile Communications Technology Evolution 22
  • 1.6.4 Wireless Intelligent Networking 23
  • 2 Mobile Communications Standards 25
  • 2.1 Purpose of Standards 25
  • 2.2 Standards Groups and Related Organizations 26
  • 2.2.1 International Standardization 26
  • 2.2.2 National and Regional Standardization 27
  • 2.2.3 Trade and Special Interest Groups 29
  • 2.2.4 GSM Association 30
  • 2.2.5 GSM Alliance 30
  • 2.2.6 Standardization for Mobile Packet Data Environment 31
  • 2.2.7 Mobile Wireless Internet Forum 32
  • 2.2.8 Joint Initiative toward Mobile Multimedia 32
  • 2.2.9 Wireless Data Development Groups 32
  • 2.3 Overview of the Standards Creation Process 33
  • 2.3.1 Structure and Organization 33
  • 2.3.2 TIA Committee TR45 34
  • 2.3.3 SMG 35
  • 2.3.4 Three Stage Specification Process 35
  • 2.3.5 Standards Acceptance Process 36
  • 2.4 Radio Technology Standards 36
  • 2.4.1 NMT 37
  • 2.4.2 TACS 37
  • 2.4.3 AMPS 38
  • 2.4.4 D-AMPS 38
  • 2.4.5 CDMA 38
  • 2.4.6 GSM 38
  • 2.4.7 PDC 39
  • 2.4.8 ESMR 39
  • 2.4.9 Satellite Technologies 39
  • 2.5 Mobile Network Standards 40
  • 2.5.1 ANSI-41 41
  • 2.5.2 GSM MAP 41
  • 2.5.3 ANSI-41 versus GSM MAP 41
  • 2.6 Wireless Intelligent Networking Standards 43
  • 2.6.1 WIN 44
  • 2.6.2 CAMEL 44
  • 2.7 Evolution to Third-Generation Wireless Standards 44
  • 2.7.1 HSCSD 46
  • 2.7.2 GPRS 46
  • 2.7.3 EDGE 46
  • 2.7.4 W-CDMA 46
  • 2.7.5 Summary of Third-Generation Wireless Standards 47
  • 3 Wireless Signaling and Intelligent Networking 49
  • 3.1 Overview of SS7 Network Signaling 50
  • 3.1.1 What Is Signaling? 50
  • 3.1.2 Common Channel Signaling 51
  • 3.1.3 Signaling Services 52
  • 3.2 Physical SS7 Network 54
  • 3.2.1 Service Switching Points 55
  • 3.2.2 Signal Control Point 56
  • 3.2.3 Signal Transfer Point 56
  • 3.2.4 Signaling Links 57
  • 3.2.5 SS7 Network Deployments 60
  • 3.3 SS7 Protocols 61
  • 3.3.1 OSI Reference Model 61
  • 3.3.2 Message Transfer Part 63
  • 3.3.3 SCCP 67
  • 3.3.4 Upper Layers 70
  • 3.4 Signaling in a Wireless Network 75
  • 3.4.1 Wireless Network Elements 76
  • 3.4.2 Wireless Network Reference Models 78
  • 3.4.3 MAP 79
  • 3.4.4 Mobility Management 80
  • 3.5 Intelligent Networking 88
  • 3.5.1 Call Control 88
  • 3.5.2 Service-Independent Architecture 88
  • 3.5.3 Service Creation 89
  • 3.5.4 IN Modeling 89
  • Part 2 Evolution of Wireless Intelligent Networking Technology
  • 4 Evolution of Wireless Intelligent Networking 93
  • 4.1 Origins of Intelligent Networking 93
  • 4.1.1 Automatic Switching 94
  • 4.1.2 Stored Program Control 95
  • 4.1.3 Common Channel Signaling 95
  • 4.1.4 Intelligent Network 97
  • 4.1.5 Advanced Intelligent Network 98
  • 4.2 Wireless Intelligent Networking 98
  • 4.2.1 Wireless Intelligent Networking versus WIN 99
  • 4.2.2 WIN 100
  • 4.2.3 CAMEL 104
  • 4.3 Relationship of Wireless Intelligent Networking Standards 105
  • 4.4 Migration from Point3 Solutions to Network-Based Solutions 105
  • 4.4.1 Impetus for Migration 106
  • 4.4.2 Advantages of Network-Based Solutions 106
  • 4.4.3 Operational Challenges of Network-Based Solutions 107
  • 5 Wireless Intelligent Networking Capabilities 109
  • 5.1 Intelligence in Telecommunications Networks 109
  • 5.1.1 Fixed Network Intelligence 110
  • 5.1.2 Mobile Network Intelligence 110
  • 5.1.3 Drivers for Improved Mobile Network Intelligence 110
  • 5.2 Standardized Intelligence for Mobile Networks: WIN and CAMEL 111
  • 5.2.1 Enabling Architecture and Standardized Capabilities 111
  • 5.2.2 Phased Development of Standards 111
  • 5.3 Wireless Intelligent Network 112
  • 5.3.1 Pre-WIN 113
  • 5.3.2 WIN Phase I 113
  • 5.3.3 WIN Phase II 122
  • 5.3.4 WIN Phase III 126
  • 5.3.5 Service and Feature Support Between Incompatible Networks 128
  • 5.3.6 Summary of WIN 130
  • 5.4 Customized Applications for Mobile Enhanced Logic 131
  • 5.4.1 CAMEL Phase I 132
  • 5.4.2 CAMEL Phase II 133
  • 5.4.3 CAMEL Trigger Detection Points 133
  • 5.4.4 Service and Feature Support Between Incompatible Networks 133
  • 5.4.5 Summary of CAMEL 136
  • 5.5 WIN and CAMEL Implementation Issues 137
  • 5.6 WIN and CAMEL Operational Issues 138
  • Part 3 Mobile Communications Business Issues
  • 6 Mobile Market Environment and Trends 143
  • 6.1 Competition 143
  • 6.1.1 More Carriers = Greater Choice for Consumers 143
  • 6.1.2 Downward Price Pressure = Lower Revenue per Unit 144
  • 6.1.3 Consolidation and Alliances 146
  • 6.1.4 Need for Differentiation 147
  • 6.1.5 Who Owns the Customer Anyway? 147
  • 6.2 Technological Advancement 148
  • 6.2.1 Radio 148
  • 6.2.2 Switching 154
  • 6.2.3 Networking 155
  • 6.2.4 Network Intelligence 158
  • 6.3 Consumer Behavior and Enterprise Needs 158
  • 6.3.1 Personal Communications 159
  • 6.3.2 Need for Mobility 159
  • 6.3.3 Greater Usage and Dependence 160
  • 6.3.4 Calling Patterns 160
  • 6.3.5 Wireless/Wireline Integration 162
  • 6.3.6 Increased Desire for Control 162
  • 6.3.7 Access and Control of Information, Content, and Transactions 163
  • 6.3.8 Electronic Commerce 165
  • 6.3.9 Enhanced and Value-Added Services 166
  • 6.3.10 Expectations of Greater Value 166
  • 6.4 Regulation 167
  • 6.4.1 Regulatory Bodies 167
  • 6.4.2 Regulatory Developments 167
  • 6.4.3 Effect on Wireless Intelligent Networking 168
  • 7 Creating Market and Product/Service Value 171
  • 7.1 Value-Added Products and Services 171
  • 7.2 Basic Issues 172
  • 7.2.1 Market Needs and Readiness 173
  • 7.2.2 Development Capability 173
  • 7.2.3 Realization of Return on Investment Needs 173
  • 7.2.4 Product/Service Economic Analysis 174
  • 7.2.5 Product Development Process 177
  • 7.2.6 Product Development Process Example 180
  • 7.3 Technology Availability 180
  • 7.3.1 Standards 182
  • 7.3.2 Application Development 183
  • 7.3.3 Network Element Readiness 183
  • 7.3.4 Spectrum Availability 185
  • 7.4 Strategy Formulation 185
  • 7.4.1 Focus in a Defined Area 185
  • 7.4.2 Market Strategy 186
  • 7.4.3 Promote Value and Loyalty through Effective Business Processes 187
  • 7.4.4 Gain and Retain Market Share 188
  • 7.4.5 Leverage Emerging Capabilities for Many Services/Features 188
  • 7.5 Pre-WIN/CAMEL Alternatives 189
  • 7.5.1 Proprietary Solutions Based on TCAP Signaling 189
  • 7.5.2 ISUP-Based Call Control Solutions 190
  • 7.6 In-House Versus Outsource 191
  • 7.6.1 Vendor Solutions 192
  • 7.6.2 Application Development 192
  • 7.6.3 Wholesale Service Alternatives 192
  • Part 4 Leveraging Intelligence for Improved Network Capabilities and Advanced Services
  • 8 Evolution of Wireless IN Services: From Emulation to Differentiation 199
  • 8.1 Intelligent Network Solutions to Wireless Fraud 200
  • 8.1.1 Pre-Call Validation 201
  • 8.1.2 Cloningn Fraud 201
  • 8.1.3 Detection via ANSI-41 Messaging 201
  • 8.1.4 Roamer Verification and Reinstatement (RVR) 202
  • 8.1.5 Authentication 203
  • 8.2 Network-Based HLR 206
  • 8.2.1 Initial Rationale and Benefit of Deployment 207
  • 8.2.2 Deployment Issues: Feature Availability 208
  • 8.2.3 Deployment Issues: Operational Concerns 208
  • 8.2.4 Long-Term Strategic Advantages 209
  • 8.3 Wireless Adds Wireline Services 209
  • 8.3.1 Emulation of Basic Wireline Features, IS-53 Standardizes Look and Feel 210
  • 8.3.2 Emulation of Wireline IN Services 211
  • 8.3.3 Integration of Wireline + Wireless Services ("Fixed/Mobile Convergence") 229
  • 8.4 Wireless-Specific Services Emerge 251
  • 8.4.1 Messaging 251
  • 8.4.2 Location Technology and Services 255
  • 8.5 Wireless Data 269
  • 8.5.1 Emergence of Data Prominence 269
  • 8.5.2 WIN Must Evolve to Encompass Internet-Based Services 270
  • 8.5.3 A New View of Network Intelligence (SCPs and Web Servers) 270
  • 8.5.4 Access to Web Information = Unlimited Applications 271
  • 8.5.5 Information Acess (Circuit- and Packet-Switched Access) 273
  • 8.5.6 Third-Generation (3G) Wireless Technology 274
  • 8.5.7 Electronic Commerce 275
  • 9 Evolution of WIN Architecture: Embracing the Internet and Data Services 279
  • 9.1 Trends for Next-Generation Networks: Convergent IN + IP Technologies 281
  • 9.1.1 Industry Trends 281
  • 9.1.2 Networking Requirements for a Converging Voice/Data Network 282
  • 9.2 Hybrid IN + IP Networks 284
  • 9.2.1 Convergence of IN (SS7) and IP Signaling 285
  • 9.2.2 PINT: IP Subscriber Services Adding IN Telephony Services (IP [left arrow] IN), Yielding a hybrid IP + IN Service 292
  • 9.2.3 SPIRITS: IN Subscriber Services Adding IP Services (IN [left arrow] IP), Yielding a Hybrid IN + IP Service 293
  • -- 9.2.4 IP Telephony: IP Subscribers Inherit IN Telephony Services (IP [left arrow] IN), Yielding an IP-Based Telephony Service 297
  • 9.2.5 IN Access to IP-Based Service Logic--WAP Services as an Alternative to WIN 305
  • 9.3 Open Service Creation 308
  • 9.3.1 Promise of Competitive Applications Market 308
  • Appendix A Intelligent Networking Architecture and Design Concepts 313
  • Appendix B Mobile Communications and Internet Organizations 335.
Description
xxviii, 418 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
Notes
Includes bibliographical references (p. 399-402) and index.
Technical Details
  • Access in Virgo Classic

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    g| Part 1 t| Introduction to Mobile Communications, Network Signaling, and Intelligent Networking -- g| 1 t| Fundamentals of Mobile Communications g| 3 -- g| 1.1 t| Personal Communications Concept g| 4 -- g| 1.2 t| Origins of Radio Technology g| 5 -- g| 1.3 t| Evolution of Mobile Communications g| 7 -- g| 1.4 t| Fundamental Mobile Communications Concepts g| 9 -- g| 1.4.1 t| Electromagnetic Waves g| 9 -- g| 1.4.2 t| Bandwidth g| 10 -- g| 1.4.3 t| Modulation g| 10 -- g| 1.4.4 t| Frequency Reuse g| 11 -- g| 1.4.5 t| Multiplexing g| 11 -- g| 1.4.6 t| Radio Technology g| 11 -- g| 1.5 t| Wireless System Architecture g| 15 -- g| 1.5.1 t| Mobile Switching Center g| 15 -- g| 1.5.2 t| Mobile Station g| 16 -- g| 1.5.3 t| Cell Site g| 16 -- g| 1.5.4 t| Frequency Reuse Implementations g| 17 -- g| 1.5.5 t| Handoff g| 17 -- g| 1.5.6 t| Mobility Management g| 18 -- g| 1.6 t| Wireless Service Implementations g| 19 -- g| 1.6.1 t| Government Frequency Allocation g| 19 -- g| 1.6.2 t| Carriers and Technology g| 22 -- g| 1.6.3 t| Mobile Communications Technology Evolution g| 22 -- g| 1.6.4 t| Wireless Intelligent Networking g| 23 -- g| 2 t| Mobile Communications Standards g| 25 -- g| 2.1 t| Purpose of Standards g| 25 -- g| 2.2 t| Standards Groups and Related Organizations g| 26 -- g| 2.2.1 t| International Standardization g| 26 -- g| 2.2.2 t| National and Regional Standardization g| 27 -- g| 2.2.3 t| Trade and Special Interest Groups g| 29 -- g| 2.2.4 t| GSM Association g| 30 -- g| 2.2.5 t| GSM Alliance g| 30 -- g| 2.2.6 t| Standardization for Mobile Packet Data Environment g| 31 -- g| 2.2.7 t| Mobile Wireless Internet Forum g| 32 -- g| 2.2.8 t| Joint Initiative toward Mobile Multimedia g| 32 -- g| 2.2.9 t| Wireless Data Development Groups g| 32 -- g| 2.3 t| Overview of the Standards Creation Process g| 33 -- g| 2.3.1 t| Structure and Organization g| 33 -- g| 2.3.2 t| TIA Committee TR45 g| 34 -- g| 2.3.3 t| SMG g| 35 -- g| 2.3.4 t| Three Stage Specification Process g| 35 -- g| 2.3.5 t| Standards Acceptance Process g| 36 -- g| 2.4 t| Radio Technology Standards g| 36 -- g| 2.4.1 t| NMT g| 37 -- g| 2.4.2 t| TACS g| 37 -- g| 2.4.3 t| AMPS g| 38 -- g| 2.4.4 t| D-AMPS g| 38 -- g| 2.4.5 t| CDMA g| 38 -- g| 2.4.6 t| GSM g| 38 -- g| 2.4.7 t| PDC g| 39 -- g| 2.4.8 t| ESMR g| 39 -- g| 2.4.9 t| Satellite Technologies g| 39 -- g| 2.5 t| Mobile Network Standards g| 40 -- g| 2.5.1 t| ANSI-41 g| 41 -- g| 2.5.2 t| GSM MAP g| 41 -- g| 2.5.3 t| ANSI-41 versus GSM MAP g| 41 -- g| 2.6 t| Wireless Intelligent Networking Standards g| 43 -- g| 2.6.1 t| WIN g| 44 -- g| 2.6.2 t| CAMEL g| 44 -- g| 2.7 t| Evolution to Third-Generation Wireless Standards g| 44 -- g| 2.7.1 t| HSCSD g| 46 -- g| 2.7.2 t| GPRS g| 46 -- g| 2.7.3 t| EDGE g| 46 -- g| 2.7.4 t| W-CDMA g| 46 -- g| 2.7.5 t| Summary of Third-Generation Wireless Standards g| 47 -- g| 3 t| Wireless Signaling and Intelligent Networking g| 49 -- g| 3.1 t| Overview of SS7 Network Signaling g| 50 -- g| 3.1.1 t| What Is Signaling? g| 50 -- g| 3.1.2 t| Common Channel Signaling g| 51 -- g| 3.1.3 t| Signaling Services g| 52 -- g| 3.2 t| Physical SS7 Network g| 54 -- g| 3.2.1 t| Service Switching Points g| 55 -- g| 3.2.2 t| Signal Control Point g| 56 -- g| 3.2.3 t| Signal Transfer Point g| 56 -- g| 3.2.4 t| Signaling Links g| 57 -- g| 3.2.5 t| SS7 Network Deployments g| 60 -- g| 3.3 t| SS7 Protocols g| 61 -- g| 3.3.1 t| OSI Reference Model g| 61 -- g| 3.3.2 t| Message Transfer Part g| 63 -- g| 3.3.3 t| SCCP g| 67 -- g| 3.3.4 t| Upper Layers g| 70 -- g| 3.4 t| Signaling in a Wireless Network g| 75 -- g| 3.4.1 t| Wireless Network Elements g| 76 -- g| 3.4.2 t| Wireless Network Reference Models g| 78 -- g| 3.4.3 t| MAP g| 79 -- g| 3.4.4 t| Mobility Management g| 80 -- g| 3.5 t| Intelligent Networking g| 88 -- g| 3.5.1 t| Call Control g| 88 -- g| 3.5.2 t| Service-Independent Architecture g| 88 -- g| 3.5.3 t| Service Creation g| 89 -- g| 3.5.4 t| IN Modeling g| 89 -- g| Part 2 t| Evolution of Wireless Intelligent Networking Technology -- g| 4 t| Evolution of Wireless Intelligent Networking g| 93 -- g| 4.1 t| Origins of Intelligent Networking g| 93 -- g| 4.1.1 t| Automatic Switching g| 94 -- g| 4.1.2 t| Stored Program Control g| 95 -- g| 4.1.3 t| Common Channel Signaling g| 95 -- g| 4.1.4 t| Intelligent Network g| 97 -- g| 4.1.5 t| Advanced Intelligent Network g| 98 -- g| 4.2 t| Wireless Intelligent Networking g| 98 -- g| 4.2.1 t| Wireless Intelligent Networking versus WIN g| 99 -- g| 4.2.2 t| WIN g| 100 -- g| 4.2.3 t| CAMEL g| 104 -- g| 4.3 t| Relationship of Wireless Intelligent Networking Standards g| 105 -- g| 4.4 t| Migration from Point3 Solutions to Network-Based Solutions g| 105 -- g| 4.4.1 t| Impetus for Migration g| 106 -- g| 4.4.2 t| Advantages of Network-Based Solutions g| 106 -- g| 4.4.3 t| Operational Challenges of Network-Based Solutions g| 107 -- g| 5 t| Wireless Intelligent Networking Capabilities g| 109 -- g| 5.1 t| Intelligence in Telecommunications Networks g| 109 -- g| 5.1.1 t| Fixed Network Intelligence g| 110 -- g| 5.1.2 t| Mobile Network Intelligence g| 110 -- g| 5.1.3 t| Drivers for Improved Mobile Network Intelligence g| 110 -- g| 5.2 t| Standardized Intelligence for Mobile Networks: WIN and CAMEL g| 111 -- g| 5.2.1 t| Enabling Architecture and Standardized Capabilities g| 111 -- g| 5.2.2 t| Phased Development of Standards g| 111 -- g| 5.3 t| Wireless Intelligent Network g| 112 -- g| 5.3.1 t| Pre-WIN g| 113 -- g| 5.3.2 t| WIN Phase I g| 113 -- g| 5.3.3 t| WIN Phase II g| 122 -- g| 5.3.4 t| WIN Phase III g| 126 -- g| 5.3.5 t| Service and Feature Support Between Incompatible Networks g| 128 -- g| 5.3.6 t| Summary of WIN g| 130 -- g| 5.4 t| Customized Applications for Mobile Enhanced Logic g| 131 -- g| 5.4.1 t| CAMEL Phase I g| 132 -- g| 5.4.2 t| CAMEL Phase II g| 133 -- g| 5.4.3 t| CAMEL Trigger Detection Points g| 133 -- g| 5.4.4 t| Service and Feature Support Between Incompatible Networks g| 133 -- g| 5.4.5 t| Summary of CAMEL g| 136 -- g| 5.5 t| WIN and CAMEL Implementation Issues g| 137 -- g| 5.6 t| WIN and CAMEL Operational Issues g| 138 -- g| Part 3 t| Mobile Communications Business Issues -- g| 6 t| Mobile Market Environment and Trends g| 143 -- g| 6.1 t| Competition g| 143 -- g| 6.1.1 t| More Carriers = Greater Choice for Consumers g| 143 -- g| 6.1.2 t| Downward Price Pressure = Lower Revenue per Unit g| 144 -- g| 6.1.3 t| Consolidation and Alliances g| 146 -- g| 6.1.4 t| Need for Differentiation g| 147 -- g| 6.1.5 t| Who Owns the Customer Anyway? g| 147 -- g| 6.2 t| Technological Advancement g| 148 -- g| 6.2.1 t| Radio g| 148 -- g| 6.2.2 t| Switching g| 154 -- g| 6.2.3 t| Networking g| 155 -- g| 6.2.4 t| Network Intelligence g| 158 -- g| 6.3 t| Consumer Behavior and Enterprise Needs g| 158 -- g| 6.3.1 t| Personal Communications g| 159 -- g| 6.3.2 t| Need for Mobility g| 159 -- g| 6.3.3 t| Greater Usage and Dependence g| 160 -- g| 6.3.4 t| Calling Patterns g| 160 -- g| 6.3.5 t| Wireless/Wireline Integration g| 162 -- g| 6.3.6 t| Increased Desire for Control g| 162 -- g| 6.3.7 t| Access and Control of Information, Content, and Transactions g| 163 -- g| 6.3.8 t| Electronic Commerce g| 165 -- g| 6.3.9 t| Enhanced and Value-Added Services g| 166 -- g| 6.3.10 t| Expectations of Greater Value g| 166 -- g| 6.4 t| Regulation g| 167 -- g| 6.4.1 t| Regulatory Bodies g| 167 -- g| 6.4.2 t| Regulatory Developments g| 167 -- g| 6.4.3 t| Effect on Wireless Intelligent Networking g| 168 -- g| 7 t| Creating Market and Product/Service Value g| 171 -- g| 7.1 t| Value-Added Products and Services g| 171 -- g| 7.2 t| Basic Issues g| 172 -- g| 7.2.1 t| Market Needs and Readiness g| 173 -- g| 7.2.2 t| Development Capability g| 173 -- g| 7.2.3 t| Realization of Return on Investment Needs g| 173 -- g| 7.2.4 t| Product/Service Economic Analysis g| 174 -- g| 7.2.5 t| Product Development Process g| 177 -- g| 7.2.6 t| Product Development Process Example g| 180 -- g| 7.3 t| Technology Availability g| 180 -- g| 7.3.1 t| Standards g| 182 -- g| 7.3.2 t| Application Development g| 183 -- g| 7.3.3 t| Network Element Readiness g| 183 -- g| 7.3.4 t| Spectrum Availability g| 185 -- g| 7.4 t| Strategy Formulation g| 185 -- g| 7.4.1 t| Focus in a Defined Area g| 185 -- g| 7.4.2 t| Market Strategy g| 186 -- g| 7.4.3 t| Promote Value and Loyalty through Effective Business Processes g| 187 -- g| 7.4.4 t| Gain and Retain Market Share g| 188 -- g| 7.4.5 t| Leverage Emerging Capabilities for Many Services/Features g| 188 -- g| 7.5 t| Pre-WIN/CAMEL Alternatives g| 189 -- g| 7.5.1 t| Proprietary Solutions Based on TCAP Signaling g| 189 -- g| 7.5.2 t| ISUP-Based Call Control Solutions g| 190 -- g| 7.6 t| In-House Versus Outsource g| 191 -- g| 7.6.1 t| Vendor Solutions g| 192 -- g| 7.6.2 t| Application Development g| 192 -- g| 7.6.3 t| Wholesale Service Alternatives g| 192 -- g| Part 4 t| Leveraging Intelligence for Improved Network Capabilities and Advanced Services -- g| 8 t| Evolution of Wireless IN Services: From Emulation to Differentiation g| 199 -- g| 8.1 t| Intelligent Network Solutions to Wireless Fraud g| 200 -- g| 8.1.1 t| Pre-Call Validation g| 201 -- g| 8.1.2 t| Cloningn Fraud g| 201 -- g| 8.1.3 t| Detection via ANSI-41 Messaging g| 201 -- g| 8.1.4 t| Roamer Verification and Reinstatement (RVR) g| 202 -- g| 8.1.5 t| Authentication g| 203 -- g| 8.2 t| Network-Based HLR g| 206 -- g| 8.2.1 t| Initial Rationale and Benefit of Deployment g| 207 -- g| 8.2.2 t| Deployment Issues: Feature Availability g| 208 -- g| 8.2.3 t| Deployment Issues: Operational Concerns g| 208 -- g| 8.2.4 t| Long-Term Strategic Advantages g| 209 -- g| 8.3 t| Wireless Adds Wireline Services g| 209 -- g| 8.3.1 t| Emulation of Basic Wireline Features, IS-53 Standardizes Look and Feel g| 210 -- g| 8.3.2 t| Emulation of Wireline IN Services g| 211 -- g| 8.3.3 t| Integration of Wireline + Wireless Services ("Fixed/Mobile Convergence") g| 229 -- g| 8.4 t| Wireless-Specific Services Emerge g| 251 -- g| 8.4.1 t| Messaging g| 251 -- g| 8.4.2 t| Location Technology and Services g| 255 -- g| 8.5 t| Wireless Data g| 269 -- g| 8.5.1 t| Emergence of Data Prominence g| 269 -- g| 8.5.2 t| WIN Must Evolve to Encompass Internet-Based Services g| 270 -- g| 8.5.3 t| A New View of Network Intelligence (SCPs and Web Servers) g| 270 -- g| 8.5.4 t| Access to Web Information = Unlimited Applications g| 271 -- g| 8.5.5 t| Information Acess (Circuit- and Packet-Switched Access) g| 273 -- g| 8.5.6 t| Third-Generation (3G) Wireless Technology g| 274 -- g| 8.5.7 t| Electronic Commerce g| 275 -- g| 9 t| Evolution of WIN Architecture: Embracing the Internet and Data Services g| 279 -- g| 9.1 t| Trends for Next-Generation Networks: Convergent IN + IP Technologies g| 281 -- g| 9.1.1 t| Industry Trends g| 281 -- g| 9.1.2 t| Networking Requirements for a Converging Voice/Data Network g| 282 -- g| 9.2 t| Hybrid IN + IP Networks g| 284 -- g| 9.2.1 t| Convergence of IN (SS7) and IP Signaling g| 285 -- g| 9.2.2 t| PINT: IP Subscriber Services Adding IN Telephony Services (IP [left arrow] IN), Yielding a hybrid IP + IN Service g| 292 -- g| 9.2.3 t| SPIRITS: IN Subscriber Services Adding IP Services (IN [left arrow] IP), Yielding a Hybrid IN + IP Service g| 293 --
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    g| 9.2.4 t| IP Telephony: IP Subscribers Inherit IN Telephony Services (IP [left arrow] IN), Yielding an IP-Based Telephony Service g| 297 -- g| 9.2.5 t| IN Access to IP-Based Service Logic--WAP Services as an Alternative to WIN g| 305 -- g| 9.3 t| Open Service Creation g| 308 -- g| 9.3.1 t| Promise of Competitive Applications Market g| 308 -- g| Appendix A t| Intelligent Networking Architecture and Design Concepts g| 313 -- g| Appendix B t| Mobile Communications and Internet Organizations g| 335.
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Brown Science and Engineering Stacks N/A Available