Item Details

Involuntary Resettlement: Comparative Perspectives

Robert Picciotto, Warren van Wicklin, and Edward Rice, editors
Format
Book
Published
New Brunswick, N.J., U.S.A. : Transaction Publishers, c2001.
Language
English
Series
World Bank Series on Evaluation and Development
ISBN
0765800187 (cloth : alk. paper), 0765806835 (pbk. : alk. paper)
Contents
  • Most Projects Selected for the Study Have Greater Resettlement Problems than Typical Bank-Assisted Projects with Dams 2
  • Project Compensation Rates and Schedules Vary but Are Improving in Terms of Fairness and Timeliness 6
  • Relocation Record Is Uneven but Mostly Satisfactory 8
  • Income Restoration Record Is Unsatisfactory 9
  • Social Infrastructure and Services Are the Most Successful Components of Projects 12
  • Resettler Satisfaction Varies among Projects 13
  • Country Commitment and Performance Are Varied but Improving 14
  • Resettler Participation Is Common at All Stages of Projects 16
  • Nongovernmental Organization Participation Is Far from Optimal 17
  • Good Relations between Resettlers and Host Communities 18
  • Costs Vary Among Projects 19
  • Main Lessons Learned Focus on the Difference between Results and Plans, the Limited Capacity of Public Agencies, Resettlement Compensation, and Borrower Commitment 19
  • 2 Confrontations and Crises in Upper Krishna 23
  • Government Commitment Is Critical 24
  • Dams Flood 880 Square Kilometers, with 240,000 People Affected 26
  • Implementation of Resettlement--an Abysmal Record 28
  • Compensation--Too Little, Too Late, and Too Contentious 30
  • Government Continually Modifies Compensation Policy 30
  • Compensation Is Inadequate 31
  • Uses of Compensation Vary 32
  • Income Restoration Depends Too Much on Irrigation 32
  • Income Impact Trends Are Similar to Those in Unaffected Areas 33
  • Living Conditions Are Better but Health Is a Worrisome Exception 34
  • Move Hurts Women More Than Men 34
  • Resettler Attitudes Show Memory of Years of Hardship Are Not Erased by Recent Improvements 35
  • Federal Government Shows No Commitment 35
  • Ignored by the Authorities, Villagers Resorted to Courts 37
  • Nongovernment Organization Assistance Is Local and Limited 37
  • Host Communities Are Sympathetic 37
  • 3 Commitment to Income Recovery in China 41
  • Relocating 20,000 Families Successfully in a Challenging Rural Area 42
  • Flooding the Narrow Valley Meant New Settlements and New Occupations for Most Displacees 43
  • Implementing Resettlement Requires Flexibility 46
  • Compensation at Shuikou Is a Combination of Cash and Economic Infrastructure 49
  • Income Restoration Brings Higher Incomes, Better Living Conditions, and Resettler Satisfaction 50
  • Government Performance Shows Commitment, Flexibility, and a Vision of Development 51
  • Local Government and Villagers Participate in Making Decisions about Villagers' Futures 51
  • A Good National Policy on Involuntary Resettlement Continues to Improve 52
  • In Yantan, the Same Principles Are Applied under Harsher Conditions 53
  • 4 Responsiveness at High Cost in Thailand 59
  • Amidst Controversy, Electric Authority Applies a High-Cost Solution to Negotiating Compensation 60
  • Run-of-the-River Dam Construction Results in Minimal Land Loss and Relocation 60
  • Compensation Is a Moving Target in Implementing Resettlement 62
  • Actual Costs Considerably Exceed Planned Costs 64
  • Compensation Is Generally Generous, but Receives Mixed Responses 64
  • With Income Restoration, Incomes Are Maintained and the Quality of Life Is Improved 65
  • Resettlers Complain Despite Improvements 68
  • Electricity Generating Authority of Thailand Could Afford Excellent Resettlement Performance 69
  • Resettlers Provide Major Inputs, but Not Soon Enough 69
  • Settler Dissatisfaction Feeds Nongovernmental Organization Agenda 70
  • 5 Poor Planning and Settler Resistance in Indonesia 73
  • With Dense Population, Displacees Should Want to Transmigrate 75
  • Land Compensation Is Too Low for Rising Land Prices and Is Not Negotiable 86
  • Income Restoration Brings Higher Incomes for Many, but a Third Remain in Poverty 86
  • Settlers Are Satisfied with Situations and Services 88
  • Government Shows Low Commitment and Uncertain Capacity 89
  • Directg Resettler Participation Is Virtually Absent 90
  • Nongovernment Organizations Step In 90
  • Tensions Among Resettlers and Host Communities Is Low 90
  • Resettler and Nongovernment Organization Protests Change Policy 91
  • 6 Good Intentions, Costly Mistakes in Brazil 97
  • Short-Sightedness Leads to Increased Costs 98
  • Resettlement Requires Change from Floodplain Agriculture to Farming Land with Dry, Sandy Soils 99
  • Implementation of Resettlement Shows Poor Planning, with Delays Feeding Cost Escalation 100
  • Compensation Gives All Displacees Land and Promises of Irrigation, but Land Titles Are Delayed 102
  • Lacking Means for Earning Income, Most Displacees Rely on Monthly Maintenance for Income Restoration 104
  • Resettlers Fear the Future but Want to Move 108
  • Government Shows Commitment 109
  • Polo's Power as the Representative of Displacees Leads to Problems 110
  • Other Nongovernmental Organizations Show Only Sporadic Interest 111
  • 7 Resettlement without Rehabilitation in Togo 117
  • A Clear Definition of Income Restoration Is Needed 118
  • Ten Thousand People Are Displaced from a Wide Valley 118
  • Initial Success of Resettlement Implementation Is Erased by Unforeseen Hardships 119
  • Increases of Actual Cost over Projected Costs Is Minimal 121
  • Compensation Is Inappropriate and Misunderstood 121
  • With Inadequate Support for Crop Intensification, Resettlers Lose Income 123
  • Project Changes in Social Services and Infrastructure Have Mixed Results 124
  • Resettlers Are Disappointed and Distrustful 125
  • Country Commitment Is Good on the Short-Term Inputs but Lack a Long-Term Perspective 126
  • Participation During Planning is Good, but Tensions Build during Implementation 127
  • Capacity and Commitment Are Both Essential 131
  • Devil Is in the Details 133
  • Relocation Should Be Treated as a Development Opportunity 137.
Description
xiv, 146 p. : maps ; 26 cm.
Notes
Includes bibliographical references and index.
Series Statement
World Bank series on evaluation and development ; v. 2
Technical Details
  • Access in Virgo Classic

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    a| Involuntary resettlement : b| comparative perspectives / c| Robert Picciotto, Warren van Wicklin, and Edward Rice, editors.
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    t| Most Projects Selected for the Study Have Greater Resettlement Problems than Typical Bank-Assisted Projects with Dams g| 2 -- t| Project Compensation Rates and Schedules Vary but Are Improving in Terms of Fairness and Timeliness g| 6 -- t| Relocation Record Is Uneven but Mostly Satisfactory g| 8 -- t| Income Restoration Record Is Unsatisfactory g| 9 -- t| Social Infrastructure and Services Are the Most Successful Components of Projects g| 12 -- t| Resettler Satisfaction Varies among Projects g| 13 -- t| Country Commitment and Performance Are Varied but Improving g| 14 -- t| Resettler Participation Is Common at All Stages of Projects g| 16 -- t| Nongovernmental Organization Participation Is Far from Optimal g| 17 -- t| Good Relations between Resettlers and Host Communities g| 18 -- t| Costs Vary Among Projects g| 19 -- t| Main Lessons Learned Focus on the Difference between Results and Plans, the Limited Capacity of Public Agencies, Resettlement Compensation, and Borrower Commitment g| 19 -- g| 2 t| Confrontations and Crises in Upper Krishna g| 23 -- t| Government Commitment Is Critical g| 24 -- t| Dams Flood 880 Square Kilometers, with 240,000 People Affected g| 26 -- t| Implementation of Resettlement--an Abysmal Record g| 28 -- t| Compensation--Too Little, Too Late, and Too Contentious g| 30 -- t| Government Continually Modifies Compensation Policy g| 30 -- t| Compensation Is Inadequate g| 31 -- t| Uses of Compensation Vary g| 32 -- t| Income Restoration Depends Too Much on Irrigation g| 32 -- t| Income Impact Trends Are Similar to Those in Unaffected Areas g| 33 -- t| Living Conditions Are Better but Health Is a Worrisome Exception g| 34 -- t| Move Hurts Women More Than Men g| 34 -- t| Resettler Attitudes Show Memory of Years of Hardship Are Not Erased by Recent Improvements g| 35 -- t| Federal Government Shows No Commitment g| 35 -- t| Ignored by the Authorities, Villagers Resorted to Courts g| 37 -- t| Nongovernment Organization Assistance Is Local and Limited g| 37 -- t| Host Communities Are Sympathetic g| 37 -- g| 3 t| Commitment to Income Recovery in China g| 41 -- t| Relocating 20,000 Families Successfully in a Challenging Rural Area g| 42 -- t| Flooding the Narrow Valley Meant New Settlements and New Occupations for Most Displacees g| 43 -- t| Implementing Resettlement Requires Flexibility g| 46 -- t| Compensation at Shuikou Is a Combination of Cash and Economic Infrastructure g| 49 -- t| Income Restoration Brings Higher Incomes, Better Living Conditions, and Resettler Satisfaction g| 50 -- t| Government Performance Shows Commitment, Flexibility, and a Vision of Development g| 51 -- t| Local Government and Villagers Participate in Making Decisions about Villagers' Futures g| 51 -- t| A Good National Policy on Involuntary Resettlement Continues to Improve g| 52 -- t| In Yantan, the Same Principles Are Applied under Harsher Conditions g| 53 -- g| 4 t| Responsiveness at High Cost in Thailand g| 59 -- t| Amidst Controversy, Electric Authority Applies a High-Cost Solution to Negotiating Compensation g| 60 -- t| Run-of-the-River Dam Construction Results in Minimal Land Loss and Relocation g| 60 -- t| Compensation Is a Moving Target in Implementing Resettlement g| 62 -- t| Actual Costs Considerably Exceed Planned Costs g| 64 -- t| Compensation Is Generally Generous, but Receives Mixed Responses g| 64 -- t| With Income Restoration, Incomes Are Maintained and the Quality of Life Is Improved g| 65 -- t| Resettlers Complain Despite Improvements g| 68 -- t| Electricity Generating Authority of Thailand Could Afford Excellent Resettlement Performance g| 69 -- t| Resettlers Provide Major Inputs, but Not Soon Enough g| 69 -- t| Settler Dissatisfaction Feeds Nongovernmental Organization Agenda g| 70 -- g| 5 t| Poor Planning and Settler Resistance in Indonesia g| 73 -- t| With Dense Population, Displacees Should Want to Transmigrate g| 75 -- t| Land Compensation Is Too Low for Rising Land Prices and Is Not Negotiable g| 86 -- t| Income Restoration Brings Higher Incomes for Many, but a Third Remain in Poverty g| 86 -- t| Settlers Are Satisfied with Situations and Services g| 88 -- t| Government Shows Low Commitment and Uncertain Capacity g| 89 -- t| Directg Resettler Participation Is Virtually Absent g| 90 -- t| Nongovernment Organizations Step In g| 90 -- t| Tensions Among Resettlers and Host Communities Is Low g| 90 -- t| Resettler and Nongovernment Organization Protests Change Policy g| 91 -- g| 6 t| Good Intentions, Costly Mistakes in Brazil g| 97 -- t| Short-Sightedness Leads to Increased Costs g| 98 -- t| Resettlement Requires Change from Floodplain Agriculture to Farming Land with Dry, Sandy Soils g| 99 -- t| Implementation of Resettlement Shows Poor Planning, with Delays Feeding Cost Escalation g| 100 -- t| Compensation Gives All Displacees Land and Promises of Irrigation, but Land Titles Are Delayed g| 102 -- t| Lacking Means for Earning Income, Most Displacees Rely on Monthly Maintenance for Income Restoration g| 104 -- t| Resettlers Fear the Future but Want to Move g| 108 -- t| Government Shows Commitment g| 109 -- t| Polo's Power as the Representative of Displacees Leads to Problems g| 110 -- t| Other Nongovernmental Organizations Show Only Sporadic Interest g| 111 -- g| 7 t| Resettlement without Rehabilitation in Togo g| 117 -- t| A Clear Definition of Income Restoration Is Needed g| 118 -- t| Ten Thousand People Are Displaced from a Wide Valley g| 118 -- t| Initial Success of Resettlement Implementation Is Erased by Unforeseen Hardships g| 119 -- t| Increases of Actual Cost over Projected Costs Is Minimal g| 121 -- t| Compensation Is Inappropriate and Misunderstood g| 121 -- t| With Inadequate Support for Crop Intensification, Resettlers Lose Income g| 123 -- t| Project Changes in Social Services and Infrastructure Have Mixed Results g| 124 -- t| Resettlers Are Disappointed and Distrustful g| 125 -- t| Country Commitment Is Good on the Short-Term Inputs but Lack a Long-Term Perspective g| 126 -- t| Participation During Planning is Good, but Tensions Build during Implementation g| 127 -- t| Capacity and Commitment Are Both Essential g| 131 -- t| Devil Is in the Details g| 133 -- t| Relocation Should Be Treated as a Development Opportunity g| 137.
    596
      
      
    a| 2
    650
      
    0
    a| Water resources development z| Developing countries v| Case studies.
    650
      
    0
    a| Land settlement z| Developing countries v| Case studies.
    650
      
    0
    a| Forced migration z| Developing countries v| Case studies.
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    a| Picciotto, Robert.
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    a| Wicklin, Warren van.
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    a| Rice, Edward.
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    a| HD1702 .I58 2001 w| LC i| X004473263 l| STACKS m| ALDERMAN t| BOOK

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