Item Details

Fundamentals of High-Performance Concrete

Edward G. Nawy
Format
Book
Published
New York : John Wiley, c2001.
Edition
2nd ed
Language
English
ISBN
0471385557 (cloth : alk. paper)
Contents
  • 1 General Performance Characteristics 1
  • 1.2 Cement effects on concrete strength 2
  • 1.3 Portland cement characteristics and content 3
  • 1.4 Other hydraulic cements 8
  • 1.5 Performance comparisons of various cements in concrete 10
  • 1.6 Water/cement, water/cementitious materials, and liquid/cement ratios in concretes 11
  • 1.7 Aggregates 14
  • 1.8 Types of chemical and mineral admixtures 18
  • 2 Permeability Effects on Performance of Concrete 27
  • 2.1 Air voids and permeability 27
  • 2.2 Permeability, diffusion, and sorptivity in concrete 28
  • 2.3 Freezing and thawing action 33
  • 2.4 Concreting in cold weather 36
  • 2.5 Air-entraining agents 38
  • 2.6 ACI recommendations on cold-weather concreting 40
  • 2.7 Freezing and thawing effects on hardened high-strength concrete 40
  • 2.8 Hot-weather concreting 42
  • 3 Mineral and Chemical Admixtures in High-Strength High-Performance Concrete 50
  • A Mineral Admixtures 50
  • 3.1 Fly ash 50
  • 3.2 Granulated graded blast furnace slag 58
  • 3.3 Silica fume 61
  • 3.4 High-reactivity metakaolin 66
  • B Chemical Admixtures 68
  • 3.5 Polymers 68
  • 3.6 High-range water-reducing admixtures 75
  • 3.7 Corrosion-inhibiting admixtures 80
  • 4 Design of Concrete Mixtures for High-Performance Normal- and High-Strength Concrete 89
  • 4.2 Strength requirements 90
  • 4.3 Selection of constituent materials 92
  • 4.4 Step-by-step procedure for selecting proportions 94
  • 4.5 Flowcharts for proportioning mixtures for normal- and high-strength high-performance concrete 95
  • 4.6 Mixture design for normal-strength concrete 97
  • 4.7 Recommended proportions for high-strength high-performance concrete 108
  • 5 High-Performance Lightweight Aggregate Concrete (Low-Density Aggregate Concrete) 123
  • 5.1 Aggregate production 123
  • 5.2 Aggregate properties 125
  • 5.3 Proportioning, mixing, and placement 127
  • 5.4 Creep and shrinkage of lightweight concrete (low-density aggregate concrete) 136
  • 5.5 Durability 137
  • 5.6 Thermal expansion and thermal conductivity 138
  • 5.7 Carbonation in low-density aggregate concrete (lightweight concrete) 141
  • 5.8 High-strength lightweight aggregate concrete in offshore arctic environments 142
  • 5.9 Design of concrete mixtures for structural lightweight aggregate concrete (low-density aggregate concrete) 143
  • 6 Long-Term Effects 159
  • 6.1 Creep in concrete 159
  • 6.2 Creep prediction 162
  • 6.3 Shrinkage in concrete 167
  • 6.4 Strength and elastic properties of concrete versus time 174
  • 6.5 Serviceability: long-term considerations 178
  • 7 Characteristics of High-Performance Concrete 204
  • 7.2 Concrete properties at early ages 206
  • 7.3 Mature elastic strength expressions 210
  • 7.4 Workability and cohesiveness 211
  • 7.5 Permeability 215
  • 7.6 Volumetric stability 219
  • 7.7 Ductility and energy absorption 232
  • 7.8 Constructibility 237
  • 7.9 Bond to parent concrete 239
  • 7.10 Abrasion resistance 240
  • 7.11 Fire resistance 241
  • 8 Micro- and Macromechanics of High-Performance Concrete 246
  • 8.1 Historical review 246
  • 8.2 Microscopic and macroscopic behavior 247
  • 8.3 Micro- and macromechanics theories 248
  • 8.4 Classical failure theories 248
  • 8.5 Crack propagation theory 249
  • 8.6 Fracture mechanics theory 252
  • 8.7 Shear friction transfer in two-layer high-strength concrete systems 267
  • 8.8 Confinement in high-strength concrete 277
  • 9 Fiber-Reinforced Concrete and Fiber-Reinforced Plastic Composites 290
  • A Fiber-Reinforced Concrete 290
  • 9.1 Historical development 290
  • 9.2 General characteristics 291
  • 9.3 Mixture proportioning 294
  • 9.4 Mechanics of fiber reinforcement 295
  • 9.5 Mechanical properties of fibrous concrete structural elements 299
  • 9.6 Steel fiber-reinforced cement composites 306
  • B Fiber-Reinforced Plastic Composites 310
  • 9.7 Historical development 310
  • 9.8 Beams and two-way slabs reinforced with GFRP bars 310
  • 9.9 Carbon fibers and composite reinforcement 311
  • 9.10 Fire resistance of polymer plastic composites 318
  • 9.11 Prestressed concrete prism elements as main composite reinforcement in concrete beams 320
  • 10 Economics of High-Strength High-Performance Concrete 325
  • 10.2 Principal factors affecting cost 326
  • 10.3 Advantages of using high-strength concrete 328
  • 10.4 Cost studies and comparisons 329
  • 10.5 High-strength concrete in prestressed concrete bridge girders 338
  • 11 Proportioning Concrete Structural Elements by ACI 318-99 Code: An Overview 344
  • 11.1 Structural concrete 344
  • 11.2 Structural design considerations 348
  • 11.3 Reinforced concrete members 354
  • 11.4 Prestressed concrete 366
  • 11.5 Shear and torsion in prestressed elements 369
  • 11.6 Walls and footings 371
  • 12 Performance Control for Long-Term Durability: A Summation 373
  • 12.2 Concrete constituent materials 375
  • 12.3 Corrosion inhibitors 379
  • 12.4 Mixing water 379
  • 12.5 Mixture proportioning for high performance 379
  • 12.6 Constructability process 382
  • 12.7 Serviceability considerations for long-term durability 386
  • 12.8 Quality control and quality assurance 392
  • 13 High-Performance Concrete in the 21st Century 407
  • 13.1 New millennium 407
  • 13.2 High-performance concrete construction needs 408
  • 13.3 Design and rehabilitation considerations 411
  • 13.4 Constructability considerations 413
  • 13.5 Monitoring and cost evaluation 414
  • 13.6 Expectations and conclusions 416
  • Table A.1 PI unit conversion to SI units: general 420
  • Table A.2 PI unit conversion to SI units: load and stress intensity 421
  • Table A.3 PI unit conversion to MKS metric units 421
  • Table A.4 Chemical analysis by XRF of cement, fly ash, and silica fume 421
  • Table A.5 Physical properties of some heavyweight aggregates 422
  • Table A.6 Density classification of concrete aggregates 422
  • Table A.7 Typical solid wastes as aggregates for concrete 423
  • Table A.8 High-strength high-rise buildings 424
  • Table A.9 Mixture proportions of recent high-rise buildings 425
  • Table A.10 Concrete platforms in the North Sea 426
  • Appendix B Standards and Reports 427.
Description
xviii, 441 p. : ill. ; 26 cm.
Notes
Includes bibliographical references and indexes.
Technical Details
  • Access in Virgo Classic

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    a| Fundamentals of high-performance concrete / c| Edward G. Nawy.
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    g| 1 t| General Performance Characteristics g| 1 -- g| 1.2 t| Cement effects on concrete strength g| 2 -- g| 1.3 t| Portland cement characteristics and content g| 3 -- g| 1.4 t| Other hydraulic cements g| 8 -- g| 1.5 t| Performance comparisons of various cements in concrete g| 10 -- g| 1.6 t| Water/cement, water/cementitious materials, and liquid/cement ratios in concretes g| 11 -- g| 1.7 t| Aggregates g| 14 -- g| 1.8 t| Types of chemical and mineral admixtures g| 18 -- g| 2 t| Permeability Effects on Performance of Concrete g| 27 -- g| 2.1 t| Air voids and permeability g| 27 -- g| 2.2 t| Permeability, diffusion, and sorptivity in concrete g| 28 -- g| 2.3 t| Freezing and thawing action g| 33 -- g| 2.4 t| Concreting in cold weather g| 36 -- g| 2.5 t| Air-entraining agents g| 38 -- g| 2.6 t| ACI recommendations on cold-weather concreting g| 40 -- g| 2.7 t| Freezing and thawing effects on hardened high-strength concrete g| 40 -- g| 2.8 t| Hot-weather concreting g| 42 -- g| 3 t| Mineral and Chemical Admixtures in High-Strength High-Performance Concrete g| 50 -- g| A t| Mineral Admixtures g| 50 -- g| 3.1 t| Fly ash g| 50 -- g| 3.2 t| Granulated graded blast furnace slag g| 58 -- g| 3.3 t| Silica fume g| 61 -- g| 3.4 t| High-reactivity metakaolin g| 66 -- g| B t| Chemical Admixtures g| 68 -- g| 3.5 t| Polymers g| 68 -- g| 3.6 t| High-range water-reducing admixtures g| 75 -- g| 3.7 t| Corrosion-inhibiting admixtures g| 80 -- g| 4 t| Design of Concrete Mixtures for High-Performance Normal- and High-Strength Concrete g| 89 -- g| 4.2 t| Strength requirements g| 90 -- g| 4.3 t| Selection of constituent materials g| 92 -- g| 4.4 t| Step-by-step procedure for selecting proportions g| 94 -- g| 4.5 t| Flowcharts for proportioning mixtures for normal- and high-strength high-performance concrete g| 95 -- g| 4.6 t| Mixture design for normal-strength concrete g| 97 -- g| 4.7 t| Recommended proportions for high-strength high-performance concrete g| 108 -- g| 5 t| High-Performance Lightweight Aggregate Concrete (Low-Density Aggregate Concrete) g| 123 -- g| 5.1 t| Aggregate production g| 123 -- g| 5.2 t| Aggregate properties g| 125 -- g| 5.3 t| Proportioning, mixing, and placement g| 127 -- g| 5.4 t| Creep and shrinkage of lightweight concrete (low-density aggregate concrete) g| 136 -- g| 5.5 t| Durability g| 137 -- g| 5.6 t| Thermal expansion and thermal conductivity g| 138 -- g| 5.7 t| Carbonation in low-density aggregate concrete (lightweight concrete) g| 141 -- g| 5.8 t| High-strength lightweight aggregate concrete in offshore arctic environments g| 142 -- g| 5.9 t| Design of concrete mixtures for structural lightweight aggregate concrete (low-density aggregate concrete) g| 143 -- g| 6 t| Long-Term Effects g| 159 -- g| 6.1 t| Creep in concrete g| 159 -- g| 6.2 t| Creep prediction g| 162 -- g| 6.3 t| Shrinkage in concrete g| 167 -- g| 6.4 t| Strength and elastic properties of concrete versus time g| 174 -- g| 6.5 t| Serviceability: long-term considerations g| 178 -- g| 7 t| Characteristics of High-Performance Concrete g| 204 -- g| 7.2 t| Concrete properties at early ages g| 206 -- g| 7.3 t| Mature elastic strength expressions g| 210 -- g| 7.4 t| Workability and cohesiveness g| 211 -- g| 7.5 t| Permeability g| 215 -- g| 7.6 t| Volumetric stability g| 219 -- g| 7.7 t| Ductility and energy absorption g| 232 -- g| 7.8 t| Constructibility g| 237 -- g| 7.9 t| Bond to parent concrete g| 239 -- g| 7.10 t| Abrasion resistance g| 240 -- g| 7.11 t| Fire resistance g| 241 -- g| 8 t| Micro- and Macromechanics of High-Performance Concrete g| 246 -- g| 8.1 t| Historical review g| 246 -- g| 8.2 t| Microscopic and macroscopic behavior g| 247 -- g| 8.3 t| Micro- and macromechanics theories g| 248 -- g| 8.4 t| Classical failure theories g| 248 -- g| 8.5 t| Crack propagation theory g| 249 -- g| 8.6 t| Fracture mechanics theory g| 252 -- g| 8.7 t| Shear friction transfer in two-layer high-strength concrete systems g| 267 -- g| 8.8 t| Confinement in high-strength concrete g| 277 -- g| 9 t| Fiber-Reinforced Concrete and Fiber-Reinforced Plastic Composites g| 290 -- g| A t| Fiber-Reinforced Concrete g| 290 -- g| 9.1 t| Historical development g| 290 -- g| 9.2 t| General characteristics g| 291 -- g| 9.3 t| Mixture proportioning g| 294 -- g| 9.4 t| Mechanics of fiber reinforcement g| 295 -- g| 9.5 t| Mechanical properties of fibrous concrete structural elements g| 299 -- g| 9.6 t| Steel fiber-reinforced cement composites g| 306 -- g| B t| Fiber-Reinforced Plastic Composites g| 310 -- g| 9.7 t| Historical development g| 310 -- g| 9.8 t| Beams and two-way slabs reinforced with GFRP bars g| 310 -- g| 9.9 t| Carbon fibers and composite reinforcement g| 311 -- g| 9.10 t| Fire resistance of polymer plastic composites g| 318 -- g| 9.11 t| Prestressed concrete prism elements as main composite reinforcement in concrete beams g| 320 -- g| 10 t| Economics of High-Strength High-Performance Concrete g| 325 -- g| 10.2 t| Principal factors affecting cost g| 326 -- g| 10.3 t| Advantages of using high-strength concrete g| 328 -- g| 10.4 t| Cost studies and comparisons g| 329 -- g| 10.5 t| High-strength concrete in prestressed concrete bridge girders g| 338 -- g| 11 t| Proportioning Concrete Structural Elements by ACI 318-99 Code: An Overview g| 344 -- g| 11.1 t| Structural concrete g| 344 -- g| 11.2 t| Structural design considerations g| 348 -- g| 11.3 t| Reinforced concrete members g| 354 -- g| 11.4 t| Prestressed concrete g| 366 -- g| 11.5 t| Shear and torsion in prestressed elements g| 369 -- g| 11.6 t| Walls and footings g| 371 -- g| 12 t| Performance Control for Long-Term Durability: A Summation g| 373 -- g| 12.2 t| Concrete constituent materials g| 375 -- g| 12.3 t| Corrosion inhibitors g| 379 -- g| 12.4 t| Mixing water g| 379 -- g| 12.5 t| Mixture proportioning for high performance g| 379 -- g| 12.6 t| Constructability process g| 382 -- g| 12.7 t| Serviceability considerations for long-term durability g| 386 -- g| 12.8 t| Quality control and quality assurance g| 392 -- g| 13 t| High-Performance Concrete in the 21st Century g| 407 -- g| 13.1 t| New millennium g| 407 -- g| 13.2 t| High-performance concrete construction needs g| 408 -- g| 13.3 t| Design and rehabilitation considerations g| 411 -- g| 13.4 t| Constructability considerations g| 413 -- g| 13.5 t| Monitoring and cost evaluation g| 414 -- g| 13.6 t| Expectations and conclusions g| 416 -- g| Table A.1 t| PI unit conversion to SI units: general g| 420 -- g| Table A.2 t| PI unit conversion to SI units: load and stress intensity g| 421 -- g| Table A.3 t| PI unit conversion to MKS metric units g| 421 -- g| Table A.4 t| Chemical analysis by XRF of cement, fly ash, and silica fume g| 421 -- g| Table A.5 t| Physical properties of some heavyweight aggregates g| 422 -- g| Table A.6 t| Density classification of concrete aggregates g| 422 -- g| Table A.7 t| Typical solid wastes as aggregates for concrete g| 423 -- g| Table A.8 t| High-strength high-rise buildings g| 424 -- g| Table A.9 t| Mixture proportions of recent high-rise buildings g| 425 -- g| Table A.10 t| Concrete platforms in the North Sea g| 426 -- g| Appendix B t| Standards and Reports g| 427.
    596
      
      
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    650
      
    0
    a| High strength concrete.
    999
      
      
    a| TA439 .N35 2001 w| LC i| X004420437 l| STACKS m| SCI-ENG t| BOOK

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