Item Details

Doing History: Investigating With Children in Elementary and Middle Schools

Linda S. Levstik, Keith C. Barton
Format
Book
Published
Mahwah, N.J. : Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, 2001.
Edition
2nd ed
Language
English
ISBN
0805835628 (pbk. : alk. paper)
Contents
  • Chapter 1 Past, Present, and Future: The Sociocultural Context for Studying History 1
  • History Helps Us Think About Who We Are 1
  • History Helps Us Picture Possible Futures 2
  • History Is About Significant Themes and Questions 3
  • History Is Interpretive 4
  • History Is Explained Through Narratives 5
  • History Is More than Politics 6
  • Chapter 2 It's Not Just a Mishap: The Theory Behind Disciplined Inquiry 9
  • Learning Means In-Depth Understanding 10
  • Instruction Must Build On Students' Prior Knowledge 11
  • People Learn Through Disciplined Inquiry 12
  • Teaching Means Scaffolding 14
  • Constructive Assessment 15
  • Chapter 3 There Aren't a Lot of "For Sure" Facts: Building Communities of Historical Inquiry 19
  • Talking Historically 21
  • Importance of Questions 23
  • Prior Knowledge 24
  • Imaginative Entry 25
  • Children's and Adolescent Literature 28
  • Chapter 4 To Find Out Things We Didn't Know About Ourselves: Personal Histories 31
  • Asking Historical Questions 32
  • Collecting Historical Information 32
  • Drawing Conclusions and Reflecting on Learning 33
  • Assessing Students' Learning 35
  • History of Me in the Context of Diversity 39
  • Children's and Adolescent Literature 41
  • Chapter 5 Tell Me About Yourself: Linking Children to the Past Through Family Histories 43
  • Connecting Students to Important Historical Themes 44
  • Imaginative Entry: Personalizing History 45
  • Collecting and Interpreting Information 46
  • Assessment and Feedback 47
  • Linking Students to Larger Narratives 50
  • Family History in the Context of Diversity 50
  • Children's and Adolescent Literature 54
  • Chapter 6 I Think Columbus Went to Hell!: Initiating Inquiry to World History 57
  • Start Locally, Connect Globally 58
  • Start Globally, Connect Locally 59
  • Scaffolding Inquiry Into Distant Times and Places 60
  • Persistence of Historical Myths 70
  • Assessing History Outcomes 71
  • Children's and Adolescent Literature 73
  • Chapter 7 Rats in the Hospital: Creating a History Museum 75
  • Imaginative Entry 76
  • Turning Research into Researchable Questions 77
  • Finding the Answers to Questions 79
  • Reaching Conclusions 81
  • Assessment and Self-regulated Learning 82
  • Developing an Understanding of Time and Chronology 84
  • Children's and Adolescent Literature 88
  • Chapter 8 I Have No Experience with This!: Historical Inquiry in an Integrated Social Studies Setting 91
  • All Questions Are Not Created Equal: Moving Beyond the Superficial 93
  • Flexibility Is Essential: Building on Student Discoveries 95
  • Maintaining Focus 97
  • Now, What Does it Mean? 98
  • Time for Reflection and Assessment 100
  • Children's and Adolescent Literature 102
  • Chapter 9 Why Isn't That in the Textbook?: Fiction, Nonfiction, and Historical Thinking 105
  • Selecting Good Narrative History 108
  • "I Did Not Panic": Creating Historical Narratives 113
  • Analyzing Student's Historical Narratives 116
  • Children's and Adolescent Literature 119
  • Chapter 10 Oh, Good! We Get to Argue: Putting Conflict in Context 121
  • It Is Happening Right Now: Starting with Current Events 123
  • What If? It Could Have Been Different 126
  • It Isn't Finished Yet: You Can Make a Difference 128
  • Assessing Conflict in Context 129
  • Children's and Adolescent Literature 131
  • Chapter 11 In My Opinion, it Could Happen Again: How Attitudes and Beliefs Have Changed over Time 133
  • Changes in Names 134
  • Changes in Social Relations 136
  • Salem Witch Trials 141
  • Long-term Assessment of Historical Skills 143
  • Children's and Adolescent Literature 146
  • Chapter 12 Nosotros La Gente: Diverse Perspectives in American History 149
  • People in American History 150
  • Using Literature and Primary Sources to Understand People 151
  • Diversity in American History 153
  • Building on What Students Know 156
  • Scaffolding Students' Understanding 158
  • Assessing Students' Knowledge of Historical Content 159
  • Children's and Adolescent Literature 165
  • Chapter 13 Arts Make Us All Part of Humankind: Cognitive Pluralism in History Teaching and Learning 167
  • Arts Address Significant Historical Questions 169
  • Arts as Source Material for Historical Study 170
  • Imagining in Your Mind: Learning to Read the Historic Arts 175
  • Arts as Vehicles for Expressing Historical Understanding 178
  • Arts as Problem Solving 179
  • Arts as Intellectual Risk Taking 180
  • Assessment and the Arts 182.
Description
xiii, 217 p. : ill. ; 28 cm.
Notes
Includes bibliographical references (p. 193-204) and index.
Technical Details
  • Access in Virgo Classic

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    a| 2nd ed.
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    a| Mahwah, N.J. : b| Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, c| 2001.
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    a| xiii, 217 p. : b| ill. ; c| 28 cm.
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    a| Includes bibliographical references (p. 193-204) and index.
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    g| Chapter 1 t| Past, Present, and Future: The Sociocultural Context for Studying History g| 1 -- t| History Helps Us Think About Who We Are g| 1 -- t| History Helps Us Picture Possible Futures g| 2 -- t| History Is About Significant Themes and Questions g| 3 -- t| History Is Interpretive g| 4 -- t| History Is Explained Through Narratives g| 5 -- t| History Is More than Politics g| 6 -- g| Chapter 2 t| It's Not Just a Mishap: The Theory Behind Disciplined Inquiry g| 9 -- t| Learning Means In-Depth Understanding g| 10 -- t| Instruction Must Build On Students' Prior Knowledge g| 11 -- t| People Learn Through Disciplined Inquiry g| 12 -- t| Teaching Means Scaffolding g| 14 -- t| Constructive Assessment g| 15 -- g| Chapter 3 t| There Aren't a Lot of "For Sure" Facts: Building Communities of Historical Inquiry g| 19 -- t| Talking Historically g| 21 -- t| Importance of Questions g| 23 -- t| Prior Knowledge g| 24 -- t| Imaginative Entry g| 25 -- t| Children's and Adolescent Literature g| 28 -- g| Chapter 4 t| To Find Out Things We Didn't Know About Ourselves: Personal Histories g| 31 -- t| Asking Historical Questions g| 32 -- t| Collecting Historical Information g| 32 -- t| Drawing Conclusions and Reflecting on Learning g| 33 -- t| Assessing Students' Learning g| 35 -- t| History of Me in the Context of Diversity g| 39 -- t| Children's and Adolescent Literature g| 41 -- g| Chapter 5 t| Tell Me About Yourself: Linking Children to the Past Through Family Histories g| 43 -- t| Connecting Students to Important Historical Themes g| 44 -- t| Imaginative Entry: Personalizing History g| 45 -- t| Collecting and Interpreting Information g| 46 -- t| Assessment and Feedback g| 47 -- t| Linking Students to Larger Narratives g| 50 -- t| Family History in the Context of Diversity g| 50 -- t| Children's and Adolescent Literature g| 54 -- g| Chapter 6 t| I Think Columbus Went to Hell!: Initiating Inquiry to World History g| 57 -- t| Start Locally, Connect Globally g| 58 -- t| Start Globally, Connect Locally g| 59 -- t| Scaffolding Inquiry Into Distant Times and Places g| 60 -- t| Persistence of Historical Myths g| 70 -- t| Assessing History Outcomes g| 71 -- t| Children's and Adolescent Literature g| 73 -- g| Chapter 7 t| Rats in the Hospital: Creating a History Museum g| 75 -- t| Imaginative Entry g| 76 -- t| Turning Research into Researchable Questions g| 77 -- t| Finding the Answers to Questions g| 79 -- t| Reaching Conclusions g| 81 -- t| Assessment and Self-regulated Learning g| 82 -- t| Developing an Understanding of Time and Chronology g| 84 -- t| Children's and Adolescent Literature g| 88 -- g| Chapter 8 t| I Have No Experience with This!: Historical Inquiry in an Integrated Social Studies Setting g| 91 -- t| All Questions Are Not Created Equal: Moving Beyond the Superficial g| 93 -- t| Flexibility Is Essential: Building on Student Discoveries g| 95 -- t| Maintaining Focus g| 97 -- t| Now, What Does it Mean? g| 98 -- t| Time for Reflection and Assessment g| 100 -- t| Children's and Adolescent Literature g| 102 -- g| Chapter 9 t| Why Isn't That in the Textbook?: Fiction, Nonfiction, and Historical Thinking g| 105 -- t| Selecting Good Narrative History g| 108 -- t| "I Did Not Panic": Creating Historical Narratives g| 113 -- t| Analyzing Student's Historical Narratives g| 116 -- t| Children's and Adolescent Literature g| 119 -- g| Chapter 10 t| Oh, Good! We Get to Argue: Putting Conflict in Context g| 121 -- t| It Is Happening Right Now: Starting with Current Events g| 123 -- t| What If? It Could Have Been Different g| 126 -- t| It Isn't Finished Yet: You Can Make a Difference g| 128 -- t| Assessing Conflict in Context g| 129 -- t| Children's and Adolescent Literature g| 131 -- g| Chapter 11 t| In My Opinion, it Could Happen Again: How Attitudes and Beliefs Have Changed over Time g| 133 -- t| Changes in Names g| 134 -- t| Changes in Social Relations g| 136 -- t| Salem Witch Trials g| 141 -- t| Long-term Assessment of Historical Skills g| 143 -- t| Children's and Adolescent Literature g| 146 -- g| Chapter 12 t| Nosotros La Gente: Diverse Perspectives in American History g| 149 -- t| People in American History g| 150 -- t| Using Literature and Primary Sources to Understand People g| 151 -- t| Diversity in American History g| 153 -- t| Building on What Students Know g| 156 -- t| Scaffolding Students' Understanding g| 158 -- t| Assessing Students' Knowledge of Historical Content g| 159 -- t| Children's and Adolescent Literature g| 165 -- g| Chapter 13 t| Arts Make Us All Part of Humankind: Cognitive Pluralism in History Teaching and Learning g| 167 -- t| Arts Address Significant Historical Questions g| 169 -- t| Arts as Source Material for Historical Study g| 170 -- t| Imagining in Your Mind: Learning to Read the Historic Arts g| 175 -- t| Arts as Vehicles for Expressing Historical Understanding g| 178 -- t| Arts as Problem Solving g| 179 -- t| Arts as Intellectual Risk Taking g| 180 -- t| Assessment and the Arts g| 182.
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    a| History x| Study and teaching (Elementary) z| United States.
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    a| History x| Study and teaching (Middle school) z| United States.
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