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Java Developer's Guide to Servlets and JSP

Bill Brogden
Format
Book
Published
San Francisco, Calif. ; London : SYBEX, c2001.
Language
English
ISBN
0782128092
Contents
  • Chapter 1 Basic Servlet API 1
  • How a Web Server Handles HTTP Requests 2
  • Request Message Contents 3
  • Inner Workings of a Servlet Engine 8
  • Servlet API Packages 9
  • Javax.servlet Package 10
  • Javax.servlet.http Package 11
  • Implications of the Servlet Thread Model 12
  • Parts of a Basic Servlet 14
  • Init Method 14
  • Http Request Service Methods 16
  • Destroy Method 20
  • Setting Up a System for Servlet Development 21
  • Commercially Available Servlet Engines 21
  • Official Reference Implementation 22
  • Chapter 2 Basic JSP API 25
  • Role of JavaServer Pages 26
  • Sun's Web Application Vision 27
  • How JSP Is Related to Servlets 28
  • JSP and Components 29
  • JSP and Java Version History 29
  • Creating JSP Pages 31
  • Comments in JSP 32
  • Declarations and Member Variables 32
  • Code Fragments 34
  • Directives 35
  • XML Compatibility Style Tags 36
  • XML Equivalent of a JSP Page 38
  • JSP Packages 41
  • Javax.servlet.jsp Package 41
  • Javax.servlet.jsp.tagext Package 46
  • Design Considerations 46
  • Too Many Alternatives? 47
  • Design for Debugging 47
  • A Simple JSP Example 47
  • Input Form 48
  • One Approach to Presentation 49
  • JavaBean Approach 50
  • Table Building Bean 53
  • Future Developments 54
  • Chapter 3 Session Tracking 55
  • Example Application 56
  • Application Requirements 56
  • User Interface 57
  • Tracking with Hidden Form Variables 58
  • Chat Application Design 59
  • Tracking Hidden Variables with a Servlet 65
  • Tracking with Cookies 71
  • Cookie Standards in HTTP 71
  • Tracking with Session Objects 74
  • Methods in the HttpSession Interface 75
  • Session Listeners 76
  • Example of JSP Using Sessions 77
  • Do-It-Yourself Session Tracking 80
  • Scaling Up to Server Farms 81
  • Chapter 4 Generating Other Types of Content 83
  • HTML and Media Types 84
  • Sending Images 85
  • Creating Images 89
  • Creating Zip Files 95
  • Compression Classes 95
  • A Zip File Creating Servlet 96
  • A Sample File Zipping Application 98
  • Sound On-the-Fly 100
  • A Sound Demonstration Project 101
  • NumberSoundServ Servlet 102
  • Talking Applet 106
  • Playing Sounds with JavaScript 108
  • Vendor-Specific Formats 109
  • Chapter 5 Debugging 111
  • Anything That Can Go Wrong Will 112
  • Spying on Requests 114
  • UtilSnoop Application 114
  • How UtilSnoop Works 116
  • Web Server Errors 125
  • Log Files 126
  • Application Locations and Alias Settings 126
  • JSP Debugging Problems 129
  • JSP Syntax Errors 129
  • Design for Debugging 131
  • Tools for Beans 131
  • Catch That Exception! 132
  • Custom Exceptions 133
  • Using Assertions 133
  • Monitoring 135
  • Custom Logging 136
  • Miscellaneous Notes 137
  • Chapter 6 Servlets, JSP, and XML 139
  • Parts of XML 141
  • XML and DTD Examples 144
  • DOM and SAX Programming Models 146
  • Programming with the DOM 149
  • Parsing XML to Create a DOM 149
  • Java Objects in a DOM 150
  • Manipulating the DOM 151
  • Programming with SAX 152
  • Interfaces for Event Handlers 153
  • Interfaces for SAX Parsers 154
  • Classes for Parsers 155
  • XML Document for Errata 156
  • ErrataParserBean Class 158
  • Publications DTD 167
  • A DOM Library Function 168
  • BookDOMbean Class 172
  • Using BookDOMbean in a JSP Page 176
  • Alternatives to SAX and DOM 178
  • Java Document Object Model (JDOM) 178
  • Related Technology 178
  • Chapter 7 Using Enterprise JavaBeans 181
  • Web Application Server Architecture 182
  • Thinking about Containers 182
  • When Is It Appropriate to Use EJB? 184
  • Alternatives 185
  • Essential EJB Technology 186
  • Object Serialization 186
  • CORBA 187
  • RMI and RMI IIOP 187
  • JNDI 188
  • JMS 188
  • Deployment Descriptor 188
  • WAR and EJB-Jar Files 189
  • EJB with JSP and Servlets 190
  • Entity Beans 191
  • Session Beans 192
  • Outline of EJB Usage 192
  • Future of EJB 193
  • Chapter 8 Servlets, JSP, and JDBC Connections 195
  • Introduction to JDBC 196
  • Talking SQL to Databases 197
  • Four Types of JDBC Drivers 201
  • Finding a Database Engine 203
  • JDBC Database Creation 205
  • Getting a Connection 205
  • Using a Statement to Send Commands 206
  • Servlets with JDBC 211
  • Obtaining a Connection 212
  • Creating and Executing a Query 214
  • Working with the ResultSet 215
  • Chapter 9 Connecting to Custom Database Servers 217
  • Using Sockets in Java 218
  • Sockets and Streams 219
  • Socket Class Methods 221
  • Socket Communication Test Case 222
  • Revised Chat Servlet 226
  • Chat Server Program 233
  • Using Remote Method Invocation 242
  • Chat Server with RMI 243
  • Creating the Stubs 246
  • RMI on the Servlet Side 246
  • Chapter 10 Connecting to Legacy Programs 251
  • Java Runtime and Process APIs 252
  • Using the Runtime API 252
  • Using the Process API 253
  • Testing a Process Interface 254
  • Using a Process in a Servlet 270
  • ProcServlet with a Perl Script 273
  • ProcServlet with System Commands 275
  • Chapter 11 Custom Tag Libraries 277
  • Using Tag Libraries with JSP 278
  • Using Simple Custom Tags 279
  • Taglib Directive and the JSP Engine 279
  • A Simple Tag Example 280
  • Mem Tag Tag Handler Class 282
  • Using Tag Attributes 285
  • Defining Attributes in a Tag Library 286
  • Example Tags with Attributes 286
  • Attributes with Runtime Values 289
  • Interacting with a Body Element 293
  • A Simple BodyTag Example 293
  • Working with Body Content 298
  • Cooperating Tags 302
  • Tag Extension API 303
  • Tag Library Resources 303
  • Chapter 12 Applet-to-Servlet Communication 305
  • A Little Background 306
  • Bare Necessities 307
  • On to the Servlet! 309
  • Introducing Reusability 313
  • Status, Logs, and Debugging 318
  • Compression 325
  • Expanding Object Communication Concepts 326
  • On the Applet Side 328
  • Potential Applications 333
  • Appendix A Servlet and JSP APIs 335
  • Setting Parameters for Applications 336
  • Servlet Creation 337
  • HttpServlet Methods 338
  • ServletContext Interface 338
  • Getting Request Information 340
  • Methods Added by HttpServletRequest 340
  • Methods Related to Sessions and Cookies 342
  • Other Methods in ServletRequest 343
  • Setting Response Information 346
  • Methods Added by HttpServletResponse 348
  • JSP Output to Response 350
  • Errors and Exceptions 350
  • JSP Errors and Exceptions 351
  • HTTP Status and Error Codes 352
  • JavaServer Pages API 354
  • PageContext Class 356
  • Access to the Standard Variables 356
  • Jsp Writer Class 359
  • Javax.servlet.jsp.tagext Package 360
  • BodyContent Class 361.
Description
xix, 411 p. : ill. ; 23 cm. + 1 computer optical disc (4 3/4 in.)
Notes
Includes index.
Technical Details
  • Access in Virgo Classic
  • Staff View

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    a| Java developer's guide to servlets and JSP / c| Bill Brogden.
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    g| Chapter 1 t| Basic Servlet API g| 1 -- t| How a Web Server Handles HTTP Requests g| 2 -- t| Request Message Contents g| 3 -- t| Inner Workings of a Servlet Engine g| 8 -- t| Servlet API Packages g| 9 -- t| Javax.servlet Package g| 10 -- t| Javax.servlet.http Package g| 11 -- t| Implications of the Servlet Thread Model g| 12 -- t| Parts of a Basic Servlet g| 14 -- t| Init Method g| 14 -- t| Http Request Service Methods g| 16 -- t| Destroy Method g| 20 -- t| Setting Up a System for Servlet Development g| 21 -- t| Commercially Available Servlet Engines g| 21 -- t| Official Reference Implementation g| 22 -- g| Chapter 2 t| Basic JSP API g| 25 -- t| Role of JavaServer Pages g| 26 -- t| Sun's Web Application Vision g| 27 -- t| How JSP Is Related to Servlets g| 28 -- t| JSP and Components g| 29 -- t| JSP and Java Version History g| 29 -- t| Creating JSP Pages g| 31 -- t| Comments in JSP g| 32 -- t| Declarations and Member Variables g| 32 -- t| Code Fragments g| 34 -- t| Directives g| 35 -- t| XML Compatibility Style Tags g| 36 -- t| XML Equivalent of a JSP Page g| 38 -- t| JSP Packages g| 41 -- t| Javax.servlet.jsp Package g| 41 -- t| Javax.servlet.jsp.tagext Package g| 46 -- t| Design Considerations g| 46 -- t| Too Many Alternatives? g| 47 -- t| Design for Debugging g| 47 -- t| A Simple JSP Example g| 47 -- t| Input Form g| 48 -- t| One Approach to Presentation g| 49 -- t| JavaBean Approach g| 50 -- t| Table Building Bean g| 53 -- t| Future Developments g| 54 -- g| Chapter 3 t| Session Tracking g| 55 -- t| Example Application g| 56 -- t| Application Requirements g| 56 -- t| User Interface g| 57 -- t| Tracking with Hidden Form Variables g| 58 -- t| Chat Application Design g| 59 -- t| Tracking Hidden Variables with a Servlet g| 65 -- t| Tracking with Cookies g| 71 -- t| Cookie Standards in HTTP g| 71 -- t| Tracking with Session Objects g| 74 -- t| Methods in the HttpSession Interface g| 75 -- t| Session Listeners g| 76 -- t| Example of JSP Using Sessions g| 77 -- t| Do-It-Yourself Session Tracking g| 80 -- t| Scaling Up to Server Farms g| 81 -- g| Chapter 4 t| Generating Other Types of Content g| 83 -- t| HTML and Media Types g| 84 -- t| Sending Images g| 85 -- t| Creating Images g| 89 -- t| Creating Zip Files g| 95 -- t| Compression Classes g| 95 -- t| A Zip File Creating Servlet g| 96 -- t| A Sample File Zipping Application g| 98 -- t| Sound On-the-Fly g| 100 -- t| A Sound Demonstration Project g| 101 -- t| NumberSoundServ Servlet g| 102 -- t| Talking Applet g| 106 -- t| Playing Sounds with JavaScript g| 108 -- t| Vendor-Specific Formats g| 109 -- g| Chapter 5 t| Debugging g| 111 -- t| Anything That Can Go Wrong Will g| 112 -- t| Spying on Requests g| 114 -- t| UtilSnoop Application g| 114 -- t| How UtilSnoop Works g| 116 -- t| Web Server Errors g| 125 -- t| Log Files g| 126 -- t| Application Locations and Alias Settings g| 126 -- t| JSP Debugging Problems g| 129 -- t| JSP Syntax Errors g| 129 -- t| Design for Debugging g| 131 -- t| Tools for Beans g| 131 -- t| Catch That Exception! g| 132 -- t| Custom Exceptions g| 133 -- t| Using Assertions g| 133 -- t| Monitoring g| 135 -- t| Custom Logging g| 136 -- t| Miscellaneous Notes g| 137 -- g| Chapter 6 t| Servlets, JSP, and XML g| 139 -- t| Parts of XML g| 141 -- t| XML and DTD Examples g| 144 -- t| DOM and SAX Programming Models g| 146 -- t| Programming with the DOM g| 149 -- t| Parsing XML to Create a DOM g| 149 -- t| Java Objects in a DOM g| 150 -- t| Manipulating the DOM g| 151 -- t| Programming with SAX g| 152 -- t| Interfaces for Event Handlers g| 153 -- t| Interfaces for SAX Parsers g| 154 -- t| Classes for Parsers g| 155 -- t| XML Document for Errata g| 156 -- t| ErrataParserBean Class g| 158 -- t| Publications DTD g| 167 -- t| A DOM Library Function g| 168 -- t| BookDOMbean Class g| 172 -- t| Using BookDOMbean in a JSP Page g| 176 -- t| Alternatives to SAX and DOM g| 178 -- t| Java Document Object Model (JDOM) g| 178 -- t| Related Technology g| 178 -- g| Chapter 7 t| Using Enterprise JavaBeans g| 181 -- t| Web Application Server Architecture g| 182 -- t| Thinking about Containers g| 182 -- t| When Is It Appropriate to Use EJB? g| 184 -- t| Alternatives g| 185 -- t| Essential EJB Technology g| 186 -- t| Object Serialization g| 186 -- t| CORBA g| 187 -- t| RMI and RMI IIOP g| 187 -- t| JNDI g| 188 -- t| JMS g| 188 -- t| Deployment Descriptor g| 188 -- t| WAR and EJB-Jar Files g| 189 -- t| EJB with JSP and Servlets g| 190 -- t| Entity Beans g| 191 -- t| Session Beans g| 192 -- t| Outline of EJB Usage g| 192 -- t| Future of EJB g| 193 -- g| Chapter 8 t| Servlets, JSP, and JDBC Connections g| 195 -- t| Introduction to JDBC g| 196 -- t| Talking SQL to Databases g| 197 -- t| Four Types of JDBC Drivers g| 201 -- t| Finding a Database Engine g| 203 -- t| JDBC Database Creation g| 205 -- t| Getting a Connection g| 205 -- t| Using a Statement to Send Commands g| 206 -- t| Servlets with JDBC g| 211 -- t| Obtaining a Connection g| 212 -- t| Creating and Executing a Query g| 214 -- t| Working with the ResultSet g| 215 -- g| Chapter 9 t| Connecting to Custom Database Servers g| 217 -- t| Using Sockets in Java g| 218 -- t| Sockets and Streams g| 219 -- t| Socket Class Methods g| 221 -- t| Socket Communication Test Case g| 222 -- t| Revised Chat Servlet g| 226 -- t| Chat Server Program g| 233 -- t| Using Remote Method Invocation g| 242 -- t| Chat Server with RMI g| 243 -- t| Creating the Stubs g| 246 -- t| RMI on the Servlet Side g| 246 -- g| Chapter 10 t| Connecting to Legacy Programs g| 251 -- t| Java Runtime and Process APIs g| 252 -- t| Using the Runtime API g| 252 -- t| Using the Process API g| 253 -- t| Testing a Process Interface g| 254 -- t| Using a Process in a Servlet g| 270 -- t| ProcServlet with a Perl Script g| 273 -- t| ProcServlet with System Commands g| 275 -- g| Chapter 11 t| Custom Tag Libraries g| 277 -- t| Using Tag Libraries with JSP g| 278 -- t| Using Simple Custom Tags g| 279 -- t| Taglib Directive and the JSP Engine g| 279 -- t| A Simple Tag Example g| 280 -- t| Mem Tag Tag Handler Class g| 282 -- t| Using Tag Attributes g| 285 -- t| Defining Attributes in a Tag Library g| 286 -- t| Example Tags with Attributes g| 286 -- t| Attributes with Runtime Values g| 289 -- t| Interacting with a Body Element g| 293 -- t| A Simple BodyTag Example g| 293 -- t| Working with Body Content g| 298 -- t| Cooperating Tags g| 302 -- t| Tag Extension API g| 303 -- t| Tag Library Resources g| 303 -- g| Chapter 12 t| Applet-to-Servlet Communication g| 305 -- t| A Little Background g| 306 -- t| Bare Necessities g| 307 -- t| On to the Servlet! g| 309 -- t| Introducing Reusability g| 313 -- t| Status, Logs, and Debugging g| 318 -- t| Compression g| 325 -- t| Expanding Object Communication Concepts g| 326 -- t| On the Applet Side g| 328 -- t| Potential Applications g| 333 -- g| Appendix A t| Servlet and JSP APIs g| 335 -- t| Setting Parameters for Applications g| 336 -- t| Servlet Creation g| 337 -- t| HttpServlet Methods g| 338 -- t| ServletContext Interface g| 338 -- t| Getting Request Information g| 340 -- t| Methods Added by HttpServletRequest g| 340 -- t| Methods Related to Sessions and Cookies g| 342 -- t| Other Methods in ServletRequest g| 343 -- t| Setting Response Information g| 346 -- t| Methods Added by HttpServletResponse g| 348 -- t| JSP Output to Response g| 350 -- t| Errors and Exceptions g| 350 -- t| JSP Errors and Exceptions g| 351 -- t| HTTP Status and Error Codes g| 352 -- t| JavaServer Pages API g| 354 -- t| PageContext Class g| 356 -- t| Access to the Standard Variables g| 356 -- t| Jsp Writer Class g| 359 -- t| Javax.servlet.jsp.tagext Package g| 360 -- t| BodyContent Class g| 361.
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