Item Details

Desegregation of Charlottesville, Virginia Public Schools, 1954-1969: A Case Study

Crowe, Dallas R.
Format
Thesis/Dissertation; Online
Author
Crowe, Dallas R.
Advisor
Holmes, III, George W
Bash, James H
Seawell, W. H
Abstract
School desegregation became a matter of paramount concern for school boards, school administrators, and communities when the decision of the United States Supreme Court, in the case of Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka, was announced on May 17, 1954. The decision of the Supreme Court created special concern for most people in the states of the South. By law and custom segregation of the races was a way of life in the South. The decision of the Supreme Court, thus, was a threat to an established social order. Many white citizens were opposed to the change ordered by the Supreme Court. Others were reluctant to have such a change made because of social pressure from relatives, friends, neighbors, or business associates. This was the case in Virginia and in Charlottesville.
Language
English
Date Received
20160314
Published
University of Virginia, Curry School of Education, PHD (Doctor of Philosophy), 1971
Published Date
1971-01-01
Degree
PHD (Doctor of Philosophy)
Notes
Digitization of this thesis was made possible by a generous grant from the Jefferson Trust, 2015. Thesis originally deposited on 2016-03-14 in version 1.28 of Libra. This thesis was migrated to Libra2 on 2017-03-23 16:35:16.
Collection
Libra ETD Repository
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