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Individual Differences in Children'S Occupational Aspirations as a Function of Parental Traditionality

Fulcher, Megan
Format
Thesis/Dissertation; Online
Author
Fulcher, Megan
Advisor
Patterson, Charlotte
Schmidt, Karen
Gorman, Elizabeth
Weinfield, Nancy
Abstract
The current study was designed to test the application of the social-cognitive theory of gender development to prediction of the traditionality of children's occupational aspirations (Bussey & Bandura, 1999). The associations of the traditionality of children's occupational aspirations with children's visions of their future family roles and children's perceptions of the opportunity structure were also tested. 150 children and their mothers participated in the study. Mothers who reported nontraditional attitudes had children with nontraditional occupational aspirations. This association was mediated by children's feelings of efficacy for nontraditional tasks. Parents with nontraditional behaviors also had children with more nontraditional occupational aspirations, and this association was mediated by children's nontraditional perceptions of the opportunity structure. Many girls envisioned a future where childrearing was a primary responsibility and occupations were perceived as secondary and temporary. Boys envisioned a future where their primary responsibility to their future families was financial. The current study indicates some support for the social-cognitive theory of gender development (Bussey & Bandura, 1999). Note: Abstract extracted from PDF text
Language
English
Published
University of Virginia, Department of Psychology, PHD, 2004
Published Date
2004-08-01
Degree
PHD
Rights
All rights reserved (no additional license for public reuse)
Collection
Libra ETD Repository

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