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Fambul Tok

Caulker, John; Kanopy (Firm)
Format
Video; Streaming Video; Online
Summary
Seven years after the last bullet was fired, a decade of brutal fighting in Sierra Leone finds resolution as people come together to talk around traditional village bonfires. Some had perpetrated terrible crimes against friends or family. Some had faced horrible losses: loved ones murdered, limbs severed. But as they tell their stories, admit their wrongs, forgive, dance, and sing together, true reconciliation begins. This is the story of Fambul Tok (Krio for "family talk"), and it is a story the world needs to hear. In Fambul Tok, this story is told by the people who are living it. Our guide is human rights activist John Caulker, a Sierra Leonean with a vision of peace for his country. Village by village, Caulker organizes a grassroots program to help communities hold reconciliation ceremonies, and hold fast to the new peace. He finds his people eager to turn ancient customs towards healing contemporary wounds, and the result is stories viewers will never forget. Bonfire to bonfire, dark memories move into the light. Sahr and Nyumah, childhood friends torn apart when Nyumah was forced to cut Sahr's father's throat. Esther, raped as a child by a group of soldiers, among them her uncle Joseph, just 13 years old himself at the time. The radical forgiveness they request or offer is shocking - and inspiring. Their stories challenge Western perceptions of justice and provoke new ways of thinking about crime and punishment, conflict and community. Never is this more true than when Captain Mohamed Savage, the notorious rebel commander believed to have committed some of the worst atrocities in the war, is onscreen. A defiant, menacing voice in his first meetings with Caulker, we witness his transformation as he encounters Fambul Tok, admits who he is, and expresses his desire to return to the site of many of his alleged atrocities, to apologize. Fambul Tok raises questions about efforts to create peace in Africa through Western-based traditions of crime and punishment, challenging the neo-colonial idea that Africa needs to be "saved" by the West. By illuminating a successful peace process that is based on reviving communal traditions of confession, forgiveness, and restorative justice, the film encourages individuals and communities around the world to engage in the kind of grass-roots transformation that leads to peace. Film Festivals, Screenings, Awards: Honorable Mention, International Film Festival for Environment, Health and Culture, 2013 Best Documentary Feature, SENE Film, Music and Arts Festival, 2013 Best Human Spirit Documentary, Chagrin Documentary Film Festival, 2012 Golden Lobster: Best Documentary, Portland Maine Film Festival, 2012 St. Clair Bourne (Best Documentary) Award, San Francisco Black Film Festival, 2012 Norman Vaughan Indomitable Spirit Award, Mountainfilm, 2012 Jury Special Prize, Portugal Underground Film Festival, 2012 Jury Grand Prize, Non Violence International Film Festival, 2012 Best Documentary, Queens World Film Festival, 2012 Best Documentary, Reynolda Film Festival, 2012 Best Feature, Show Me Justice Film Festival, 2012 Crystal Heart Award, Heartland Film Festival, 2011 Human Spirit Award, Nashville Film Festival, 2011 Honorable Mention Best Documentary, Nashville Film Festival, 2011 Best Documentary, Ft. Myers Film Festival, 2011 Best of Fest, Global Social Change Film Festival, 2011 Best Documentary, Audience Choice Award, FLICKERS: Rhode Island International Film Festival, 2011 SIGNIS Award, Zanzibar International Film Festival, 2011 Filmmaker: Sara Terry.
Release Date
2012
Language
English
Notes
Title from title frames.
Published
[San Francisco, California, USA] : Kanopy Streaming, 2014.
Recording Info
Originally produced by Documentary Educational Resources in 2012.
Publisher no.
1097228 Kanopy
Related Resources
Cover Image
Description
1 online resource (1 video file, approximately 112 min.) : digital, .flv file, sound
Mode of access: World Wide Web.
Technical Details
  • Staff View

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    a| Seven years after the last bullet was fired, a decade of brutal fighting in Sierra Leone finds resolution as people come together to talk around traditional village bonfires. Some had perpetrated terrible crimes against friends or family. Some had faced horrible losses: loved ones murdered, limbs severed. But as they tell their stories, admit their wrongs, forgive, dance, and sing together, true reconciliation begins. This is the story of Fambul Tok (Krio for "family talk"), and it is a story the world needs to hear. In Fambul Tok, this story is told by the people who are living it. Our guide is human rights activist John Caulker, a Sierra Leonean with a vision of peace for his country. Village by village, Caulker organizes a grassroots program to help communities hold reconciliation ceremonies, and hold fast to the new peace. He finds his people eager to turn ancient customs towards healing contemporary wounds, and the result is stories viewers will never forget. Bonfire to bonfire, dark memories move into the light. Sahr and Nyumah, childhood friends torn apart when Nyumah was forced to cut Sahr's father's throat. Esther, raped as a child by a group of soldiers, among them her uncle Joseph, just 13 years old himself at the time. The radical forgiveness they request or offer is shocking - and inspiring. Their stories challenge Western perceptions of justice and provoke new ways of thinking about crime and punishment, conflict and community. Never is this more true than when Captain Mohamed Savage, the notorious rebel commander believed to have committed some of the worst atrocities in the war, is onscreen. A defiant, menacing voice in his first meetings with Caulker, we witness his transformation as he encounters Fambul Tok, admits who he is, and expresses his desire to return to the site of many of his alleged atrocities, to apologize. Fambul Tok raises questions about efforts to create peace in Africa through Western-based traditions of crime and punishment, challenging the neo-colonial idea that Africa needs to be "saved" by the West. By illuminating a successful peace process that is based on reviving communal traditions of confession, forgiveness, and restorative justice, the film encourages individuals and communities around the world to engage in the kind of grass-roots transformation that leads to peace. Film Festivals, Screenings, Awards: Honorable Mention, International Film Festival for Environment, Health and Culture, 2013 Best Documentary Feature, SENE Film, Music and Arts Festival, 2013 Best Human Spirit Documentary, Chagrin Documentary Film Festival, 2012 Golden Lobster: Best Documentary, Portland Maine Film Festival, 2012 St. Clair Bourne (Best Documentary) Award, San Francisco Black Film Festival, 2012 Norman Vaughan Indomitable Spirit Award, Mountainfilm, 2012 Jury Special Prize, Portugal Underground Film Festival, 2012 Jury Grand Prize, Non Violence International Film Festival, 2012 Best Documentary, Queens World Film Festival, 2012 Best Documentary, Reynolda Film Festival, 2012 Best Feature, Show Me Justice Film Festival, 2012 Crystal Heart Award, Heartland Film Festival, 2011 Human Spirit Award, Nashville Film Festival, 2011 Honorable Mention Best Documentary, Nashville Film Festival, 2011 Best Documentary, Ft. Myers Film Festival, 2011 Best of Fest, Global Social Change Film Festival, 2011 Best Documentary, Audience Choice Award, FLICKERS: Rhode Island International Film Festival, 2011 SIGNIS Award, Zanzibar International Film Festival, 2011 Filmmaker: Sara Terry.
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