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National Gallery Victoria and Bernardaud

Kanopy (Firm)
Format
Video; Streaming Video; Online
Summary
NATIONAL GALLERY VICTORIA Gerard Vaughan At Oxford University, where Vaughan researched a doctorate on neo-classical taste, he was offered a job in the vice-chancellor's office that turned into a
Release Date
2010
Language
In English
Notes
  • Title from title frames.
  • In Process Record.
Published
[San Francisco, California, USA] : Kanopy Streaming, 2015.
Recording Info
Originally produced by Exero Films in 2010.
Publisher no.
1084514 Kanopy
Related Resources
Cover Image
Description
1 online resource (streaming video file)
Mode of access: World Wide Web.
Technical Details
  • Staff View

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    a| NATIONAL GALLERY VICTORIA Gerard Vaughan At Oxford University, where Vaughan researched a doctorate on neo-classical taste, he was offered a job in the vice-chancellor's office that turned into a 1| billion fund-raising campaign. It led to a job running the British Museum's development trust for five years from 1994, then the NGV top job, which has included opening a second complex, the Ian Potter Centre, at Federation Square in 2002. Despite being responsible for a collection that is already huge, with more than 70,000 artworks, and worth about 3| .5 billion, Vaughan is eager to buy more. ''For the first 50 years [after the Alfred Felton bequest in 1904], we were one of the major acquiring institutions in the world,'' he says. But during the 1950s, the NGV's buying power declined as the bequest income stagnated under a conservative investment policy and prices shot up in the international art market. Now, with the support of private-sector philanthropy, Vaughan believes the NGV is again punching above its weight. ''We are regularly buying the kind of great masterpieces that were common in the early years of the Felton bequest.'' Indeed, one of his favourite quotes about the importance of money comes from the diary of Fenton, the wealthy Melbourne entrepreneur whose bequest has bought more than 15,000 of the NGV's works: ''Money? What's the point? Get it spent, do something useful.'' BERNARDAUD Michael Bernardaud The story of French porcelain begins in 1768 when a woman from the village of Saint-Yrieix La Perche near Limoges discovers a soft, white clay that she uses to bleach her household linens. Experts would identify this substance as kaolin: the crucial, long sought after ingredient that is responsible for the resiliency, durability and flawless iridescent translucency of fine porcelain. The search for this "secret ingredient" had lasted four centuries since Marco Polo's discovery of Chinese porcelain. The discovery of kaolin in France marked the birth of industrial and cultural significance of Limoges porcelain. Against this historical backdrop two enterprising industrialists, noticing an increase in consumer use of porcelain dinner services, open a factory in Limoges in 1863. The construction of railroad lines in the area offered means of distribution of their product to more markets. A workshop apprentice named Leonard Bernardaud distinguished himself among the workers. Twenty years later, he would be promoted to head of sales and later named partner. Leonard Bernardaud acquired the company in 1900 and gave it his name. He increased production capacity of the factory and opened up new markets, notably in the United States. Leonard was succeeded by his sons, Jacques and Michel Bernardaud. The brothers would assure the viability of the company during the turbulence of the Great Depression and World War II through collaborations with artists to expand the company's range of collections. In 1949, they boldly introduced the first gas-fueled tunnel kiln in France that operated 24 hours a day. This "green initiative" ensured constant firing temperatures that yielded sturdier pieces in greater quantity with fewer defects. As a result, industrial scale production was achieved without compromise to the high standards of craftsmanship based on artisan techniques for which the company is known.
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