Item Details

Estimate of the Housing Inventory From the Housing Vacancies and Homeownership Rates Database Shown in Houses [electronic resource]

Data-Planet by Conquest Systems
Format
Computer Resource; Online; Dataset
Published
Bethesda, MD Data-Planet by Conquest Systems 2018
Language
English
Summary
Reports a count of vacant and occupied housing units in the United States. A housing unit is vacant if no one is living in it at the time of the interview, unless its occupants are only temporarily absent. In addition, a vacant unit may be one that is entirely occupied by persons who have a usual residence elsewhere. New units not yet occupied are classified as vacant housing units if construction has reached a point where all exterior windows and doors are installed and final usable floors are in place. Vacant housing units are classified as year round or seasonal. Year-round units are those intended for occupancy at any time of the year, even though they may not be in use the year round. Year-round units include vacant units offered for rent and those offered both for rent and sale; vacant units for sale only, which excludes units both for rent and sale; vacant units rented or sold; vacant units held off the market, which includes units held for occasional use, temporarily occupied by persons with usual residence elsewhere, and vacant for other reasons (eg, held for occupancy of a caretaker, settlement of an estate, or personal reasons of the owner. Seasonal housing units are those intended for occupancy only during certain seasons of the year and are found primarily in resort areas. Housing units held for occupancy by migratory labor employed in farm work during the crop season are also tabulated as seasonal. A housing unit is considered occupied if a person or group of persons is living in it at the time of the interview or if the occupants are only temporarily absent, eg, on vacation. The persons living in the unit must consider it their usual place of residence or have no usual place of residence elsewhere. The count of occupied housing units is the same as the count of households. Occupied housing units are further distinguished as owner vs renter occupied. The Housing Vacancies and Homeownership dataset provides quarterly national- and regional-level information on rental and homeowner vacancy rates, characteristics of units available for occupancy, and homeownership rates in the United States. These data are used extensively by public and private sector organizations to evaluate the need for new housing programs and initiatives. In addition, the rental vacancy rate is a component of the index of leading economic indicators and is used by the federal government and economic forecasters to gauge the current economic climate. Data are collected via the Housing Vacancy Survey, a supplement of the Current Population Survey (CPS). Approximately 72,000 housing units both occupied and vacant are contained in the CPS sample; of these units, about 61,200 are occupied and are eligible for interview each month. Approximately about 10,800 are visited, but found to be vacant, of which about 50% are interviewed.
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Technical Details

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    a| Estimate of the Housing Inventory from the Housing Vacancies and Homeownership Rates database shown in Houses c| Data-Planet by Conquest Systems h| Data Planet Statistical Datasets [electronic resource]
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    a| online resource with data files b| statistical data and abstract.
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    a| Bethesda, MD b| Data-Planet by Conquest Systems c| 2018
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    a| computer dataset b| cod 2| rdacontent
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    a| computer b| c 2| rdamedia
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    a| online resource b| cr 2| rdacarrier
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    a| Statistical data with bibliographic citation and abstract.
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    a| Reports a count of vacant and occupied housing units in the United States. A housing unit is vacant if no one is living in it at the time of the interview, unless its occupants are only temporarily absent. In addition, a vacant unit may be one that is entirely occupied by persons who have a usual residence elsewhere. New units not yet occupied are classified as vacant housing units if construction has reached a point where all exterior windows and doors are installed and final usable floors are in place. Vacant housing units are classified as year round or seasonal. Year-round units are those intended for occupancy at any time of the year, even though they may not be in use the year round. Year-round units include vacant units offered for rent and those offered both for rent and sale; vacant units for sale only, which excludes units both for rent and sale; vacant units rented or sold; vacant units held off the market, which includes units held for occasional use, temporarily occupied by persons with usual residence elsewhere, and vacant for other reasons (eg, held for occupancy of a caretaker, settlement of an estate, or personal reasons of the owner. Seasonal housing units are those intended for occupancy only during certain seasons of the year and are found primarily in resort areas. Housing units held for occupancy by migratory labor employed in farm work during the crop season are also tabulated as seasonal. A housing unit is considered occupied if a person or group of persons is living in it at the time of the interview or if the occupants are only temporarily absent, eg, on vacation. The persons living in the unit must consider it their usual place of residence or have no usual place of residence elsewhere. The count of occupied housing units is the same as the count of households. Occupied housing units are further distinguished as owner vs renter occupied. The Housing Vacancies and Homeownership dataset provides quarterly national- and regional-level information on rental and homeowner vacancy rates, characteristics of units available for occupancy, and homeownership rates in the United States. These data are used extensively by public and private sector organizations to evaluate the need for new housing programs and initiatives. In addition, the rental vacancy rate is a component of the index of leading economic indicators and is used by the federal government and economic forecasters to gauge the current economic climate. Data are collected via the Housing Vacancy Survey, a supplement of the Current Population Survey (CPS). Approximately 72,000 housing units both occupied and vacant are contained in the CPS sample; of these units, about 61,200 are occupied and are eligible for interview each month. Approximately about 10,800 are visited, but found to be vacant, of which about 50% are interviewed.
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    a| Housing Inventory
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    a| Occupancy Rates
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    a| Owner-Occupied Housing
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    a| Rental Housing
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    a| Residential Buildings
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    a| Residential Property
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    a| Vacancy Rates
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    a| USA
    856
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    0
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