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Patient Safety and Quality, the New Currency of Academic Medicine

University of Virginia. School of Medicine
Format
Online; Online Video; Video
Type
Filmed Lectures
Date
2014-03-12
Duration
1:01:27
Summary
Primum non nocere--"first, do no harm"--is a fundamental principle of medical practice, expressing both the hope and humility of physicians. It cautions doctors that even with the best intentions may come unwarranted consequences. One present-day application of this principle has to do with efforts to eliminate hospital-acquired infections. When we define such infections as inevitable if regrettable collateral damage wherever complex care is provided to very sick patients, we create a rationale for paying for them and institutionalize their harm. And we may lose sight of their tragic human and economic costs, and of clinicians' own involvement. The annual Richardson memorial lecture addresses the human toll of medical error and calls for improved patient safety. In this Richardson lecture, Dr. Richard Shannon challenges the academic medical center not only to create safer systems that prevent bloodstream infections but also to invest every frontline worker with the capability and responsibility to see and solve problems before they propagate into error. Importantly, this is about more than safety. It is about culture change, creating a culture of habitual excellence in everything we do. Safety is simply the unassailable starting point. Another foundational medical principle applies: Cura te ipsum--"physician, heal thyself." Co-presented with the Patient Safety Committee, UVA Health System
Creator
University of Virginia. School of Medicine
Moderator
Childress, Marcia Day
Speaker
Shannon, Richard P.
Publisher
Claude Moore Health Sciences Library
Language
English
Collection
Medical Center Hour
Related Resources
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Terms of Use
The speakers in this presentation have given the University of Virginia permission to make it freely accessible online for all audiences to view. To request permission to reproduce, republish, and/or repost this presentation please contact the Historical Collections and Services Department of the Claude Moore Health Sciences Library at the University of Virginia.
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