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Faith Matters Survey, 2006 [electronic resource]

Robert D. Putnam, David E. Campbell
Format
Computer Resource; Online
Published
Ann Arbor, Mich. Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor] 2016
Edition
2016-03-22
Series
ICPSR
ICPSR (Series)
Access Restriction
AVAILABLE. This study is freely available to ICPSR member institutions.
Abstract
The Faith Matters (FM) Survey was conducted on behalf of Harvard University by International Communications Research in the summer of 2006. The national survey interviewed approximately 3,100 respondents in an hour-long phone survey both about their religion (beliefs, belongings and behavior) and their social and political engagement. The 2006 Faith Matters Survey provides the bulk of the data in the book American Grace: How Religion Divides and Unites us by Campbell and Putnam. Wherever possible the Faith Matters Survey replicated questions asked in other surveys, enabling the research team to validate findings with different sources of data (including the General Social Survey and the National Election Studies). Interviews were conducted in both English and Spanish. To ensure the accuracy of the Spanish translation, the team had the survey backward-translated into English after completion. When asked if they would like to participate in the survey, respondents were not told that it was a study about religion. Instead, interviewers introduced themselves and said that the survey was being conducted on behalf of researchers at Harvard and Notre Dame, and that it was "on some current events". Demographic variables in this study include age, gender, education, household income, ethnicity, political ideology, and citizenship.Cf: http://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR36315.v1
Contents
Public Use Data
Description
Mode of access: Intranet.
Notes
Title from ICPSR DDI metadata of 2016-03-23.
Series Statement
ICPSR 36315
ICPSR (Series) 36315
Other Forms
Also available as downloadable files.
Copyright Not EvaluatedCopyright Not Evaluated
Technical Details
  • Staff View

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    a| The Faith Matters (FM) Survey was conducted on behalf of Harvard University by International Communications Research in the summer of 2006. The national survey interviewed approximately 3,100 respondents in an hour-long phone survey both about their religion (beliefs, belongings and behavior) and their social and political engagement. The 2006 Faith Matters Survey provides the bulk of the data in the book American Grace: How Religion Divides and Unites us by Campbell and Putnam. Wherever possible the Faith Matters Survey replicated questions asked in other surveys, enabling the research team to validate findings with different sources of data (including the General Social Survey and the National Election Studies). Interviews were conducted in both English and Spanish. To ensure the accuracy of the Spanish translation, the team had the survey backward-translated into English after completion. When asked if they would like to participate in the survey, respondents were not told that it was a study about religion. Instead, interviewers introduced themselves and said that the survey was being conducted on behalf of researchers at Harvard and Notre Dame, and that it was "on some current events". Demographic variables in this study include age, gender, education, household income, ethnicity, political ideology, and citizenship.Cf: http://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR36315.v1
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