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After the JD, Wave 3 [electronic resource]: A Longitudinal Study of Careers in Transition, 2012-2013, United States

Robert Nelson, Ronit Dinovitzer, Gabriele Plickert, Joyce Sterling, Bryant Garth
Format
Computer Resource; Online
Published
Ann Arbor, Mich. Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor] 2014
Edition
2014-11-25
Series
ICPSR
ICPSR (Series)
Access Restriction
AVAILABLE. This study is freely available to ICPSR member institutions.
Abstract
The After the JD (AJD) project is a longitudinal study that was designed to track the careers of a nationally representative cohort of lawyers admitted to the bar in the year 2000. This collection is the third wave of the After the JD Project. The first wave of the After the JD project (AJD1) [ICPSR 26302] provided a snapshot of the personal lives and careers of this cohort about three years after they began practicing law. The second wave of the After the JD project (AJD2) [ICPSR 33584] sought to illuminate the progression of lawyers' careers through roughly seven years in practice. The third wave (AJD3) continued to shed light on lawyers' 12-year professional and personal pathways. After 12 years, the AJD lawyers had a decade of work experience behind them, and the contours of their careers were more clearly shaped. Throughout their professional careers, these lawyers had experienced important transitions (such as promotion to partnership, marriage, and job changes), which were only in process by Wave 2. AJD3 marked a significant milestone, essential to assess the personal and career trajectories of this cohort of lawyers. AJD3 sought to locate and survey only individuals who had previously responded to either AJD1 or AJD2. Sample members who never responded to any survey wave were not located in AJD3. The AJD3 data collection started in May 2012 and was completed in early 2013. The dataset allowed for the analysis of a broad range of questions about the careers of lawyers and the social organization of the American legal profession. Topics covered include current professional employment, impact of economic downturn, type of work, clients, mentors, employment history, social, political, and community participation, and background and family information. Demographics include ethnicity, employment status, sexuality, marital status, age, and gender.Cf: http://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR35480.v1
Contents
Dataset
Description
Mode of access: Intranet.
Notes
Title from ICPSR DDI metadata of 2016-02-11.
Series Statement
ICPSR 35480
ICPSR (Series) 35480
Other Forms
Also available as downloadable files.
Copyright Not EvaluatedCopyright Not Evaluated
Technical Details
  • Staff View

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    a| After the JD, Wave 3 h| [electronic resource] b| A Longitudinal Study of Careers in Transition, 2012-2013, United States c| Robert Nelson, Ronit Dinovitzer, Gabriele Plickert, Joyce Sterling, Bryant Garth
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    a| Ann Arbor, Mich. b| Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor] c| 2014
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    a| ICPSR v| 35480
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    a| Title from ICPSR DDI metadata of 2016-02-11.
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    a| National Science Foundation c| SES 1023067
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    a| The After the JD (AJD) project is a longitudinal study that was designed to track the careers of a nationally representative cohort of lawyers admitted to the bar in the year 2000. This collection is the third wave of the After the JD Project. The first wave of the After the JD project (AJD1) [ICPSR 26302] provided a snapshot of the personal lives and careers of this cohort about three years after they began practicing law. The second wave of the After the JD project (AJD2) [ICPSR 33584] sought to illuminate the progression of lawyers' careers through roughly seven years in practice. The third wave (AJD3) continued to shed light on lawyers' 12-year professional and personal pathways. After 12 years, the AJD lawyers had a decade of work experience behind them, and the contours of their careers were more clearly shaped. Throughout their professional careers, these lawyers had experienced important transitions (such as promotion to partnership, marriage, and job changes), which were only in process by Wave 2. AJD3 marked a significant milestone, essential to assess the personal and career trajectories of this cohort of lawyers. AJD3 sought to locate and survey only individuals who had previously responded to either AJD1 or AJD2. Sample members who never responded to any survey wave were not located in AJD3. The AJD3 data collection started in May 2012 and was completed in early 2013. The dataset allowed for the analysis of a broad range of questions about the careers of lawyers and the social organization of the American legal profession. Topics covered include current professional employment, impact of economic downturn, type of work, clients, mentors, employment history, social, political, and community participation, and background and family information. Demographics include ethnicity, employment status, sexuality, marital status, age, and gender.Cf: http://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR35480.v1
    505
      
      
    t| Dataset
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    7
    a| activism 2| icpsr
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    a| career development 2| icpsr
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    a| careers 2| icpsr
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    7
    a| economic indicators 2| icpsr
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    7
    a| educational background 2| icpsr
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    7
    a| employment discrimination 2| icpsr
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    a| family background 2| icpsr
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    7
    a| harassment 2| icpsr
    650
      
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    a| income 2| icpsr
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    7
    a| job change 2| icpsr
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    7
    a| job history 2| icpsr
    650
      
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    a| job opportunities 2| icpsr
    650
      
    7
    a| job satisfaction 2| icpsr
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    7
    a| job security 2| icpsr
    650
      
    7
    a| job skills 2| icpsr
    650
      
    7
    a| law school students 2| icpsr
    650
      
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    a| minorities 2| icpsr
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    a| occupational mobility 2| icpsr
    650
      
    7
    a| political participation 2| icpsr
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    7
    a| student financial aid 2| icpsr
    650
      
    7
    a| student loans 2| icpsr
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    7
    a| time utilization 2| icpsr
    650
      
    7
    a| training 2| icpsr
    650
      
    7
    a| work environment 2| icpsr
    650
      
    7
    a| workplaces 2| icpsr
    653
    0
      
    a| ICPSR XVII.D. Social Institutions and Behavior, Age and the Life Cycle
    700
    2
      
    a| Nelson, Robert u| American Bar Foundation
    700
    2
      
    a| Dinovitzer, Ronit u| American Bar Foundation
    700
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    a| Plickert, Gabriele u| American Bar Foundation
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    a| Sterling, Joyce u| University of Denver. Sturm College of Law
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    a| Garth, Bryant u| University of California-Irvine, and American Bar Foundation
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