Item Details

Print View

Health Consequences of Long-Term Injection Heroin Use Among Aging Mexican American Men in Houston, Texas, 2008 - 2011 [Restricted-Use Files] [electronic resource]

Patrick Bordnick
Format
Computer Resource; Online
Published
Ann Arbor, Mich. Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor] 2014
Edition
2015-01-21
Series
ICPSR
ICPSR (Series)
Access Restriction
AVAILABLE. This study is freely available to the general public.
Abstract

The study is comprised of interviews from 227 Hispanic males aged 45 or older living in the area of Houston, Texas to address the gaps in knowledge on the social factors and health consequences of injection heroin use among aging Mexican American males. Specifically, the study investigated how the life course transitions of incarceration and drug treatment and drug abuse and family trajectories affect both the heroin career status and health consequences of these aging Mexican American men.

The study used a cross-sectional, field-intensive outreach methodology augmented with respondent-driven sampling. Recruitment was focused in two Houston neighborhoods that are predominantly Mexican American areas with high rates of crime, poverty, and psychosocial challenges. Trained Outreach Specialists familiar with these communities identified community gatekeepers and gained their trust through continued presence in the community and ongoing dialogue about the study. These gatekeepers then helped identify individuals meeting the inclusion criteria: Mexican American men aged 45 years or older with a history of injection drug use for at least 3 years. The men were then classified into one of three groups: current injectors (current group), former injectors not in treatment (former group), or former injectors currently enrolled in methadone maintenance treatment programs (MMTP group).

The second part is a second survey asking questions about social networks the respondent participates in. Questions ask the respondent to answer on one individual in their network and answer questions about that person and their interaction with them. Questions include basic demographics, history injecting drugs and sexual contact with the person.

Cf: http://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR34896.v2
Contents
  • Respondent Survey
  • Social Network Survey
Description
Mode of access: Intranet.
Notes
Title from ICPSR DDI metadata of 2016-02-11.
Series Statement
ICPSR 34896
ICPSR (Series) 34896
Other Forms
Also available as downloadable files.
Copyright Not EvaluatedCopyright Not Evaluated
Technical Details
  • Staff View

    LEADER 04227cmm a2200625la 4500
    001 ICPSR34896
    003 MiAaI
    006 m f a u
    007 cr mn mmmmuuuu
    008 160211s2014 miu f a eng d
    035
      
      
    a| (MiAaI)ICPSR34896
    040
      
      
    a| MiAaI c| MiAaI
    245
    0
    0
    a| Health Consequences of Long-Term Injection Heroin Use Among Aging Mexican American Men in Houston, Texas, 2008 - 2011 [Restricted-use Files] h| [electronic resource] c| Patrick Bordnick
    250
      
      
    a| 2015-01-21
    260
      
      
    a| Ann Arbor, Mich. b| Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor] c| 2014
    490
      
      
    a| ICPSR v| 34896
    516
      
      
    a| Numeric
    538
      
      
    a| Mode of access: Intranet.
    500
      
      
    a| Title from ICPSR DDI metadata of 2016-02-11.
    536
      
      
    a| United States Department of Health and Human Services. National Institutes of Health. National Institute on Drug Abuse c| R24 DA019798
    506
      
      
    a| AVAILABLE. This study is freely available to the general public.
    530
      
      
    a| Also available as downloadable files.
    522
      
      
    a| Texas
    522
      
      
    a| United States
    520
    3
      
    a| <p>The study is comprised of interviews from 227 Hispanic males aged 45 or older living in the area of Houston, Texas to address the gaps in knowledge on the social factors and health consequences of injection heroin use among aging Mexican American males. Specifically, the study investigated how the life course transitions of incarceration and drug treatment and drug abuse and family trajectories affect both the heroin career status and health consequences of these aging Mexican American men.</p> <p>The study used a cross-sectional, field-intensive outreach methodology augmented with respondent-driven sampling. Recruitment was focused in two Houston neighborhoods that are predominantly Mexican American areas with high rates of crime, poverty, and psychosocial challenges. Trained Outreach Specialists familiar with these communities identified community gatekeepers and gained their trust through continued presence in the community and ongoing dialogue about the study. These gatekeepers then helped identify individuals meeting the inclusion criteria: Mexican American men aged 45 years or older with a history of injection drug use for at least 3 years. The men were then classified into one of three groups: current injectors (current group), former injectors not in treatment (former group), or former injectors currently enrolled in methadone maintenance treatment programs (MMTP group).</p><p>The second part is a second survey asking questions about social networks the respondent participates in. Questions ask the respondent to answer on one individual in their network and answer questions about that person and their interaction with them. Questions include basic demographics, history injecting drugs and sexual contact with the person.</p>Cf: http://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR34896.v2
    505
      
      
    t| Respondent Survey
    505
      
      
    t| Social Network Survey
    567
      
      
    a| Hispanic males aged 45 or older with a history of heroin injection.
    650
      
    7
    a| AIDS 2| icpsr
    650
      
    7
    a| children 2| icpsr
    650
      
    7
    a| criminality 2| icpsr
    650
      
    7
    a| drug abuse 2| icpsr
    650
      
    7
    a| family background 2| icpsr
    650
      
    7
    a| health 2| icpsr
    650
      
    7
    a| heroin 2| icpsr
    650
      
    7
    a| Hispanic or Latino Americans 2| icpsr
    650
      
    7
    a| HIV 2| icpsr
    650
      
    7
    a| imprisonment 2| icpsr
    650
      
    7
    a| income 2| icpsr
    650
      
    7
    a| intravenous drug use 2| icpsr
    650
      
    7
    a| memory 2| icpsr
    650
      
    7
    a| religion 2| icpsr
    650
      
    7
    a| sexual behavior 2| icpsr
    650
      
    7
    a| social capital 2| icpsr
    650
      
    7
    a| social networks 2| icpsr
    650
      
    7
    a| substance abuse treatment 2| icpsr
    653
    0
      
    a| RCMD V. Health and Well-Being
    653
    0
      
    a| ICPSR IX. Health Care and Health Facilities
    653
    0
      
    a| ICPSR XVI.A. Social Indicators, United States
    653
    0
      
    a| RCMD IX.E. Latino
    653
    0
      
    a| NAHDAP I. National Addiction and HIV Data Archive Program
    700
    2
      
    a| Bordnick, Patrick u| University of Houston
    710
    2
      
    a| Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research.
    830
      
    0
    a| ICPSR (Series) v| 34896
    856
    4
    0
    u| http://proxy.its.virginia.edu/login?url=http://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR34896.v2
    999
      
      
    w| WEB l| INTERNET m| UVA-LIB t| INTERNET
▾See more
▴See less

Availability

Access Online