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Chicago Male Drug Use and Health Survey (MSM Supplement), 2002-2003 [electronic resource]

Michael Fendrich, Timothy Johnson
Format
Computer Resource; Online; Dataset
Published
Ann Arbor, Mich. Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor] 2012
Edition
2012-08-01
Series
ICPSR
ICPSR (Series)
Access Restriction
AVAILABLE. This study is freely available to the general public.
Abstract
In recent years, club drugs such as MDMA, Ketamine, GHB, and Rohypnol have emerged as major drugs of abuse. The national and local Chicago news media have publicized law enforcement actions and adverse health outcomes, including fatalities, related to the abuse of these substances. Media accounts and a limited body of research have identified use of these substances as prevalent in the gay male community. This prevalence coincides with recent increases in HIV seropositive incidence. There is a clear need for a more comprehensive understanding of the prevalence of club drug use in the general population, and particularly in the subgroup of sexually active gay men. Noting these research gaps and their considerable adverse public health implications, this supplemental study was designed to apply an expanded protocol developed from an earlier study conducted (Feasibility and Use of Biological Measurement in Drug Surveys; R01DA12425, SRL Study #860) to a sample of gay men in the city of Chicago (Michael Fendrich, Principal Investigator). This study evaluated whether findings regarding the feasibility and use of drug testing in drug surveys derived from general population samples are generalizable to a probability sample of 216 gay men in the city of Chicago. For this project, a supplemental module was added to the main study survey that asked detailed questions about involvement in the gay community, risky sexual activity and HIV seropositivity. The scope of biological measurement was also expanded to incorporate testing for Rohypnol and Ketamine in hair (MDMA was already being tested as part of the general sample hair screen). The dataset contains 676 variables.Cf: http://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR34303.v2
Contents
Dataset
Description
Mode of access: Intranet.
Notes
Title from ICPSR DDI metadata of 2016-02-11.
Series Statement
ICPSR 34303
ICPSR (Series) 34303
Other Forms
Also available as downloadable files.
Copyright Not EvaluatedCopyright Not Evaluated
Technical Details
  • Staff View

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    a| MiAaI c| MiAaI
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    a| Chicago Male Drug Use and Health Survey (MSM Supplement), 2002-2003 h| [electronic resource] c| Michael Fendrich, Timothy Johnson
    250
      
      
    a| 2012-08-01
    260
      
      
    a| Ann Arbor, Mich. b| Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor] c| 2012
    490
      
      
    a| ICPSR v| 34303
    516
      
      
    a| Numeric
    538
      
      
    a| Mode of access: Intranet.
    500
      
      
    a| Title from ICPSR DDI metadata of 2016-02-11.
    536
      
      
    a| United States Department of Health and Human Services. National Institutes of Health. National Institute on Drug Abuse c| R01 DA12425-02S1, R01 DA018625
    506
      
      
    a| AVAILABLE. This study is freely available to the general public.
    530
      
      
    a| Also available as downloadable files.
    522
      
      
    a| Chicago
    522
      
      
    a| Illinois
    522
      
      
    a| United States
    520
    3
      
    a| In recent years, club drugs such as MDMA, Ketamine, GHB, and Rohypnol have emerged as major drugs of abuse. The national and local Chicago news media have publicized law enforcement actions and adverse health outcomes, including fatalities, related to the abuse of these substances. Media accounts and a limited body of research have identified use of these substances as prevalent in the gay male community. This prevalence coincides with recent increases in HIV seropositive incidence. There is a clear need for a more comprehensive understanding of the prevalence of club drug use in the general population, and particularly in the subgroup of sexually active gay men. Noting these research gaps and their considerable adverse public health implications, this supplemental study was designed to apply an expanded protocol developed from an earlier study conducted (Feasibility and Use of Biological Measurement in Drug Surveys; R01DA12425, SRL Study #860) to a sample of gay men in the city of Chicago (Michael Fendrich, Principal Investigator). This study evaluated whether findings regarding the feasibility and use of drug testing in drug surveys derived from general population samples are generalizable to a probability sample of 216 gay men in the city of Chicago. For this project, a supplemental module was added to the main study survey that asked detailed questions about involvement in the gay community, risky sexual activity and HIV seropositivity. The scope of biological measurement was also expanded to incorporate testing for Rohypnol and Ketamine in hair (MDMA was already being tested as part of the general sample hair screen). The dataset contains 676 variables.Cf: http://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR34303.v2
    505
      
      
    t| Dataset
    567
      
      
    a| Eligible men between the ages of 18 and 55 who self-identified as being homosexual, bisexual, or as having ever had sex with another man, living in households within two Chicago ZIP codes.
    650
      
    7
    a| addiction 2| icpsr
    650
      
    7
    a| AIDS 2| icpsr
    650
      
    7
    a| alcohol consumption 2| icpsr
    650
      
    7
    a| barbiturates 2| icpsr
    650
      
    7
    a| cocaine 2| icpsr
    650
      
    7
    a| crack cocaine 2| icpsr
    650
      
    7
    a| demographic characteristics 2| icpsr
    650
      
    7
    a| drug use 2| icpsr
    650
      
    7
    a| emotional problems 2| icpsr
    650
      
    7
    a| gay community 2| icpsr
    650
      
    7
    a| hallucinogens 2| icpsr
    650
      
    7
    a| health behavior 2| icpsr
    650
      
    7
    a| heroin 2| icpsr
    650
      
    7
    a| HIV 2| icpsr
    650
      
    7
    a| homelessness 2| icpsr
    650
      
    7
    a| homosexuality 2| icpsr
    650
      
    7
    a| inhalants 2| icpsr
    650
      
    7
    a| marijuana 2| icpsr
    650
      
    7
    a| men 2| icpsr
    650
      
    7
    a| methamphetamine 2| icpsr
    650
      
    7
    a| outreach programs 2| icpsr
    650
      
    7
    a| self medication 2| icpsr
    650
      
    7
    a| sexual behavior 2| icpsr
    650
      
    7
    a| sexual preference 2| icpsr
    650
      
    7
    a| smoking 2| icpsr
    650
      
    7
    a| social behavior 2| icpsr
    650
      
    7
    a| stimulants 2| icpsr
    650
      
    7
    a| substance abuse 2| icpsr
    650
      
    7
    a| tobacco use 2| icpsr
    650
      
    7
    a| treatment 2| icpsr
    653
    0
      
    a| FENWAY III. Gay/Bisexual Men
    653
    0
      
    a| NAHDAP I. National Addiction and HIV Data Archive Program
    653
    0
      
    a| ICPSR XVII. Social Institutions and Behavior
    700
    2
      
    a| Fendrich, Michael u| University of Illinois at Chicago. Institute for Juvenile Research
    700
    2
      
    a| Johnson, Timothy u| University of Illinois at Chicago. Survey Research Laboratory
    710
    2
      
    a| Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research.
    830
      
    0
    a| ICPSR (Series) v| 34303
    856
    4
    0
    u| http://proxy01.its.virginia.edu/login?url=http://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR34303.v2
    999
      
      
    w| WEB l| INTERNET m| UVA-LIB t| INTERNET
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