Item Details

Print View

Generational Memory and the Critical Period [electronic resource]: Evidence for National and World Events, 1985-2010

Howard Schuman, Amy Corning
Format
Computer Resource; Online; Dataset
Published
Ann Arbor, Mich. Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor] 2012
Edition
2012-01-23
Series
ICPSR
ICPSR (Series)
Access Restriction
AVAILABLE. This study is freely available to the general public.
Abstract
Investigators of this study bring together survey data from sources both new and old in order to test the generational hypothesis that national and world events experienced during a "critical period" of later childhood, adolescence, and early adulthood have a disproportionate effect on memories, attitudes, and actions in later life. Also considered were competing explanations for the same evidence, especially interpretations based on period and recency effects. The data come from nine surveys, mostly national, carried out in the United States and in six other countries (China, Germany, Israel, Japan, Lithuania, and Russia), between 1985 and 2010. The hypothesis is largely supported for recall of past events, and also for commemorative behavior connected to World War II and to the Vietnam War. The evidence is mixed with regard to attitudes toward the Gulf War and the Iraq invasion, emphasizing the distinction between generational effects that result from lifetime experience and those due to a critical period. The analysis considered most of the major events faced by Americans over the past 80 years, ranging from the Great Depression to current issues, including such national traumas as the assassination of President Kennedy, the Vietnam War, and the September 11, 2001, terrorist attack. Comparable events in other countries were also examined.Cf: http://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR33001.v1
Contents
Dataset
Description
Mode of access: Intranet.
Notes
Title from ICPSR DDI metadata of 2016-02-11.
Series Statement
ICPSR 33001
ICPSR (Series) 33001
Other Forms
Also available as downloadable files.
Copyright Not EvaluatedCopyright Not Evaluated
Technical Details
  • Staff View

    LEADER 03582cmm a2200625la 4500
    001 ICPSR33001
    003 MiAaI
    006 m f a u
    007 cr mn mmmmuuuu
    008 160211s2012 miu f a eng d
    035
      
      
    a| (MiAaI)ICPSR33001
    040
      
      
    a| MiAaI c| MiAaI
    245
    0
    0
    a| Generational Memory and the Critical Period h| [electronic resource] b| Evidence for National and World Events, 1985-2010 c| Howard Schuman, Amy Corning
    250
      
      
    a| 2012-01-23
    260
      
      
    a| Ann Arbor, Mich. b| Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor] c| 2012
    490
      
      
    a| ICPSR v| 33001
    516
      
      
    a| Numeric
    538
      
      
    a| Mode of access: Intranet.
    500
      
      
    a| Title from ICPSR DDI metadata of 2016-02-11.
    536
      
      
    a| National Science Foundation c| NSF SES 0853381
    506
      
      
    a| AVAILABLE. This study is freely available to the general public.
    530
      
      
    a| Also available as downloadable files.
    522
      
      
    a| China (Peoples Republic)
    522
      
      
    a| Germany
    522
      
      
    a| Global
    522
      
      
    a| Israel
    522
      
      
    a| Japan
    522
      
      
    a| Lithuania
    522
      
      
    a| Russia
    522
      
      
    a| United States
    520
    3
      
    a| Investigators of this study bring together survey data from sources both new and old in order to test the generational hypothesis that national and world events experienced during a "critical period" of later childhood, adolescence, and early adulthood have a disproportionate effect on memories, attitudes, and actions in later life. Also considered were competing explanations for the same evidence, especially interpretations based on period and recency effects. The data come from nine surveys, mostly national, carried out in the United States and in six other countries (China, Germany, Israel, Japan, Lithuania, and Russia), between 1985 and 2010. The hypothesis is largely supported for recall of past events, and also for commemorative behavior connected to World War II and to the Vietnam War. The evidence is mixed with regard to attitudes toward the Gulf War and the Iraq invasion, emphasizing the distinction between generational effects that result from lifetime experience and those due to a critical period. The analysis considered most of the major events faced by Americans over the past 80 years, ranging from the Great Depression to current issues, including such national traumas as the assassination of President Kennedy, the Vietnam War, and the September 11, 2001, terrorist attack. Comparable events in other countries were also examined.Cf: http://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR33001.v1
    505
      
      
    t| Dataset
    650
      
    7
    a| adults 2| icpsr
    650
      
    7
    a| attitudes 2| icpsr
    650
      
    7
    a| child development 2| icpsr
    650
      
    7
    a| childhood 2| icpsr
    650
      
    7
    a| coping 2| icpsr
    650
      
    7
    a| emotional development 2| icpsr
    650
      
    7
    a| experience 2| icpsr
    650
      
    7
    a| life events 2| icpsr
    650
      
    7
    a| mental health 2| icpsr
    650
      
    7
    a| psychological effects 2| icpsr
    650
      
    7
    a| September 11 attack 2| icpsr
    650
      
    7
    a| terrorism 2| icpsr
    650
      
    7
    a| Vietnam War 2| icpsr
    650
      
    7
    a| war 2| icpsr
    650
      
    7
    a| world problems 2| icpsr
    650
      
    7
    a| World War II 2| icpsr
    650
      
    7
    a| world wars 2| icpsr
    653
    0
      
    a| ICPSR XVIII. Replication Datasets
    700
    2
      
    a| Schuman, Howard u| University of Michigan. Institute for Social Research
    700
    2
      
    a| Corning, Amy u| University of Michigan. Institute for Social Research
    710
    2
      
    a| Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research.
    830
      
    0
    a| ICPSR (Series) v| 33001
    856
    4
    0
    u| http://proxy01.its.virginia.edu/login?url=http://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR33001.v1
    999
      
      
    w| WEB l| INTERNET m| UVA-LIB t| INTERNET
▾See more
▴See less

Availability

Access Online