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Consequences of Recent Parental Divorce for Young Adults, 1990-1992 [electronic resource]

Teresa M. Cooney
Format
Computer Resource; Online
Published
Ann Arbor, Mich. Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor] 2010
Edition
2010-03-12
Series
ICPSR
ICPSR (Series)
Access Restriction
AVAILABLE. This study is freely available to ICPSR member institutions.
Abstract
This longitudinal study focused on examining the consequences of recent parental divorce for young adults (initially ages 18-23) whose parents had divorced within 15 months of the study's first wave (1990-91). The sample consisted of 257 White respondents with newly divorced parents and 228 White respondents who comprised an intact-family comparison group. A life course framework guided the study that focused heavily on young adult transition behaviors (entries and exits from home, work, school, cohabitation and marriage relationships, parenthood), family relationships (relationships with mother and father, siblings, grandparents), and well-being and adjustment (depression, coping). For respondents in the divorced-parents group, additional questions were asked about specific aspects of the divorce and their involvement in it. A follow-up telephone interview conducted two years later assessed life changes and subsequent adjustment over time for both groups of respondents. Specific questions addressed the sexual history of respondents and their most recent sexual partner, including the perceived risk of HIV/AIDS, history of sexual transmitted disease, the use of contraception, how much information they had shared with each other regarding their sexual attitudes and behaviors, and respondent's knowledge of the AIDS virus. Information was also collected on marital/cohabitation history, employment history, reproductive history, including the number and outcome of all pregnancies, physical and mental health, and tobacco, alcohol and drug use. Demographic variables include respondent's sex, age, occupation, employment status, marital/cohabitation status, number of children, current enrollment in school, past and present religious preferences, frequency of religious attendance, military service, and the number, sex, and age of siblings. Demographic information also includes the age, education level, employment status, and annual income of the respondent's parents, as well as the age, race, and education level of the respondent's most recent sexual partner. For those respondents whose parents were recently divorced, demographic information was collected on each parent's current marital status and the age of their new spouse or partner.Cf: http://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR24400.v1
Contents
Consequences of Recent Parental Divorce for Young Adults, 1990-1992
Description
Mode of access: Intranet.
Notes
Title from ICPSR DDI metadata of 2016-02-11.
Series Statement
ICPSR 24400
ICPSR (Series) 24400
Other Forms
Also available as downloadable files.
Copyright Not EvaluatedCopyright Not Evaluated
Technical Details
  • Staff View

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    a| This longitudinal study focused on examining the consequences of recent parental divorce for young adults (initially ages 18-23) whose parents had divorced within 15 months of the study's first wave (1990-91). The sample consisted of 257 White respondents with newly divorced parents and 228 White respondents who comprised an intact-family comparison group. A life course framework guided the study that focused heavily on young adult transition behaviors (entries and exits from home, work, school, cohabitation and marriage relationships, parenthood), family relationships (relationships with mother and father, siblings, grandparents), and well-being and adjustment (depression, coping). For respondents in the divorced-parents group, additional questions were asked about specific aspects of the divorce and their involvement in it. A follow-up telephone interview conducted two years later assessed life changes and subsequent adjustment over time for both groups of respondents. Specific questions addressed the sexual history of respondents and their most recent sexual partner, including the perceived risk of HIV/AIDS, history of sexual transmitted disease, the use of contraception, how much information they had shared with each other regarding their sexual attitudes and behaviors, and respondent's knowledge of the AIDS virus. Information was also collected on marital/cohabitation history, employment history, reproductive history, including the number and outcome of all pregnancies, physical and mental health, and tobacco, alcohol and drug use. Demographic variables include respondent's sex, age, occupation, employment status, marital/cohabitation status, number of children, current enrollment in school, past and present religious preferences, frequency of religious attendance, military service, and the number, sex, and age of siblings. Demographic information also includes the age, education level, employment status, and annual income of the respondent's parents, as well as the age, race, and education level of the respondent's most recent sexual partner. For those respondents whose parents were recently divorced, demographic information was collected on each parent's current marital status and the age of their new spouse or partner.Cf: http://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR24400.v1
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    a| Two groups: (1) White young adults, ages 18-23, whose parents divorced from a first marriage in the state of Maryland in the period from November 1989 through May 1990, (2) White young adults, ages 18-23, listed on Maryland's motor vehicle registration list of licensed drivers in February 1990 and whose parents were still in intact first marriages.
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