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HIV Transmission Network Metastudy Project [electronic resource]: An Archive of Data From Eight Network Studies, 1988--2001

Martina Morris, Richard Rothenberg
Format
Computer Resource; Online
Published
Ann Arbor, Mich. Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor] 2011
Edition
2011-08-09
Series
ICPSR
ICPSR (Series)
Access Restriction
AVAILABLE. This study is freely available to the general public.
Abstract

The purpose of this project was to establish a collection of datasets that could be used (1) to analyze the influence of partnership networks on the transmission of sexually transmitted and blood-borne infections, and (2) to examine the influence of study design on estimation of network properties and impacts. Eight studies contributed datasets to the collection.

They include:

  1. Colorado Springs Project 90, 1988-1992
  2. Bushwick [Brooklyn, NY] Social Factors and HIV Risk (SFHR) Study, 1991-1993
  3. Atlanta Urban Networks Project, 1996-1999
  4. Flagstaff Rural Network Study, 1996-1998
  5. Atlanta Antiretroviral Adherence Study, 1998-2001
  6. Houston Risk Networks Study, 1997-1998
  7. Baltimore SHIELD (Self-Help in Eliminating Life-Threatening Diseases), 1997-1999
  8. Manitoba Chlamydia Study, 1997-1998
  9. Each study contains information on sexual, needle sharing, and/or social networks. Each dataset was harmonized to permit comparative analysis. Almost all of the studies were research projects funded by federal agency sources (e.g., United States Centers for Disease Control and the National Institutes of Health); one was funded by Canadian sources. These studies, all closed for further enrollment, provide a range of designs and study types as well as a range of transmitted diseases. This allows researchers to investigate the relative effect of personal behavior and network connections on the dynamics of disease transmission, and to explore the impact of sampling design on estimation of network properties. Respondents were asked questions about different test results such as HIV, chlamydia, syphilis and hepatitis. Demographic variables include race, ethnicity, marital status, age, and gender.

    Cf: http://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR22140.v1
Contents
  • Persons
  • Pairs of Persons
  • Egodyads
  • Altdyads
Description
Mode of access: Intranet.
Notes
Title from ICPSR DDI metadata of 2016-02-11.
Series Statement
ICPSR 22140
ICPSR (Series) 22140
Other Forms
Also available as downloadable files.
Copyright Not EvaluatedCopyright Not Evaluated
Technical Details
  • Staff View

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    a| Title from ICPSR DDI metadata of 2016-02-11.
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    a| United States Department of Health and Human Services. National Institutes of Health. National Institute on Drug Abuse c| R01-DA012831
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    a| Colorado
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    a| Colorado Springs
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    a| Flagstaff
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    a| <p>The purpose of this project was to establish a collection of datasets that could be used (1) to analyze the influence of partnership networks on the transmission of sexually transmitted and blood-borne infections, and (2) to examine the influence of study design on estimation of network properties and impacts. Eight studies contributed datasets to the collection.</p> <p>They include:</p> <list type="ordered"> <itm>Colorado Springs Project 90, 1988-1992</itm> <itm>Bushwick [Brooklyn, NY] Social Factors and HIV Risk (SFHR) Study, 1991-1993</itm> <itm>Atlanta Urban Networks Project, 1996-1999</itm> <itm>Flagstaff Rural Network Study, 1996-1998</itm> <itm>Atlanta Antiretroviral Adherence Study, 1998-2001</itm> <itm>Houston Risk Networks Study, 1997-1998</itm> <itm>Baltimore SHIELD (Self-Help in Eliminating Life-Threatening Diseases), 1997-1999</itm> <itm>Manitoba Chlamydia Study, 1997-1998</itm></list> <p>Each study contains information on sexual, needle sharing, and/or social networks. Each dataset was harmonized to permit comparative analysis. Almost all of the studies were research projects funded by federal agency sources (e.g., United States Centers for Disease Control and the National Institutes of Health); one was funded by Canadian sources. These studies, all closed for further enrollment, provide a range of designs and study types as well as a range of transmitted diseases. This allows researchers to investigate the relative effect of personal behavior and network connections on the dynamics of disease transmission, and to explore the impact of sampling design on estimation of network properties. Respondents were asked questions about different test results such as HIV, chlamydia, syphilis and hepatitis. Demographic variables include race, ethnicity, marital status, age, and gender.</p>Cf: http://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR22140.v1
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    t| Pairs of Persons -- Egodyads
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    t| Pairs of Persons -- Altdyads
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    a| Not explicitly defined.
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    a| sexual disease 2| icpsr
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    a| sexual orientation 2| icpsr
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    a| NAHDAP I. National Addiction and HIV Data Archive Program
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    a| DATAPASS I. NDIIPP
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    a| Morris, Martina u| University of Washington. Center for AIDS Research
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    a| Rothenberg, Richard u| Emory University. Rollins School of Public Health
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    a| Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research.
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    a| ICPSR (Series) v| 22140
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