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Soviet Interview Project, 1979-1985 [electronic resource]

James R. Millar, Barbara A. Anderson, Donna Bahry, John Garrard, Paul R. Gregory, Rasma Karklins, Norman Nie, Brian D. Silver, Michael Swafford, Aaron Vinokur, William Zimmerman
Format
Computer Resource; Online
Published
Ann Arbor, Mich. Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor] 1987
Edition
1992-02-16
Series
ICPSR
ICPSR (Series)
Access Restriction
AVAILABLE. This study is freely available to ICPSR member institutions.
Abstract
This survey was undertaken to study everyday life in the Soviet Union by conducting highly-structured interviews with a probability sample of eligible Soviet emigrants in the United States. An interdisciplinary research team constructed a questionnaire with the expectation that the results would contribute not only to Sovietology, but to general theories in a number of academic disciplines, especially political science, economics, and sociology. Respondents were asked to comment on topics such as: crime, culture and the arts, education, ethnicity (or nationality), family life, fertility, friends, health and diet, housing, income and earnings, language practices, mass media, military experience, political and social opinions, politics, participation in organizations, religion, satisfaction, standard of living, and work. To insure that "normal" life experiences would be described, respondents were asked to define and discuss their last normal period in the USSR. Since applying to emigrate usually brings marked changes in Soviet citizens' lives, respondents reported the month and year in which they applied to emigrate, whether plans to emigrate had significantly changed their lives even before that date, and if so, specified the month and year in which their lives changed. Interviewers then made certain that all descriptions of day-to-day life in the Soviet Union referred to the period before the question of emigration became a significant issue for respondents.Cf: http://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR08694.v2
Contents
  • Raw Data
  • SPSS-X Export File
  • SAS Data Definition Statements
  • Alphabetical Index of Variables
  • Sequential Index of Variables
Description
Mode of access: Intranet.
Notes
Title from ICPSR DDI metadata of 2016-02-11.
Series Statement
ICPSR 8694
ICPSR (Series) 8694
Other Forms
Also available as downloadable files.
Copyright Not EvaluatedCopyright Not Evaluated
Technical Details
  • Staff View

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    a| (MiAaI)ICPSR08694
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    a| MiAaI c| MiAaI
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    a| Soviet Interview Project, 1979-1985 h| [electronic resource] c| James R. Millar, Barbara A. Anderson, Donna Bahry, John Garrard, Paul R. Gregory, Rasma Karklins, Norman Nie, Brian D. Silver, Michael Swafford, Aaron Vinokur, William Zimmerman
    250
      
      
    a| 1992-02-16
    260
      
      
    a| Ann Arbor, Mich. b| Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor] c| 1987
    490
      
      
    a| ICPSR v| 8694
    516
      
      
    a| Numeric
    538
      
      
    a| Mode of access: Intranet.
    500
      
      
    a| Title from ICPSR DDI metadata of 2016-02-11.
    536
      
      
    a| National Council for Soviet and East European Research c| 701
    506
      
      
    a| AVAILABLE. This study is freely available to ICPSR member institutions.
    530
      
      
    a| Also available as downloadable files.
    522
      
      
    a| Global
    522
      
      
    a| United States
    520
    3
      
    a| This survey was undertaken to study everyday life in the Soviet Union by conducting highly-structured interviews with a probability sample of eligible Soviet emigrants in the United States. An interdisciplinary research team constructed a questionnaire with the expectation that the results would contribute not only to Sovietology, but to general theories in a number of academic disciplines, especially political science, economics, and sociology. Respondents were asked to comment on topics such as: crime, culture and the arts, education, ethnicity (or nationality), family life, fertility, friends, health and diet, housing, income and earnings, language practices, mass media, military experience, political and social opinions, politics, participation in organizations, religion, satisfaction, standard of living, and work. To insure that "normal" life experiences would be described, respondents were asked to define and discuss their last normal period in the USSR. Since applying to emigrate usually brings marked changes in Soviet citizens' lives, respondents reported the month and year in which they applied to emigrate, whether plans to emigrate had significantly changed their lives even before that date, and if so, specified the month and year in which their lives changed. Interviewers then made certain that all descriptions of day-to-day life in the Soviet Union referred to the period before the question of emigration became a significant issue for respondents.Cf: http://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR08694.v2
    505
      
      
    t| Raw Data
    505
      
      
    t| SPSS-X Export File
    505
      
      
    t| SAS Data Definition Statements
    505
      
      
    t| Alphabetical Index of Variables
    505
      
      
    t| Sequential Index of Variables
    567
      
      
    a| The universe is the fairly complete list of 35,386 emigrants who arrived in the United States between January 1, 1979 and December 31, 1985. However, the focus of the study is the "referent Soviet population" (the sector of Soviet society the survey respondents could represent). The referent Soviet population is the "adult European population in large and medium-sized Soviet cities."
    650
      
    7
    a| crime 2| icpsr
    650
      
    7
    a| education 2| icpsr
    650
      
    7
    a| emigration 2| icpsr
    650
      
    7
    a| ethnicity 2| icpsr
    650
      
    7
    a| everyday life 2| icpsr
    650
      
    7
    a| family life 2| icpsr
    650
      
    7
    a| immigration 2| icpsr
    650
      
    7
    a| income 2| icpsr
    650
      
    7
    a| life satisfaction 2| icpsr
    650
      
    7
    a| living conditions 2| icpsr
    650
      
    7
    a| political participation 2| icpsr
    650
      
    7
    a| politics 2| icpsr
    650
      
    7
    a| public opinion 2| icpsr
    650
      
    7
    a| quality of life 2| icpsr
    650
      
    7
    a| social attitudes 2| icpsr
    650
      
    7
    a| social life 2| icpsr
    650
      
    7
    a| work 2| icpsr
    650
      
    7
    a| work environment 2| icpsr
    653
    0
      
    a| IDRC V. Health Data
    653
    0
      
    a| IDRC II. Economic Data
    653
    0
      
    a| IDRC VII. Public Opinion Data
    653
    0
      
    a| ICPSR XVI.B. Social Indicators, Nations Other Than the United States
    653
    0
      
    a| IDRC III. Electoral Systems and Political Behavior
    653
    0
      
    a| IDRC VI. Human Dimension of International Relations
    653
    0
      
    a| IDRC I. Conflict Data
    700
    2
      
    a| Millar, James R. u| University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
    700
    2
      
    a| Anderson, Barbara A. u| University of Michigan
    700
    2
      
    a| Bahry, Donna u| New York University
    700
    2
      
    a| Garrard, John u| University of Arizona
    700
    2
      
    a| Gregory, Paul R. u| University of Houston
    700
    2
      
    a| Karklins, Rasma u| University of Illinois-Chicago
    700
    2
      
    a| Nie, Norman u| University of Chicago
    700
    2
      
    a| Silver, Brian D. u| Michigan State University
    700
    2
      
    a| Swafford, Michael u| Vanderbilt University
    700
    2
      
    a| Vinokur, Aaron u| University of Haifa (Israel)
    700
    2
      
    a| Zimmerman, William u| University of Michigan
    710
    2
      
    a| Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research.
    830
      
    0
    a| ICPSR (Series) v| 8694
    856
    4
    0
    u| http://proxy.its.virginia.edu/login?url=http://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR08694.v2
    999
      
      
    w| WEB l| INTERNET m| UVA-LIB t| INTERNET
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