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Voting Behavior in Uji, Japan, 1961 [electronic resource]

Ichiro Miyake
Format
Computer Resource; Online
Published
Ann Arbor, Mich. Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor] 1984
Edition
1992-02-16
Series
ICPSR
ICPSR (Series)
Access Restriction
AVAILABLE. This study is freely available to ICPSR member institutions.
Abstract
Respondents to this study were interviewed in five waves in an effort to trace changes and patterns of voting behavior, party support, and interest in politics during several different elections. Wave 1 explored the respondents' political awareness in general: aspects of politics that interested them most, their satisfaction with the Kyoto prefecture, support of the political parties in Japan, and the kinds of elections in which they were most involved. Wave 2, conducted the next year, prior to the gubernatorial election in Kyoto, examined public exposure of the candidates, sources of campaign information, the respondents' interest in the election, and specific facts they had learned about each candidate. Wave 3 interviews were held just after the gubernatorial election and established the effects that issues, mass media, and family and friends had had upon the respondents' votes. Waves 4 and 5 were conducted following elections for the upper house and for mayor, respectively, and each investigated patterns of voting: influences on respondents' votes, their assessments of the qualifications and achievements of the candidates, their tendency to vote for the party or the candidate, and their interest in the election itself. A number of derived measures were developed by the investigator. Among these are scales of political efficacy, conservatism, political party support, traditional/progressive approach to national issues, and familiarity and preference indices for the candidates.Cf: http://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR07072.v1
Contents
Dataset
Description
Mode of access: Intranet.
Notes
Title from ICPSR DDI metadata of 2016-02-11.
Series Statement
ICPSR 7072
ICPSR (Series) 7072
Other Forms
Also available as downloadable files.
Copyright Not EvaluatedCopyright Not Evaluated
Technical Details
  • Staff View

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