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American Public Opinion and U.S. Foreign Policy, 1994 [electronic resource]

Chicago Council on Foreign Relations
Format
Computer Resource; Online
Published
Ann Arbor, Mich. Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor] 1996
Edition
2016-01-27
Series
ICPSR
American Public Opinion and United States Foreign Policy Series
ICPSR (Series)
Access Restriction
AVAILABLE. This study is freely available to ICPSR member institutions.
Abstract
This study is part of a quadrennial series designed to investigate the opinions and attitudes of both the general public and a select group of opinion leaders (or elites) on matters relating to foreign policy, and to define the parameters of public opinion within which decision-makers must operate. Both general public and elite respondents were queried regarding the biggest problems facing the United States, the spending levels for various federal government programs, the role of Congress in determining foreign policy, the impact of foreign policy on issues like prices and unemployment, and the Clinton Administration's handling of various problems such as the overall foreign policy, the overall trade policy, immigration, and the relations with Latin America, Japan, Russia, Cuba, Vietnam, and the Middle East. Questions were also asked about the government's reactions to the ongoing situations in Bosnia, North Korea, Haiti, Cuba, Rwanda, and the Middle East, the importance of various countries to America's vital interests, and possible adversaries or threats to the United States in the near future. Issues like the presence of NATO troops in Western Europe, the military role of Japan and Germany, the economic unification of Western Europe, the Israeli-Palestinian dispute, the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), and the illegal drugs problem were also explored. In addition, the elites were asked several questions about their political party affiliation and the strength of that affiliation. Demographic data such as religious preference, marital status, employment status, household composition, education, age, Hispanic origin, race, sex, and income were only collected for the general population sample.Cf: http://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR06561.v3
Contents
  • Elite Data
  • General Population Data
Description
Mode of access: Intranet.
Notes
Title from ICPSR DDI metadata of 2016-02-11.
Series Statement
ICPSR 6561
ICPSR (Series) 6561
Other Forms
Also available as downloadable files.
Copyright Not EvaluatedCopyright Not Evaluated
Technical Details
  • Staff View

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    a| Ann Arbor, Mich. b| Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor] c| 1996
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    a| Title from ICPSR DDI metadata of 2016-02-11.
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    a| AVAILABLE. This study is freely available to ICPSR member institutions.
    530
      
      
    a| Also available as downloadable files.
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    a| United States
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    3
      
    a| This study is part of a quadrennial series designed to investigate the opinions and attitudes of both the general public and a select group of opinion leaders (or elites) on matters relating to foreign policy, and to define the parameters of public opinion within which decision-makers must operate. Both general public and elite respondents were queried regarding the biggest problems facing the United States, the spending levels for various federal government programs, the role of Congress in determining foreign policy, the impact of foreign policy on issues like prices and unemployment, and the Clinton Administration's handling of various problems such as the overall foreign policy, the overall trade policy, immigration, and the relations with Latin America, Japan, Russia, Cuba, Vietnam, and the Middle East. Questions were also asked about the government's reactions to the ongoing situations in Bosnia, North Korea, Haiti, Cuba, Rwanda, and the Middle East, the importance of various countries to America's vital interests, and possible adversaries or threats to the United States in the near future. Issues like the presence of NATO troops in Western Europe, the military role of Japan and Germany, the economic unification of Western Europe, the Israeli-Palestinian dispute, the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), and the illegal drugs problem were also explored. In addition, the elites were asked several questions about their political party affiliation and the strength of that affiliation. Demographic data such as religious preference, marital status, employment status, household composition, education, age, Hispanic origin, race, sex, and income were only collected for the general population sample.Cf: http://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR06561.v3
    505
      
      
    t| Elite Data
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    t| General Population Data
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    a| DS1: All persons in positions of leadership in the government, academia, business and labor, the media, religious institutions, special interest groups, and private foreign policy organizations. DS2: Adults, aged 18 years and older, living in the United States, except those persons in institutions such as prisons or hospitals.
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    a| European unification 2| icpsr
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    a| foreign affairs 2| icpsr
    650
      
    7
    a| foreign aid 2| icpsr
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    7
    a| foreign policy 2| icpsr
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    7
    a| government spending 2| icpsr
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    a| immigration policy 2| icpsr
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    a| international relations 2| icpsr
    650
      
    7
    a| leadership 2| icpsr
    650
      
    7
    a| military intervention 2| icpsr
    650
      
    7
    a| NAFTA 2| icpsr
    650
      
    7
    a| national elites 2| icpsr
    650
      
    7
    a| national interests 2| icpsr
    650
      
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    a| policy making 2| icpsr
    650
      
    7
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    a| trade policy 2| icpsr
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    a| TPDRC I. Terrorism
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    a| ICPSR XIV.C.1. Mass Political Behavior and Attitudes, Public Opinion on Political Matters, United States
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    a| Chicago Council on Foreign Relations
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    2
      
    a| Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research.
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    a| ICPSR (Series) v| 6561
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