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ABC News/Stanford University/Time Magazine Environment Poll #1, March 2006 [electronic resource]

ABC News, Stanford University, Time Magazine
Format
Computer Resource; Online; Dataset
Published
Ann Arbor, Mich. Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor] 2007
Edition
2007-06-29
Series
ICPSR
ABC News/Washington Post Poll Series
ICPSR (Series)
Access Restriction
AVAILABLE. This study is freely available to ICPSR member institutions.
Abstract
This special topic poll, conducted March 9-14, 2006, is part of a continuing series of monthly polls that solicit public opinion on the presidency and on a range of other political and social issues. The focus of this data collection was on environmental issues. Respondents rated the condition of the natural environment, and identified the most important environmental problem facing the world. Those polled were asked whether they approved of how President George W. Bush, the United States Congress, and American businesses were handling issues involving the natural environment, how much President Bush's policies, American businesses, and the American public did to help or harm the environment in the past year, and how much respondents wanted them to help the natural environment in the next year. Several questions asked how important the issue of global warming was to respondents, how much they knew about it, how serious a problem it was, and how much could be done to prevent future global warming and reduce its effects. Additional topics addressed changing local and worldwide weather patterns, scientists' assessments of the environment and global warming, whether the federal government should require companies and individuals to take measures to reduce global warming, and what type of vehicle respondents drove. Demographic variables include sex, age, race, education level, religious preference, household income, political party affiliation, political philosophy, type of residential area (e.g., urban or rural), whether respondents had any children or grandchildren, and whether they considered themselves born-again or evangelical Christians.Cf: http://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR04658.v1
Contents
ABC News/Stanford University/Time Magazine Environment Poll #1, March 2006, Dataset 0001
Description
Mode of access: Intranet.
Notes
Title from ICPSR DDI metadata of 2016-02-11.
Series Statement
ICPSR 4658
ICPSR (Series) 4658
Other Forms
Also available as downloadable files.
Copyright Not EvaluatedCopyright Not Evaluated
Technical Details
  • Staff View

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    a| This special topic poll, conducted March 9-14, 2006, is part of a continuing series of monthly polls that solicit public opinion on the presidency and on a range of other political and social issues. The focus of this data collection was on environmental issues. Respondents rated the condition of the natural environment, and identified the most important environmental problem facing the world. Those polled were asked whether they approved of how President George W. Bush, the United States Congress, and American businesses were handling issues involving the natural environment, how much President Bush's policies, American businesses, and the American public did to help or harm the environment in the past year, and how much respondents wanted them to help the natural environment in the next year. Several questions asked how important the issue of global warming was to respondents, how much they knew about it, how serious a problem it was, and how much could be done to prevent future global warming and reduce its effects. Additional topics addressed changing local and worldwide weather patterns, scientists' assessments of the environment and global warming, whether the federal government should require companies and individuals to take measures to reduce global warming, and what type of vehicle respondents drove. Demographic variables include sex, age, race, education level, religious preference, household income, political party affiliation, political philosophy, type of residential area (e.g., urban or rural), whether respondents had any children or grandchildren, and whether they considered themselves born-again or evangelical Christians.Cf: http://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR04658.v1
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