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ABC News Nukes Poll, August 2005 [electronic resource]

ABC News
Format
Computer Resource; Online
Published
Ann Arbor, Mich. Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor] 2006
Edition
2006-11-13
Series
ICPSR
ABC News/Washington Post Poll Series
ICPSR (Series)
Access Restriction
AVAILABLE. This study is freely available to ICPSR member institutions.
Abstract
This special topic poll, undertaken August 18-21, 2005, queried respondents on their opinions about the possibilities of a terrorist attack. Respondents were asked if they felt the country was safer today than before September 11, 2001, if the United States was doing all it could to prevent another terrorist attack, how concerned they were about the possibility of another attack and if they might personally become a victim. The survey sought information on how prepared respondents felt for an attack, if they had emergency supplies on hand, and if they had an emergency plan in place. Respondents were also asked how they felt people would react to various types of attacks, how they would react to a nuclear bomb, if they felt nuclear and radiological materials were being protected, and how prepared they thought the government, law enforcement, and hospitals were for an attack. The survey also contained questions regarding respondents' driving habits, what type of vehicle they drove, their opinions of gas prices, whether or not their driving habits were being affected by the gas prices, and their opinions on the impact of gas prices on the national economy. Demographic information included party affiliation, political ideology, education, age, number of children under 18, type of residential area, race, income, and sex.Cf: http://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR04516.v1
Contents
Dataset
Description
Mode of access: Intranet.
Notes
Title from ICPSR DDI metadata of 2016-02-11.
Series Statement
ICPSR 4516
ICPSR (Series) 4516
Other Forms
Also available as downloadable files.
Copyright Not EvaluatedCopyright Not Evaluated
Technical Details
  • Staff View

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    a| This special topic poll, undertaken August 18-21, 2005, queried respondents on their opinions about the possibilities of a terrorist attack. Respondents were asked if they felt the country was safer today than before September 11, 2001, if the United States was doing all it could to prevent another terrorist attack, how concerned they were about the possibility of another attack and if they might personally become a victim. The survey sought information on how prepared respondents felt for an attack, if they had emergency supplies on hand, and if they had an emergency plan in place. Respondents were also asked how they felt people would react to various types of attacks, how they would react to a nuclear bomb, if they felt nuclear and radiological materials were being protected, and how prepared they thought the government, law enforcement, and hospitals were for an attack. The survey also contained questions regarding respondents' driving habits, what type of vehicle they drove, their opinions of gas prices, whether or not their driving habits were being affected by the gas prices, and their opinions on the impact of gas prices on the national economy. Demographic information included party affiliation, political ideology, education, age, number of children under 18, type of residential area, race, income, and sex.Cf: http://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR04516.v1
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