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CBS News Olympic Bombing/Terrorism Poll, July 1996 [electronic resource]

CBS News
Format
Computer Resource; Online
Published
Ann Arbor, Mich. Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor] 2008
Edition
2008-07-16
Series
ICPSR
CBS News/New York Times Poll Series
ICPSR (Series)
Access Restriction
AVAILABLE. This study is freely available to ICPSR member institutions.
Abstract
This poll, fielded July 29, 1996, is part of a continuing series of monthly surveys that solicit public opinion on the presidency and on a range of other political and social issues. Respondents were asked to give their opinions of President Bill Clinton and his handling of the bombing at the Olympic Games in Atlanta and the crash of TWA flight 800. They were also queried on whether they thought that these two events would affect their travel plans or attendance to public events. A number of questions dealt with issues pertaining to terrorism. Respondents were asked if they thought there would be more terrorist attacks in the coming year or if the Olympic bombing was a random act. They were also asked whether they thought it would be okay for the federal government to have more authority and plant undercover agents in possible terrorist groups. They were also asked they thought it would be okay for the government to use wiretaps to fight terrorism. A few questions dealt with security checkpoints at public events and buildings. Respondents were asked if they would favor more security checkpoints with guards and metal detectors at public events even if it would increase the cost of going to the event. They were also asked if they favored the increase in security at public events even if it increased the time waiting in line. They were also asked whether they would be willing to go through metal detectors at local malls and have their car inspected in order to park in a public garage. Respondents were queried on how much confidence they had that their own community was safe from terrorism along with how safe they thought the upcoming Republican and Democratic political conventions were from terrorism. They were also queried on whether they thought that it was possible to make the United States completely safe from terrorist bombings. Demographic variable include sex, age, race, education level, household income, religious affiliation, political ideology, party affiliation, children in household, and whether respondents had a child enter the ninth grade starting in the fallCf: http://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR04511.v1
Contents
Dataset
Description
Mode of access: Intranet.
Notes
Title from ICPSR DDI metadata of 2016-02-11.
Series Statement
ICPSR 4511
ICPSR (Series) 4511
Other Forms
Also available as downloadable files.
Copyright Not EvaluatedCopyright Not Evaluated
Technical Details
  • Staff View

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