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British Social Attitudes Survey, 2001 [electronic resource]

National Centre for Social Research
Format
Computer Resource; Online
Published
Ann Arbor, Mich. Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor] 2004
Edition
2006-01-18
Series
ICPSR
British Social Attitudes Survey Series
ICPSR (Series)
Access Restriction
AVAILABLE. This study is freely available to ICPSR member institutions.
Abstract
This survey is part of a continuing series designed to monitor trends in a wide range of social attitudes in Great Britain. The British Social Attitudes Survey (BSA) is similar in purpose to the General Social Survey carried out by the National Opinion Research Center (NORC) in the United States. The main BSA questionnaire (Part 1) has two parts, one administered by an interviewer and the other completed by the respondent. As in the past, the 2001 interview questionnaire contained a number of "core" questions covering the major topic areas of defense, the economy, labor market participation, and the welfare state. The 2001 self-enumerated questionnaire was devoted to a series of questions on a range of social, economic, political, and moral issues. Topics covered are: (1) political attitudes, (2) public spending and welfare, (3) health care, (4) health and safety in the workplace, (5) national identity, (6) education, (7) drugs, and (8) transport. An international initiative funded by the Nuffield Foundation, the International Social Survey Program (ISSP), also contributed a module to the BSA. The topic of the ISSP module in this collection was social networks. Additional demographic data gathered included age, gender, education, occupation, household income, marital status, social class, and religious and political affiliations. The 2001 survey also produced a second data file containing information on socio-economic classifications. With the 2001 census, National Statistics changed their coding scheme of occupations from SOC90 to SOC2000. In order to assess how consistent the new coding scheme was with the old one, one third of the 2001 BSA sample (version C) was coded using both the SOC90 and the SOC2000 schemes. Part 2 of this collection contains the variables from this experiment.Cf: http://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR03900.v1
Contents
  • Main Data
  • Socio-economic Classifications Data
Description
Mode of access: Intranet.
Notes
Title from ICPSR DDI metadata of 2016-02-11.
Series Statement
ICPSR 3900
ICPSR (Series) 3900
Other Forms
Also available as downloadable files.
Copyright Not EvaluatedCopyright Not Evaluated
Technical Details
  • Staff View

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    a| British Social Attitudes Survey, 2001 h| [electronic resource] c| National Centre for Social Research
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    a| 2006-01-18
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    a| Ann Arbor, Mich. b| Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor] c| 2004
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    a| British Social Attitudes Survey Series
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    a| Mode of access: Intranet.
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    a| Title from ICPSR DDI metadata of 2016-02-11.
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    a| AVAILABLE. This study is freely available to ICPSR member institutions.
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    a| This survey is part of a continuing series designed to monitor trends in a wide range of social attitudes in Great Britain. The British Social Attitudes Survey (BSA) is similar in purpose to the General Social Survey carried out by the National Opinion Research Center (NORC) in the United States. The main BSA questionnaire (Part 1) has two parts, one administered by an interviewer and the other completed by the respondent. As in the past, the 2001 interview questionnaire contained a number of "core" questions covering the major topic areas of defense, the economy, labor market participation, and the welfare state. The 2001 self-enumerated questionnaire was devoted to a series of questions on a range of social, economic, political, and moral issues. Topics covered are: (1) political attitudes, (2) public spending and welfare, (3) health care, (4) health and safety in the workplace, (5) national identity, (6) education, (7) drugs, and (8) transport. An international initiative funded by the Nuffield Foundation, the International Social Survey Program (ISSP), also contributed a module to the BSA. The topic of the ISSP module in this collection was social networks. Additional demographic data gathered included age, gender, education, occupation, household income, marital status, social class, and religious and political affiliations. The 2001 survey also produced a second data file containing information on socio-economic classifications. With the 2001 census, National Statistics changed their coding scheme of occupations from SOC90 to SOC2000. In order to assess how consistent the new coding scheme was with the old one, one third of the 2001 BSA sample (version C) was coded using both the SOC90 and the SOC2000 schemes. Part 2 of this collection contains the variables from this experiment.Cf: http://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR03900.v1
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    t| Socio-economic Classifications Data
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    a| drugs 2| icpsr
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    a| political parties 2| icpsr
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    a| religious denominations 2| icpsr
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    a| IDRC VI. Human Dimension of International Relations
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    a| IDRC II. Economic Data
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    a| ICPSR XVI.B. Social Indicators, Nations Other Than the United States
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    a| IDRC VII. Public Opinion Data
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    a| IDRC III. Electoral Systems and Political Behavior
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    a| National Centre for Social Research
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    a| Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research.
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    a| ICPSR (Series) v| 3900
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