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ABC News Poll, September 1994 [electronic resource]

ABC News
Format
Computer Resource; Online
Published
Ann Arbor, Mich. Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor] 2004
Edition
2006-11-30
Series
ICPSR
ABC News/Washington Post Poll Series
ICPSR (Series)
Access Restriction
AVAILABLE. This study is freely available to ICPSR member institutions.
Abstract
This poll is part of a continuing series of monthly surveys that solicit public opinion on the presidency and on a range of other political and social issues. Questions included the respondent's opinion on what the most important problem facing the United States was and approval ratings for President Clinton's handling of the presidency, the economy, foreign affairs, crime, and health care. Approval ratings were also tallied for the United States Congress and the Democrats and Republicans in Congress. Respondents were asked how much Congress had accomplished in the past year compared to years before and who was responsible (i.e., President Clinton or the parties in Congress). Respondents were asked if they believed certain political figures, including President Clinton, Senate Majority Leader Bob Dole, and the respondent's representative in Congress, were doing what was best for the country, their district, or their own political lives. Those polled were asked what they believed their representative in Congress should or should not be doing, and which political party was better at handling issues such as the economy and helping the middle class. Queries included the general functioning of the federal government and what, if any, changes were needed. Respondent opinions on the crime bill were gathered, as well as approval ratings on Congress's handling of the health care system. Other questions concerning health care included whether the respondent supported proposed changes to the health care system and whether the respondent believed that significant improvements would be made to the health care system. Respondents were also queried on what changes they would like to see in Congress -- for example, whether they would vote for their incumbent representative or the challenger. Respondents were asked if they believed that America's vital interests were at stake in the situation in Cuba and/or in Haiti and whether the United States should end its economic embargo against Cuba if certain conditions were met. Questions also solicited respondent views on whether they would support a military invasion of Haiti and if they believed that the United States would go to war with Haiti. Respondents' knowledge of bills passed in Congress within the past year was also assessed. Demographic information gathered includes political affiliation, voter registration status, voting record, political philosophy, level of education, religious preference, urban or rural residence, marital status, labor union status, working status, ethnicity, age, sex, yearly income, and willingness for call-back.Cf: http://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR03854.v1
Contents
Dataset
Description
Mode of access: Intranet.
Notes
Title from ICPSR DDI metadata of 2016-02-11.
Series Statement
ICPSR 3854
ICPSR (Series) 3854
Other Forms
Also available as downloadable files.
Copyright Not EvaluatedCopyright Not Evaluated
Technical Details
  • Staff View

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