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Washington Post Prince George's County Poll, July 1994 [electronic resource]

The Washington Post
Format
Computer Resource; Online
Published
Ann Arbor, Mich. Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor] 2005
Edition
2005-01-19
Series
ICPSR
ABC News/Washington Post Poll Series
ICPSR (Series)
Access Restriction
AVAILABLE. This study is freely available to ICPSR member institutions.
Abstract
This special topic poll, conducted July 15-20, 1994, was undertaken to assess respondents' views on the state of affairs in Prince George's County, Maryland, and its upcoming county elections. Residents were polled on the biggest problems facing the county, whether things were going in the right or wrong direction, the quality of the public schools, whether the budget for public schools should be increased, decreased or maintained, and whether respondents would favor or oppose a tax increase if the money benefited the county's public schools. Views were sought on the quality of life in Prince George's County and whether it had improved, worsened, or stayed the same in the past ten years, whether respondents expected it to improve in the next ten years, what they liked the most and the least about living there, whether they would rather live somewhere else in the Washington area, and if so, where. Respondents were asked about the status of race relations in Prince George's County, whether it was improving, worsening, or staying the same, and how important it was that most people in their neighborhood shared their racial background. Questions regarding the Black and White populations of Prince George's County asked whether each group had too much, too little, or the right amount of influence in county politics, whether this influence was changing, and whether it would be better for the county if the population of these groups increased, decreased, or stayed the same. Residents were polled on the likelihood that they would vote in the upcoming Democratic primary election, their opinions of the candidates for county executive (Wayne Curry, Sue V. Mills, Artie Polk, and Beatrice Tignor), which candidate they would vote for, how strongly they supported him or her, how often they trusted county government to do what was right, and how important it was that the next county executive, school superintendent, or police chief elected was Black. Respondents also gave their impressions of Maryland gubernatorial candidate Parris Glendening, county attorney Robert Ostrom, and council member Richard Castaldi. Background variables include sex, age, education, religion, ethnicity, marital status, household income, number of children in household, political orientation, political party affiliation, voter registration and participation history, length of residency in Prince George's County, and previous residence.Cf: http://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR03849.v1
Contents
Dataset
Description
Mode of access: Intranet.
Notes
Title from ICPSR DDI metadata of 2016-02-11.
Series Statement
ICPSR 3849
ICPSR (Series) 3849
Other Forms
Also available as downloadable files.
Copyright Not EvaluatedCopyright Not Evaluated
Technical Details
  • Staff View

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    a| This special topic poll, conducted July 15-20, 1994, was undertaken to assess respondents' views on the state of affairs in Prince George's County, Maryland, and its upcoming county elections. Residents were polled on the biggest problems facing the county, whether things were going in the right or wrong direction, the quality of the public schools, whether the budget for public schools should be increased, decreased or maintained, and whether respondents would favor or oppose a tax increase if the money benefited the county's public schools. Views were sought on the quality of life in Prince George's County and whether it had improved, worsened, or stayed the same in the past ten years, whether respondents expected it to improve in the next ten years, what they liked the most and the least about living there, whether they would rather live somewhere else in the Washington area, and if so, where. Respondents were asked about the status of race relations in Prince George's County, whether it was improving, worsening, or staying the same, and how important it was that most people in their neighborhood shared their racial background. Questions regarding the Black and White populations of Prince George's County asked whether each group had too much, too little, or the right amount of influence in county politics, whether this influence was changing, and whether it would be better for the county if the population of these groups increased, decreased, or stayed the same. Residents were polled on the likelihood that they would vote in the upcoming Democratic primary election, their opinions of the candidates for county executive (Wayne Curry, Sue V. Mills, Artie Polk, and Beatrice Tignor), which candidate they would vote for, how strongly they supported him or her, how often they trusted county government to do what was right, and how important it was that the next county executive, school superintendent, or police chief elected was Black. Respondents also gave their impressions of Maryland gubernatorial candidate Parris Glendening, county attorney Robert Ostrom, and council member Richard Castaldi. Background variables include sex, age, education, religion, ethnicity, marital status, household income, number of children in household, political orientation, political party affiliation, voter registration and participation history, length of residency in Prince George's County, and previous residence.Cf: http://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR03849.v1
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