Item Details

Print View

Unintended Impacts of Sentencing Reforms and Incarceration on Family Structure in the United States, 1984-1998 [electronic resource]

Samuel L. Jr. Myers
Format
Computer Resource; Online
Published
Ann Arbor, Mich. Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor] 2003
Edition
2006-03-30
Series
ICPSR
ICPSR (Series)
Access Restriction
AVAILABLE. This study is freely available to the general public.
Abstract
This project sought to investigate a possible relationship between sentencing guidelines and family structure in the United States. The research team developed three research modules that employed a variety of data sources and approaches to understand family destabilization and community distress, which cannot be observed directly. These three research modules were used to discover causal relationships between male withdrawal from productive spheres of the economy and resulting changes in the community and families. The research modules approached the issue of sentencing guidelines and family structure by studying: (1) the flow of inmates into prison (Module A), (2) the role of and issues related to sentencing reform (Module B), and family disruption in a single state (Module C). Module A utilized the Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) Program data for 1984 and 1993 (Parts 1 and 2), the 1984 and 1993 National Correctional Reporting Program (NCRP) data (Parts 3-6), the Urban Institute's 1980 and 1990 Underclass Database (UDB) (Part 7), the 1985 and 1994 National Longitudinal Survey on Youth (NLSY) (Parts 8 and 9), and county population, social, and economic data from the Current Population Survey, County Business Patterns, and United States Vital Statistics (Parts 10-12). The focus of this module was the relationship between family instability, as measured by female-headed families, and three societal characteristics, namely underclass measures in county of residence, individual characteristics, and flows of inmates. Module B examined the effects of statewide incarceration and sentencing changes on marriage markets and family structure. Module B utilized data from the Current Population Survey for 1985 and 1994 (Part 12) and the United States Statistical Abstracts (Part 13), as well as state-level data (Parts 14 and 15) to measure the Darity-Myers sex ratio and expected welfare income. The relationship between these two factors and family structure, sentencing guidelines, and minimum sentences for drug-related crimes was then measured. Module C used data collected from inmates entering the Minnesota prison system in 1997 and 1998 (Part 16), information from the 1990 Census (Part 17), and the Minnesota Crime Survey (Part 18) to assess any connections between incarceration and family structure. Module C focused on a single state with sentencing guidelines with the goal of understanding how sentencing reforms and the impacts of the local community factors affect inmate family structure. The researchers wanted to know if the aspects of locations that lose marriageable males to prison were more important than individual inmate characteristics with respect to the probability that someone will be imprisoned and leave behind dependent children. Variables in Parts 1 and 2 document arrests by race for arson, assault, auto theft, burglary, drugs, homicide, larceny, manslaughter, rape, robbery, sexual assault, and weapons. Variables in Parts 3 and 4 document prison admissions, while variables in Parts 5 and 6 document prison releases. Variables in Part 7 include the number of households on public assistance, education and income levels of residents by race, labor force participation by race, unemployment by race, percentage of population of different races, poverty rate by race, men in the military by race, and marriage pool by race. Variables in Parts 8 and 9 include age, county, education, employment status, family income, marital status, race, residence type, sex, and state. Part 10 provides county population data. Part 11 contains two different state identifiers. Variables in Part 12 describe mortality data and welfare data. Part 13 contains data from the United States Statistical Abstracts, including welfare and poverty variables. Variables in Parts 14 and 15 include number of children, age, education, family type, gender, head of household, marital status, race, religion, and state. Variables in Part 16 cover admission date, admission type, age, county, education, language, length of sentence, marital status, military status, sentence, sex, state, and ZIP code. Part 17 contains demographic data by Minnesota ZIP code, such as age categories, race, divorces, number of children, home ownership, and unemployment. Part 18 includes Minnesota crime data as well as some demographic variables, such as race, education, and poverty ratio.Cf: http://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR03662.v1
Contents
  • Module A: 1984 Age, Sex, Race Arrest Data
  • Module A: 1993 Age, Sex, Race Arrest Data
  • Module A: 1984 Prison Admissions Data
  • Module A: 1993 Prison Admissions Data
  • Module A: 1984 Prison Releases Data
  • Module A: 1993 Prison Releases Data
  • Module A: County Social and Economic Data
  • Module A: 1985 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth Data
  • Module A: 1994 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth Data
  • Module A: County Population Data
  • Module A: State Identifiers Data
  • Modules A and B: State-Level Population, Business, and Vital Statistics Data
  • Module B: Statistical Abstract Data
  • Module B: 1985 State-Level Data
  • Module B: 1995 State-Level Data
  • Module C: Minnesota Department of Corrections Data
  • Module C: Minnesota ZIP Code Data
  • Module C: Minnesota Crime Data
Description
Mode of access: Intranet.
Notes
Title from ICPSR DDI metadata of 2016-02-11.
Series Statement
ICPSR 3662
ICPSR (Series) 3662
Other Forms
Also available as downloadable files.
Copyright Not EvaluatedCopyright Not Evaluated
Technical Details
  • Staff View

    LEADER 07580cmm a2200721la 4500
    001 ICPSR03662
    003 MiAaI
    006 m f a u
    007 cr mn mmmmuuuu
    008 160211s2003 miu f a eng d
    035
      
      
    a| (MiAaI)ICPSR03662
    040
      
      
    a| MiAaI c| MiAaI
    245
    0
    0
    a| Unintended Impacts of Sentencing Reforms and Incarceration on Family Structure in the United States, 1984-1998 h| [electronic resource] c| Samuel L. Jr. Myers
    250
      
      
    a| 2006-03-30
    260
      
      
    a| Ann Arbor, Mich. b| Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor] c| 2003
    490
      
      
    a| ICPSR v| 3662
    516
      
      
    a| Numeric
    538
      
      
    a| Mode of access: Intranet.
    500
      
      
    a| Title from ICPSR DDI metadata of 2016-02-11.
    536
      
      
    a| United States Department of Justice. Office of Justice Programs. National Institute of Justice c| 96-CE-VX-0015
    506
      
      
    a| AVAILABLE. This study is freely available to the general public.
    530
      
      
    a| Also available as downloadable files.
    522
      
      
    a| United States
    522
      
      
    a| Minnesota
    520
    3
      
    a| This project sought to investigate a possible relationship between sentencing guidelines and family structure in the United States. The research team developed three research modules that employed a variety of data sources and approaches to understand family destabilization and community distress, which cannot be observed directly. These three research modules were used to discover causal relationships between male withdrawal from productive spheres of the economy and resulting changes in the community and families. The research modules approached the issue of sentencing guidelines and family structure by studying: (1) the flow of inmates into prison (Module A), (2) the role of and issues related to sentencing reform (Module B), and family disruption in a single state (Module C). Module A utilized the Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) Program data for 1984 and 1993 (Parts 1 and 2), the 1984 and 1993 National Correctional Reporting Program (NCRP) data (Parts 3-6), the Urban Institute's 1980 and 1990 Underclass Database (UDB) (Part 7), the 1985 and 1994 National Longitudinal Survey on Youth (NLSY) (Parts 8 and 9), and county population, social, and economic data from the Current Population Survey, County Business Patterns, and United States Vital Statistics (Parts 10-12). The focus of this module was the relationship between family instability, as measured by female-headed families, and three societal characteristics, namely underclass measures in county of residence, individual characteristics, and flows of inmates. Module B examined the effects of statewide incarceration and sentencing changes on marriage markets and family structure. Module B utilized data from the Current Population Survey for 1985 and 1994 (Part 12) and the United States Statistical Abstracts (Part 13), as well as state-level data (Parts 14 and 15) to measure the Darity-Myers sex ratio and expected welfare income. The relationship between these two factors and family structure, sentencing guidelines, and minimum sentences for drug-related crimes was then measured. Module C used data collected from inmates entering the Minnesota prison system in 1997 and 1998 (Part 16), information from the 1990 Census (Part 17), and the Minnesota Crime Survey (Part 18) to assess any connections between incarceration and family structure. Module C focused on a single state with sentencing guidelines with the goal of understanding how sentencing reforms and the impacts of the local community factors affect inmate family structure. The researchers wanted to know if the aspects of locations that lose marriageable males to prison were more important than individual inmate characteristics with respect to the probability that someone will be imprisoned and leave behind dependent children. Variables in Parts 1 and 2 document arrests by race for arson, assault, auto theft, burglary, drugs, homicide, larceny, manslaughter, rape, robbery, sexual assault, and weapons. Variables in Parts 3 and 4 document prison admissions, while variables in Parts 5 and 6 document prison releases. Variables in Part 7 include the number of households on public assistance, education and income levels of residents by race, labor force participation by race, unemployment by race, percentage of population of different races, poverty rate by race, men in the military by race, and marriage pool by race. Variables in Parts 8 and 9 include age, county, education, employment status, family income, marital status, race, residence type, sex, and state. Part 10 provides county population data. Part 11 contains two different state identifiers. Variables in Part 12 describe mortality data and welfare data. Part 13 contains data from the United States Statistical Abstracts, including welfare and poverty variables. Variables in Parts 14 and 15 include number of children, age, education, family type, gender, head of household, marital status, race, religion, and state. Variables in Part 16 cover admission date, admission type, age, county, education, language, length of sentence, marital status, military status, sentence, sex, state, and ZIP code. Part 17 contains demographic data by Minnesota ZIP code, such as age categories, race, divorces, number of children, home ownership, and unemployment. Part 18 includes Minnesota crime data as well as some demographic variables, such as race, education, and poverty ratio.Cf: http://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR03662.v1
    505
      
      
    t| Module A: 1984 Age, Sex, Race Arrest Data
    505
      
      
    t| Module A: 1993 Age, Sex, Race Arrest Data
    505
      
      
    t| Module A: 1984 Prison Admissions Data
    505
      
      
    t| Module A: 1993 Prison Admissions Data
    505
      
      
    t| Module A: 1984 Prison Releases Data
    505
      
      
    t| Module A: 1993 Prison Releases Data
    505
      
      
    t| Module A: County Social and Economic Data
    505
      
      
    t| Module A: 1985 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth Data
    505
      
      
    t| Module A: 1994 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth Data
    505
      
      
    t| Module A: County Population Data
    505
      
      
    t| Module A: State Identifiers Data
    505
      
      
    t| Modules A and B: State-Level Population, Business, and Vital Statistics Data
    505
      
      
    t| Module B: Statistical Abstract Data
    505
      
      
    t| Module B: 1985 State-Level Data
    505
      
      
    t| Module B: 1995 State-Level Data
    505
      
      
    t| Module C: Minnesota Department of Corrections Data
    505
      
      
    t| Module C: Minnesota ZIP Code Data
    505
      
      
    t| Module C: Minnesota Crime Data
    567
      
      
    a| Families and prisoners in United States (Modules A and B) and in the state of Minnesota (Module C).
    650
      
    7
    a| communities 2| icpsr
    650
      
    7
    a| demographic characteristics 2| icpsr
    650
      
    7
    a| families 2| icpsr
    650
      
    7
    a| family conflict 2| icpsr
    650
      
    7
    a| family structure 2| icpsr
    650
      
    7
    a| imprisonment 2| icpsr
    650
      
    7
    a| inmates 2| icpsr
    650
      
    7
    a| sentencing 2| icpsr
    650
      
    7
    a| sentencing guidelines 2| icpsr
    650
      
    7
    a| sentencing reform 2| icpsr
    650
      
    7
    a| single parent families 2| icpsr
    650
      
    7
    a| social problems 2| icpsr
    653
    0
      
    a| ICPSR XVII.E. Social Institutions and Behavior, Crime and the Criminal Justice System
    653
    0
      
    a| RCMD I. Crime
    653
    0
      
    a| NACJD III. Corrections
    700
    2
      
    a| Myers, Samuel L. Jr. u| University of Minnesota, Hubert H. Humphrey Institute of Public Affairs
    710
    2
      
    a| Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research.
    830
      
    0
    a| ICPSR (Series) v| 3662
    856
    4
    0
    u| http://proxy.its.virginia.edu/login?url=http://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR03662.v1
    999
      
      
    w| WEB l| INTERNET m| UVA-LIB t| INTERNET
▾See more
▴See less

Availability

Access Online