Item Details

Print View

ABC News September 11th Teen Poll, August 2002 [electronic resource]

ABC News
Format
Computer Resource; Online
Published
Ann Arbor, Mich. Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor] 2002
Edition
2005-12-15
Series
ICPSR
ABC News/Washington Post Poll Series
ICPSR (Series)
Access Restriction
AVAILABLE. This study is freely available to ICPSR member institutions.
Abstract
This special topic poll, conducted August 25-28, 2002, was undertaken to assess opinions of teens about the September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks. Teens were asked whether they were optimistic or pessimistic about the future of the country, whether they were optimistic or pessimistic about their personal future, how proud they were to be an American, what they planned to do after high school, how involved they felt their parents or guardians were in their lives, how much stress they had in their lives, whether they felt depressed, and how safe they felt in their day-to-day lives. They were also asked how safe they would feel flying in an airplane, being in a tall building, being in a big city, or being in a crowded place. Other survey questions queried the teen respondents about how often they thought about the terrorist attacks that took place in New York and Washington, DC, on September 11, 2001, whether their lives had changed since then, and whether they had made any changes in their personal plans for the future because of the attacks. Respondents were also asked if their parents had made any new rules about where they were allowed to go, whether they had to check in with their parents, whether they felt they knew how their parents felt about what happened September 11, 2001, and whether they felt the same way about the attacks as their parents. Teens were also asked if, right after the attacks, they had felt frightened about what happened, scared that there might be more terrorist attacks, worried about their own personal safety, worried about the safety of any friends or relatives, confused about who would do this and why, angry at the people who had perpetrated the attacks, or confident that the United States would handle the problem, and whether they continued to feel those things now. Additional questions probed for whether they had trouble sleeping right after the attacks or trouble now, whether they felt they had a good basic understanding of Islam, and whether they had heard any other kids or adults say prejudiced things about Muslims, Arabs, or Arab-Americans. Background information on respondents includes age, gender, education, and whether they lived in a large city, suburb, small town, or rural area.Cf: http://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR03561.v1
Contents
Dataset
Description
Mode of access: Intranet.
Notes
Title from ICPSR DDI metadata of 2016-02-11.
Series Statement
ICPSR 3561
ICPSR (Series) 3561
Other Forms
Also available as downloadable files.
Copyright Not EvaluatedCopyright Not Evaluated
Technical Details
  • Staff View

    LEADER 04310cmm a2200541la 4500
    001 ICPSR03561
    003 MiAaI
    006 m f a u
    007 cr mn mmmmuuuu
    008 160211s2002 miu f a eng d
    035
      
      
    a| (MiAaI)ICPSR03561
    040
      
      
    a| MiAaI c| MiAaI
    245
    0
    0
    a| ABC News September 11th Teen Poll, August 2002 h| [electronic resource] c| ABC News
    250
      
      
    a| 2005-12-15
    260
      
      
    a| Ann Arbor, Mich. b| Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor] c| 2002
    490
      
      
    a| ICPSR v| 3561
    490
      
      
    a| ABC News/Washington Post Poll Series
    516
      
      
    a| Numeric
    538
      
      
    a| Mode of access: Intranet.
    500
      
      
    a| Title from ICPSR DDI metadata of 2016-02-11.
    506
      
      
    a| AVAILABLE. This study is freely available to ICPSR member institutions.
    530
      
      
    a| Also available as downloadable files.
    522
      
      
    a| United States
    520
    3
      
    a| This special topic poll, conducted August 25-28, 2002, was undertaken to assess opinions of teens about the September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks. Teens were asked whether they were optimistic or pessimistic about the future of the country, whether they were optimistic or pessimistic about their personal future, how proud they were to be an American, what they planned to do after high school, how involved they felt their parents or guardians were in their lives, how much stress they had in their lives, whether they felt depressed, and how safe they felt in their day-to-day lives. They were also asked how safe they would feel flying in an airplane, being in a tall building, being in a big city, or being in a crowded place. Other survey questions queried the teen respondents about how often they thought about the terrorist attacks that took place in New York and Washington, DC, on September 11, 2001, whether their lives had changed since then, and whether they had made any changes in their personal plans for the future because of the attacks. Respondents were also asked if their parents had made any new rules about where they were allowed to go, whether they had to check in with their parents, whether they felt they knew how their parents felt about what happened September 11, 2001, and whether they felt the same way about the attacks as their parents. Teens were also asked if, right after the attacks, they had felt frightened about what happened, scared that there might be more terrorist attacks, worried about their own personal safety, worried about the safety of any friends or relatives, confused about who would do this and why, angry at the people who had perpetrated the attacks, or confident that the United States would handle the problem, and whether they continued to feel those things now. Additional questions probed for whether they had trouble sleeping right after the attacks or trouble now, whether they felt they had a good basic understanding of Islam, and whether they had heard any other kids or adults say prejudiced things about Muslims, Arabs, or Arab-Americans. Background information on respondents includes age, gender, education, and whether they lived in a large city, suburb, small town, or rural area.Cf: http://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR03561.v1
    505
      
      
    t| Dataset
    567
      
      
    a| Persons aged 12-17 living in households with telephones in the contiguous 48 states.
    650
      
    7
    a| airport security 2| icpsr
    650
      
    7
    a| al Qaeda 2| icpsr
    650
      
    7
    a| anxiety 2| icpsr
    650
      
    7
    a| attitudes 2| icpsr
    650
      
    7
    a| bin Laden, Osama 2| icpsr
    650
      
    7
    a| discrimination 2| icpsr
    650
      
    7
    a| fear 2| icpsr
    650
      
    7
    a| opinion polls 2| icpsr
    650
      
    7
    a| patriotism 2| icpsr
    650
      
    7
    a| personal security 2| icpsr
    650
      
    7
    a| presidential performance 2| icpsr
    650
      
    7
    a| public opinion 2| icpsr
    650
      
    7
    a| September 11 attack 2| icpsr
    650
      
    7
    a| social issues 2| icpsr
    650
      
    7
    a| terrorism 2| icpsr
    650
      
    7
    a| terrorist attacks 2| icpsr
    653
    0
      
    a| TPDRC II. Terrorism and Preparedness Survey Archive (TaPSA)
    653
    0
      
    a| ICPSR XIV.C.1. Mass Political Behavior and Attitudes, Public Opinion on Political Matters, United States
    710
    2
      
    a| ABC News
    710
    2
      
    a| Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research.
    830
      
    0
    a| ICPSR (Series) v| 3561
    856
    4
    0
    u| http://proxy.its.virginia.edu/login?url=http://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR03561.v1
    999
      
      
    w| WEB l| INTERNET m| UVA-LIB t| INTERNET
▾See more
▴See less

Availability

Access Online