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Racial Attitudes in Fifteen American Cities, 1968 [electronic resource]

Angus Campbell, Howard Schuman
Format
Computer Resource; Online
Published
Ann Arbor, Mich. Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor] 1984
Edition
1997-11-13
Series
ICPSR
ICPSR (Series)
Access Restriction
AVAILABLE. This study is freely available to ICPSR member institutions.
Abstract
This study explores attitudes and perceptions related to urban problems and race relations in 15 northern cities of the United States (Baltimore, Boston, Brooklyn, Chicago, Cincinnati, Cleveland, Detroit, Gary, Milwaukee, Newark, Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, St. Louis, San Francisco, and Washington, DC). More specifically, it seeks to define the social and psychological characteristics and aspirations of the Black and White urban populations. Samples of Blacks and Whites were selected in each of the cities in early 1968. The study employed two questionnaire forms, one for Whites and one for Blacks, and two corresponding data files were generated. Attitudinal questions asked of the White and Black respondents measured their satisfaction with community services, their feelings about the effectiveness of government in solving urban problems, and their experience with police abuse. Additional questions about the respondent's familiarity with and participation in antipoverty programs were included. Other questions centered on the respondent's opinions about the 1967 riots: the main causes, the purpose, the major participating classes, and the effect of the riots on the Black cause. Respondents' interracial relationships, their attitudes toward integration, and their perceptions of the hostility between the races were also investigated. White respondents were asked about their opinions on the use of governmental intervention as a solution for various problems of the Blacks, such as substandard schools, unemployment, and unfair housing practices. Respondent's reactions to nonviolent and violent protests by Blacks, their acceptance of counter-rioting by Whites and their ideas concerning possible governmental action to prevent further rioting were elicited. Inquiries were made as to whether or not the respondent had given money to support or hinder the Black cause. Other items investigated respondents' perceptions of racial discrimination in jobs, education, and housing, and their reactions to working under or living next door to a Black person. Black respondents were asked about their perceptions of discrimination in hiring, promotion, and housing, and general attitudes toward themselves and towards Blacks in general. The survey also investigated respondents' past participation in civil rights organizations and in nonviolent and/or violent protests, their sympathy with rioters, and the likelihood of personal participation in a future riot. Other questions probed respondents' attitudes toward various civil rights leaders along with their concurrence with statements concerning the meaning of "Black power." Demographic variables include sex and age of the respondent, and the age and relationship to the respondent of each person in the household, as well as information about the number of persons in the household, their race, and the type of structure in which they lived. Additional demographic topics include the occupational and educational background of the respondent, of the respondent's family head, and of the respondent's father. The respondent's family income and the amount of that income earned by the head of the family were obtained, and it was determined if any of the family income came from welfare, Social Security, or veteran's benefits. This study also ascertained the place of birth of the respondent and respondent's mother and father, in order to measure the degree of southern influence. Other questions investigated the respondent's military background, religious preference, marital status, and family composition.Cf: http://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR03500.v2
Contents
  • Data File
  • White
  • Black
Description
Mode of access: Intranet.
Notes
Title from ICPSR DDI metadata of 2016-02-11.
Series Statement
ICPSR 3500
ICPSR (Series) 3500
Other Forms
Also available as downloadable files.
Copyright Not EvaluatedCopyright Not Evaluated
Technical Details
  • Staff View

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    a| Racial Attitudes in Fifteen American Cities, 1968 h| [electronic resource] c| Angus Campbell, Howard Schuman
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    a| 1997-11-13
    260
      
      
    a| Ann Arbor, Mich. b| Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor] c| 1984
    490
      
      
    a| ICPSR v| 3500
    516
      
      
    a| Numeric
    538
      
      
    a| Mode of access: Intranet.
    500
      
      
    a| Title from ICPSR DDI metadata of 2016-02-11.
    506
      
      
    a| AVAILABLE. This study is freely available to ICPSR member institutions.
    530
      
      
    a| Also available as downloadable files.
    522
      
      
    a| Baltimore
    522
      
      
    a| Boston
    522
      
      
    a| Brooklyn
    522
      
      
    a| California
    522
      
      
    a| Chicago
    522
      
      
    a| Cincinnati
    522
      
      
    a| Detroit
    522
      
      
    a| District of Columbia
    522
      
      
    a| Gary
    522
      
      
    a| Illinois
    522
      
      
    a| Indiana
    522
      
      
    a| Maryland
    522
      
      
    a| Massachusetts
    522
      
      
    a| Michigan
    522
      
      
    a| Milwaukee
    522
      
      
    a| Missouri
    522
      
      
    a| New Jersey
    522
      
      
    a| New York (state)
    522
      
      
    a| New York City
    522
      
      
    a| Newark
    522
      
      
    a| Ohio
    522
      
      
    a| Pennsylvania
    522
      
      
    a| Philadelphia
    522
      
      
    a| Pittsburgh
    522
      
      
    a| United States
    522
      
      
    a| Wisconsin
    520
    3
      
    a| This study explores attitudes and perceptions related to urban problems and race relations in 15 northern cities of the United States (Baltimore, Boston, Brooklyn, Chicago, Cincinnati, Cleveland, Detroit, Gary, Milwaukee, Newark, Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, St. Louis, San Francisco, and Washington, DC). More specifically, it seeks to define the social and psychological characteristics and aspirations of the Black and White urban populations. Samples of Blacks and Whites were selected in each of the cities in early 1968. The study employed two questionnaire forms, one for Whites and one for Blacks, and two corresponding data files were generated. Attitudinal questions asked of the White and Black respondents measured their satisfaction with community services, their feelings about the effectiveness of government in solving urban problems, and their experience with police abuse. Additional questions about the respondent's familiarity with and participation in antipoverty programs were included. Other questions centered on the respondent's opinions about the 1967 riots: the main causes, the purpose, the major participating classes, and the effect of the riots on the Black cause. Respondents' interracial relationships, their attitudes toward integration, and their perceptions of the hostility between the races were also investigated. White respondents were asked about their opinions on the use of governmental intervention as a solution for various problems of the Blacks, such as substandard schools, unemployment, and unfair housing practices. Respondent's reactions to nonviolent and violent protests by Blacks, their acceptance of counter-rioting by Whites and their ideas concerning possible governmental action to prevent further rioting were elicited. Inquiries were made as to whether or not the respondent had given money to support or hinder the Black cause. Other items investigated respondents' perceptions of racial discrimination in jobs, education, and housing, and their reactions to working under or living next door to a Black person. Black respondents were asked about their perceptions of discrimination in hiring, promotion, and housing, and general attitudes toward themselves and towards Blacks in general. The survey also investigated respondents' past participation in civil rights organizations and in nonviolent and/or violent protests, their sympathy with rioters, and the likelihood of personal participation in a future riot. Other questions probed respondents' attitudes toward various civil rights leaders along with their concurrence with statements concerning the meaning of "Black power." Demographic variables include sex and age of the respondent, and the age and relationship to the respondent of each person in the household, as well as information about the number of persons in the household, their race, and the type of structure in which they lived. Additional demographic topics include the occupational and educational background of the respondent, of the respondent's family head, and of the respondent's father. The respondent's family income and the amount of that income earned by the head of the family were obtained, and it was determined if any of the family income came from welfare, Social Security, or veteran's benefits. This study also ascertained the place of birth of the respondent and respondent's mother and father, in order to measure the degree of southern influence. Other questions investigated the respondent's military background, religious preference, marital status, and family composition.Cf: http://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR03500.v2
    505
      
      
    t| Data File -- White
    505
      
      
    t| Data File -- Black
    567
      
      
    a| Individuals between the ages of 16 and 69, living in private households within the 1960 corporate limits of the cities sampled (Baltimore, Boston, Brooklyn, Chicago, Cincinnati, Cleveland, Detroit, Gary, Milwaukee, Newark, Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, St. Louis, San Francisco, and Washington, DC). Persons with no place of residence, the institutional population, and persons in group quarters had no chance of selection for the study.
    650
      
    7
    a| African Americans 2| icpsr
    650
      
    7
    a| Black White relations 2| icpsr
    650
      
    7
    a| cities 2| icpsr
    650
      
    7
    a| discrimination 2| icpsr
    650
      
    7
    a| minority affairs 2| icpsr
    650
      
    7
    a| prejudice 2| icpsr
    650
      
    7
    a| race relations 2| icpsr
    650
      
    7
    a| racial attitudes 2| icpsr
    650
      
    7
    a| racial integration 2| icpsr
    650
      
    7
    a| racial tensions 2| icpsr
    650
      
    7
    a| urban areas 2| icpsr
    653
    0
      
    a| RCMD XIII. Race and Ethnicity
    653
    0
      
    a| RCMD XII. Public Opinion
    653
    0
      
    a| ICPSR XVII.A. Social Institutions and Behavior, Minorities and Race Relations
    700
    2
      
    a| Campbell, Angus
    700
    2
      
    a| Schuman, Howard
    710
    2
      
    a| Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research.
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    a| ICPSR (Series) v| 3500
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    u| http://proxy.its.virginia.edu/login?url=http://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR03500.v2
    999
      
      
    w| WEB l| INTERNET m| UVA-LIB t| INTERNET
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