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Project on Policing Neighborhoods in Indianapolis, Indiana, and St. Petersburg, Florida, 1996-1997 [electronic resource]

Stephen D. Mastrofski, Roger B. Parks, Robert E. Worden, Albert J. Jr. Reiss
Format
Computer Resource; Online
Published
Ann Arbor, Mich. Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor] 2002
Edition
2007-06-01
Series
ICPSR
ICPSR (Series)
Access Restriction
AVAILABLE. This study is freely available to the general public.
Abstract
The purpose of the Project on Policing Neighborhoods (POPN) was to provide an in-depth description of how the police and the community interact with each other in a community policing (CP) environment. Research was conducted in Indianapolis, Indiana, in 1996 and in St. Petersburg, Florida, in 1997. Several research methods were employed: systematic observation of patrol officers (Parts 1-4) and patrol supervisors (Parts 5-14), in-person interviews with patrol officers (Part 15) and supervisors (Parts 16-17), and telephone surveys of residents in selected neighborhoods (Part 18). Field researchers accompanied their assigned patrol or supervising officer during all activities and encounters with the public during the shift. Field researchers noted when various activities and encounters with the public occurred during these "ride-alongs," who was involved, and what happened. In the resulting data files coded observation data are provided at the ride level, the activity level (actions that did not involve interactions with citizens), the encounter level (events in which officers interacted with citizens), and the citizen level. In addition to encounters with citizens, supervisors also engaged in encounters with patrol officers. Patrol officers and patrol supervisors in both Indianapolis and St. Petersburg were interviewed one-on-one in a private interviewing room during their regular work shifts. Citizens in the POPN study beats were randomly selected for telephone surveys to determine their views about problems in their neighborhoods and other community issues. Administrative records were used to create site identification data (Part 19) and data on staffing (Part 20). This data collection also includes data compiled from census records, aggregated to the beat level for each site (Part 21). Census data were also used to produce district populations for both sites (Part 22). Citizen data were aggregated to the encounter level to produce counts of various citizen role categories and characteristics and characteristics of the encounter between the patrol officer and citizens in the various encounters (Part 23). Ride-level data (Parts 1, 5, and 10) contain information about characteristics of the ride, including start and end times, officer identification, type of unit, and beat assignment. Activity data (Parts 2, 6, and 11) include type of activity, where and when the activity took place, who was present, and how the officer was notified. Encounter data (Parts 3, 7, and 12) contain descriptive information on encounters similar to the activity data (i.e., location, initiation of encounter). Citizen data (Parts 4, 8, and 13) provide citizen characteristics, citizen behavior, and police behavior toward citizens. Similarly, officer data from the supervisor observations (Parts 9 and 14) include characteristics of the supervising officer and the nature of the interaction between the officers. Both the patrol officer and supervisor interview data (Parts 15-17) include the officers' demographics, training and knowledge, experience, perceptions of their beats and organizational environment, and beliefs about the police role. The patrol officer data also provide the officers' perceptions of their supervisors while the supervisor data describe supervisors' perceptions of their subordinates, as well as their views about their roles, power, and priorities as supervisors. Data from surveyed citizens (Part 18) provide information about their neighborhoods, including years in the neighborhood, distance to various places in the neighborhood, neighborhood problems and effectiveness of police response to those problems, citizen knowledge of, or interactions with, the police, satisfaction with police services, and friends and relatives in the neighborhood. Citizen demographics and geographic and weight variables are also included. Site identification variables (Part 19) include ride and encounter numbers, site beat (site, district, and beat or community policing areas [CPA]), and sector. Staffing variables (Part 20) include district, shift, and staffing levels for various shifts. Census data (Part 21) include neighborhood, index of socioeconomic distress, total population, and total white population. District population variables (Part 22) include district and population of district. The aggregated citizen data (Part 23) provide the ride and encounter numbers, number of citizens in the encounter, counts of citizens by their various roles, and by sex, age, race, wealth, if known by the police, under the influence of alcohol or drugs, physically injured, had a weapon, or assaulted the police, counts by type of encounter, and counts of police and citizen actions during the encounter.Cf: http://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR03160.v2
Contents
  • Indianapolis and St. Petersburg Patrol Ride Data
  • Indianapolis and St. Petersburg Patrol Activity Data
  • Indianapolis and St. Petersburg Patrol Encounter Data
  • Indianapolis and St. Petersburg Patrol Citizen Data
  • Indianapolis Supervisor Ride Data
  • Indianapolis Supervisor Activity Data
  • Indianapolis Supervisor Encounters With Citizens Data
  • Indianapolis Supervisor Citizen Data
  • Indianapolis Supervisor Encounters With Patrol Officers Data
  • St. Petersburg Supervisor Ride Data
  • St. Petersburg Supervisor Activity Data
  • St. Petersburg Supervisor Encounters With Citizens Data
  • St. Petersburg Supervisor Citizen Data
  • St. Petersburg Supervisor Encounters With Patrol Officers Data
  • Indianapolis and St. Petersburg Patrol Officer Interview Data
  • Indianapolis Supervisor Interview Data
  • St. Petersburg Supervisor Interview Data
  • Indianapolis and St. Petersburg Citizen Survey Data
  • Indianapolis and St. Petersburg Site Identification Data
  • Indianapolis and St. Petersburg Staffing Data
  • Indianapolis and St. Petersburg Census Data
  • Indianapolis and St. Petersburg District Population Data
  • Indianapolis and St. Petersburg Citizen Data From Patrol Data Aggregated to the Encounter Level
Description
Mode of access: Intranet.
Notes
Title from ICPSR DDI metadata of 2016-02-11.
Series Statement
ICPSR 3160
ICPSR (Series) 3160
Other Forms
Also available as downloadable files.
Copyright Not EvaluatedCopyright Not Evaluated
Technical Details
  • Staff View

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    a| Project on Policing Neighborhoods in Indianapolis, Indiana, and St. Petersburg, Florida, 1996-1997 h| [electronic resource] c| Stephen D. Mastrofski, Roger B. Parks, Robert E. Worden, Albert J. Jr. Reiss
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    a| Ann Arbor, Mich. b| Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor] c| 2002
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    a| The purpose of the Project on Policing Neighborhoods (POPN) was to provide an in-depth description of how the police and the community interact with each other in a community policing (CP) environment. Research was conducted in Indianapolis, Indiana, in 1996 and in St. Petersburg, Florida, in 1997. Several research methods were employed: systematic observation of patrol officers (Parts 1-4) and patrol supervisors (Parts 5-14), in-person interviews with patrol officers (Part 15) and supervisors (Parts 16-17), and telephone surveys of residents in selected neighborhoods (Part 18). Field researchers accompanied their assigned patrol or supervising officer during all activities and encounters with the public during the shift. Field researchers noted when various activities and encounters with the public occurred during these "ride-alongs," who was involved, and what happened. In the resulting data files coded observation data are provided at the ride level, the activity level (actions that did not involve interactions with citizens), the encounter level (events in which officers interacted with citizens), and the citizen level. In addition to encounters with citizens, supervisors also engaged in encounters with patrol officers. Patrol officers and patrol supervisors in both Indianapolis and St. Petersburg were interviewed one-on-one in a private interviewing room during their regular work shifts. Citizens in the POPN study beats were randomly selected for telephone surveys to determine their views about problems in their neighborhoods and other community issues. Administrative records were used to create site identification data (Part 19) and data on staffing (Part 20). This data collection also includes data compiled from census records, aggregated to the beat level for each site (Part 21). Census data were also used to produce district populations for both sites (Part 22). Citizen data were aggregated to the encounter level to produce counts of various citizen role categories and characteristics and characteristics of the encounter between the patrol officer and citizens in the various encounters (Part 23). Ride-level data (Parts 1, 5, and 10) contain information about characteristics of the ride, including start and end times, officer identification, type of unit, and beat assignment. Activity data (Parts 2, 6, and 11) include type of activity, where and when the activity took place, who was present, and how the officer was notified. Encounter data (Parts 3, 7, and 12) contain descriptive information on encounters similar to the activity data (i.e., location, initiation of encounter). Citizen data (Parts 4, 8, and 13) provide citizen characteristics, citizen behavior, and police behavior toward citizens. Similarly, officer data from the supervisor observations (Parts 9 and 14) include characteristics of the supervising officer and the nature of the interaction between the officers. Both the patrol officer and supervisor interview data (Parts 15-17) include the officers' demographics, training and knowledge, experience, perceptions of their beats and organizational environment, and beliefs about the police role. The patrol officer data also provide the officers' perceptions of their supervisors while the supervisor data describe supervisors' perceptions of their subordinates, as well as their views about their roles, power, and priorities as supervisors. Data from surveyed citizens (Part 18) provide information about their neighborhoods, including years in the neighborhood, distance to various places in the neighborhood, neighborhood problems and effectiveness of police response to those problems, citizen knowledge of, or interactions with, the police, satisfaction with police services, and friends and relatives in the neighborhood. Citizen demographics and geographic and weight variables are also included. Site identification variables (Part 19) include ride and encounter numbers, site beat (site, district, and beat or community policing areas [CPA]), and sector. Staffing variables (Part 20) include district, shift, and staffing levels for various shifts. Census data (Part 21) include neighborhood, index of socioeconomic distress, total population, and total white population. District population variables (Part 22) include district and population of district. The aggregated citizen data (Part 23) provide the ride and encounter numbers, number of citizens in the encounter, counts of citizens by their various roles, and by sex, age, race, wealth, if known by the police, under the influence of alcohol or drugs, physically injured, had a weapon, or assaulted the police, counts by type of encounter, and counts of police and citizen actions during the encounter.Cf: http://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR03160.v2
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    t| Indianapolis and St. Petersburg Patrol Ride Data
    505
      
      
    t| Indianapolis and St. Petersburg Patrol Activity Data
    505
      
      
    t| Indianapolis and St. Petersburg Patrol Encounter Data
    505
      
      
    t| Indianapolis and St. Petersburg Patrol Citizen Data
    505
      
      
    t| Indianapolis Supervisor Ride Data
    505
      
      
    t| Indianapolis Supervisor Activity Data
    505
      
      
    t| Indianapolis Supervisor Encounters With Citizens Data
    505
      
      
    t| Indianapolis Supervisor Citizen Data
    505
      
      
    t| Indianapolis Supervisor Encounters With Patrol Officers Data
    505
      
      
    t| St. Petersburg Supervisor Ride Data
    505
      
      
    t| St. Petersburg Supervisor Activity Data
    505
      
      
    t| St. Petersburg Supervisor Encounters With Citizens Data
    505
      
      
    t| St. Petersburg Supervisor Citizen Data
    505
      
      
    t| St. Petersburg Supervisor Encounters With Patrol Officers Data
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    t| Indianapolis and St. Petersburg Patrol Officer Interview Data
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    t| Indianapolis Supervisor Interview Data
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    t| St. Petersburg Supervisor Interview Data
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    t| Indianapolis and St. Petersburg Citizen Survey Data
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    t| Indianapolis and St. Petersburg Site Identification Data
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    t| Indianapolis and St. Petersburg Staffing Data
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    t| Indianapolis and St. Petersburg Census Data
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    a| All patrol and supervising law enforcement officers in the study areas of Indianapolis in 1996 and St. Petersburg in 1997.
    650
      
    7
    a| citizen attitudes 2| icpsr
    650
      
    7
    a| communities 2| icpsr
    650
      
    7
    a| community policing 2| icpsr
    650
      
    7
    a| neighborhood conditions 2| icpsr
    650
      
    7
    a| neighborhoods 2| icpsr
    650
      
    7
    a| perception of crime 2| icpsr
    650
      
    7
    a| police 2| icpsr
    650
      
    7
    a| police citizen interactions 2| icpsr
    650
      
    7
    a| police effectiveness 2| icpsr
    650
      
    7
    a| police patrol 2| icpsr
    653
    0
      
    a| NACJD IX. Police
    653
    0
      
    a| RCMD I. Crime
    653
    0
      
    a| ICPSR XVII.E. Social Institutions and Behavior, Crime and the Criminal Justice System
    700
    2
      
    a| Mastrofski, Stephen D. u| George Mason University
    700
    2
      
    a| Parks, Roger B. u| Indiana University
    700
    2
      
    a| Worden, Robert E. u| University at Albany
    700
    2
      
    a| Reiss, Albert J. Jr. u| Yale University
    710
    2
      
    a| Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research.
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    0
    a| ICPSR (Series) v| 3160
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