Item Details

State Legislative Survey and Contextual Data, 1995 [electronic resource]: United States

John M. Carey, Richard G. Niemi, Lynda W. Powell
Format
Computer Resource; Online; Dataset
Published
Ann Arbor, Mich. Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor] 2000
Edition
2000-12-08
Series
ICPSR
ICPSR (Series)
Access Restriction
AVAILABLE. This study is freely available to ICPSR member institutions.
Abstract
This survey of state legislators focused on attitudes toward term limits and what effects term limits might have. The survey was conducted just as term limits were about to be initiated in close to 20 states. Respondents were asked how many terms they had served, whether they supported the idea of term limits, and if they had taken a position on term limits during their campaigns. They were also asked about the relative influence of party leaders and staff, among others, in determining legislative outcomes and how this influence had changed recently. With regard to the job of legislator, respondents were queried regarding how many bills and amendments they had authored, how much time they spent on various duties and tasks, and if they specialized in single policy areas. Also elicited was campaign information regarding headquarters and staff, as well as information on opposition, vote percentages, and campaign expenditures. Additional questions regarding the respondent's political future were asked as well. Former state legislators also answered questions regarding which other offices they held, and whether they were appointed or elected to those positions. In addition, they were asked why they departed from the legislature, if they were likely to run for office again, what the political background of the person who held the seat after them was, and, if they chose not to run for re-election, the reason for that decision. Demographic information, including gender, year of birth, ethnicity, occupation outside of politics, income level, and religious affiliation was also collected. Contextual information was added to the file by the principal investigators, and includes data on state population, the date when term limits were adopted in the state, length of term, timing of elections, number of seats in the legislature, legislative expenditures, and legislator compensation.Cf: http://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR03021.v1
Contents
Dataset
Description
Mode of access: Intranet.
Notes
Title from ICPSR DDI metadata of 2016-02-11.
Series Statement
ICPSR 3021
ICPSR (Series) 3021
Other Forms
Also available as downloadable files.
Logo for Copyright Not EvaluatedCopyright Not Evaluated
Technical Details

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    a| State Legislative Survey and Contextual Data, 1995 h| [electronic resource] b| [United States] c| John M. Carey, Richard G. Niemi, Lynda W. Powell
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    a| 2000-12-08
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    a| Ann Arbor, Mich. b| Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor] c| 2000
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    a| ICPSR v| 3021
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    a| Numeric
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    a| Title from ICPSR DDI metadata of 2016-02-11.
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    a| National Science Foundation c| SBR-9422375
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    a| AVAILABLE. This study is freely available to ICPSR member institutions.
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    a| Also available as downloadable files.
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    a| United States
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    a| This survey of state legislators focused on attitudes toward term limits and what effects term limits might have. The survey was conducted just as term limits were about to be initiated in close to 20 states. Respondents were asked how many terms they had served, whether they supported the idea of term limits, and if they had taken a position on term limits during their campaigns. They were also asked about the relative influence of party leaders and staff, among others, in determining legislative outcomes and how this influence had changed recently. With regard to the job of legislator, respondents were queried regarding how many bills and amendments they had authored, how much time they spent on various duties and tasks, and if they specialized in single policy areas. Also elicited was campaign information regarding headquarters and staff, as well as information on opposition, vote percentages, and campaign expenditures. Additional questions regarding the respondent's political future were asked as well. Former state legislators also answered questions regarding which other offices they held, and whether they were appointed or elected to those positions. In addition, they were asked why they departed from the legislature, if they were likely to run for office again, what the political background of the person who held the seat after them was, and, if they chose not to run for re-election, the reason for that decision. Demographic information, including gender, year of birth, ethnicity, occupation outside of politics, income level, and religious affiliation was also collected. Contextual information was added to the file by the principal investigators, and includes data on state population, the date when term limits were adopted in the state, length of term, timing of elections, number of seats in the legislature, legislative expenditures, and legislator compensation.Cf: http://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR03021.v1
    505
      
      
    t| Dataset
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    a| All state legislators in all 50 states in spring 1995, as well as former legislators who served in 1993 or 1994.
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    a| elections 2| icpsr
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    a| political campaigns 2| icpsr
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    a| ICPSR XIII.B. Legislative and Deliberative Bodies, Studies of Decision-Making in Deliberative Bodies
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    a| Carey, John M.
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    a| Niemi, Richard G.
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    a| Powell, Lynda W.
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    a| Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research.
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Availability

Access Online