Item Details

Print View

Factors Related to Domestic Violence Court Dispositions in a Large Midwestern Urban Area, 1997-1998 [electronic resource]: United States

Joanne Belknap, Dee L.R. Graham
Format
Computer Resource; Online
Published
Ann Arbor, Mich. Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor] 2001
Edition
2006-03-30
Series
ICPSR
ICPSR (Series)
Access Restriction
AVAILABLE. This study is freely available to the general public.
Abstract
The goal of this study was to identify factors that influence whether city misdemeanor domestic violence cases in which batterers are arrested by police result in dismissals, acquittals, or convictions in the courts, and how these cases are processed. The researchers sought to examine factors that influence court officials' decision-making in domestic violence cases, as well as factors that influence victim and witness reluctance in bringing batterers to successful adjudication. In Part 1 researchers merged pretrial services data with information from police and prosecutors' reports in the urban area under study to answer the following questions: (1) What is the rate of dismissals, acquittals, and convictions for misdemeanor court cases and what are the conditions of these sentences? (2) What factors in court cases are significantly related to whether the disposition is a dismissal, acquittal, or conviction, and how are these cases processed? In Part 2, judges, prosecutors, and public defenders were asked detailed questions about their level of knowledge about, attitudes toward, and self-reported behaviors regarding the processing of domestic violence cases to find out: (1) What roles do legal and extra-legal factors play in decision-makers' self-reported behaviors and attitudes? (2) How do decision-makers rate victim advocate and batterer treatment programs? (3) How do court professionals view the victim's role in the court process? and (4) To what degree do court professionals report victim-blaming attitudes and experiences? For Part 3 researchers used a stratified random sample to select court cases of misdemeanor domestic violence that would be transcribed and used for a content analysis to examine: (1) Who speaks in court and how? and (2) What is considered relevant by different court players? In Parts 4-103 victim surveys and interviews were administered to learn about battered women's experiences in both their personal lives and the criminal processing system. Researchers sought to answer the following questions: (1) How do victim/witnesses perceive their role in the prosecution of their abusers? (2) What factors inhibit them from pursuing prosecution? (3) What factors might help them pursue prosecution? and (4) How consistent are the victims'/witnesses' demographic and psychological profiles with existing research in this area? Domestic violence victims attending arraignment between January 1 and December 31 of 1997 were asked to complete surveys to identify their concerns about testifying against their partners and to evaluate the effectiveness of the court system in dealing with domestic violence cases (Part 4). The disposition of each case was subsequently determined by a research team member's examination of defendants' case files and/or court computer files. Upon case closure victims who had both completed a survey and indicated a willingness to be interviewed were contacted to participate in an interview (Parts 5-103). Variables in Part 1, Pretrial Services Data, include prior criminal history, current charges, case disposition, sentence, victim testimony, police testimony, victim's demeanor at trial, judge's conduct, type of abuse involved, weapons used, injuries sustained, and type of evidence available for trial. Demographic variables include age, sex, and race of defendants, victims, prosecutors, and judges. In Part 2, Professional Survey Data, respondents were asked about their tolerance for victims and offenders who appeared in court more than once, actions taken when substance abuse was involved, the importance of injuries in making a decision, attitudes toward battered women, the role of victim advocates and the police, views on restraining orders, and opinion on whether arrest is a deterrent. Demographic variables include age, sex, race, marital status, and years of professional experience. Variables in Part 3, Court Transcript Data, include number and type of charges, pleas, reasons for dismissals, types of evidence submitted by prosecutors and defense, substance abuse by victim and defendant, living arrangements and number of children of victim and defendant, specific type of abuse, injuries sustained, witnesses to injuries, police testimony, verdict, and sentence. Demographic variables include age and sex of defendant and victim and relationship of victim and defendant. In Part 4, Victim Survey Data, victims were asked about their relationship and living arrangements with the defendant, concerns about testifying in court, desired outcomes of case and punishment for defendant, emotional issues related to abuse, health problems, substance abuse, support networks, other violent domestic incidents and injuries, and safety concerns. Part 5 variables measured victims' safety at different stages of the criminal justice process and danger experienced due to further violent incidents, presence of weapons, and threats of homicide or suicide. Parts 6-103 contain the qualitative interview data.Cf: http://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR03010.v1
Contents
  • Pretrial Services Data
  • Professional Survey Data
  • Court Transcript Data
  • Victim Survey Data
  • Victim Safety and Danger Scale Data
  • Victim Interview 1 Data
  • Victim Interview 2 Data
  • Victim Interview 3 Data
  • Victim Interview 4 Data
  • Victim Interview 5 Data
  • Victim Interview 6 Data
  • Victim Interview 7 Data
  • Victim Interview 8 Data
  • Victim Interview 9 Data
  • Victim Interview 10 Data
  • Victim Interview 11 Data
  • Victim Interview 12 Data
  • Victim Interview 13 Data
  • Victim Interview 14 Data
  • Victim Interview 15 Data
  • Victim Interview 16 Data
  • Victim Interview 17 Data
  • Victim Interview 18 Data
  • Victim Interview 19 Data
  • Victim Interview 20 Data
  • Victim Interview 21 Data
  • Victim Interview 22 Data
  • Victim Interview 23 Data
  • Victim Interview 24 Data
  • Victim Interview 25 Data
  • Victim Interview 26 Data
  • Victim Interview 27 Data
  • Victim Interview 28 Data
  • Victim Interview 29 Data
  • Victim Interview 30 Data
  • Victim Interview 31 Data
  • Victim Interview 32 Data
  • Victim Interview 33 Data
  • Victim Interview 34 Data
  • Victim Interview 35 Data
  • Victim Interview 36 Data
  • Victim Interview 37 Data
  • Victim Interview 38 Data
  • Victim Interview 39 Data
  • Victim Interview 40 Data
  • Victim Interview 41 Data
  • Victim Interview 42 Data
  • Victim Interview 43 Data
  • Victim Interview 44 Data
  • Victim Interview 45 Data
  • Victim Interview 46 Data
  • Victim Interview 47 Data
  • Victim Interview 48 Data
  • Victim Interview 49 Data
  • Victim Interview 50 Data
  • Victim Interview 51 Data
  • Victim Interview 52 Data
  • Victim Interview 53 Data
  • Victim Interview 54 Data
  • Victim Interview 55 Data
  • Victim Interview 56 Data
  • Victim Interview 57 Data
  • Victim Interview 58 Data
  • Victim Interview 59 Data
  • Victim Interview 60 Data
  • Victim Interview 61 Data
  • Victim Interview 62 Data
  • Victim Interview 63 Data
  • Victim Interview 64 Data
  • Victim Interview 65 Data
  • Victim Interview 66 Data
  • Victim Interview 67 Data
  • Victim Interview 68 Data
  • Victim Interview 69 Data
  • Victim Interview 70 Data
  • Victim Interview 71 Data
  • Victim Interview 72 Data
  • Victim Interview 73 Data
  • Victim Interview 74 Data
  • Victim Interview 75 Data
  • Victim Interview 76 Data
  • Victim Interview 77 Data
  • Victim Interview 78 Data
  • Victim Interview 79 Data
  • Victim Interview 80 Data
  • Victim Interview 81 Data
  • Victim Interview 82 Data
  • Victim Interview 83 Data
  • Victim Interview 84 Data
  • Victim Interview 85 Data
  • Victim Interview 86 Data
  • Victim Interview 87 Data
  • Victim Interview 88 Data
  • Victim Interview 89 Data
  • Victim Interview 90 Data
  • Victim Interview 91 Data
  • Victim Interview 92 Data
  • Victim Interview 93 Data
  • Victim Interview 94 Data
  • Victim Interview 95 Data
  • Victim Interview 96 Data
  • Victim Interview 97 Data
  • Victim Interview 98 Data
Description
Mode of access: Intranet.
Notes
Title from ICPSR DDI metadata of 2016-02-11.
Series Statement
ICPSR 3010
ICPSR (Series) 3010
Other Forms
Also available as downloadable files.
Copyright Not EvaluatedCopyright Not Evaluated
Technical Details
  • Staff View

    LEADER 11642cmm a2201753la 4500
    001 ICPSR03010
    003 MiAaI
    006 m f a u
    007 cr mn mmmmuuuu
    008 160211s2001 miu f a eng d
    035
      
      
    a| (MiAaI)ICPSR03010
    040
      
      
    a| MiAaI c| MiAaI
    245
    0
    0
    a| Factors Related to Domestic Violence Court Dispositions in a Large Midwestern Urban Area, 1997-1998 h| [electronic resource] b| [United States] c| Joanne Belknap, Dee L.R. Graham
    250
      
      
    a| 2006-03-30
    260
      
      
    a| Ann Arbor, Mich. b| Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor] c| 2001
    490
      
      
    a| ICPSR v| 3010
    516
      
      
    a| Numeric
    538
      
      
    a| Mode of access: Intranet.
    500
      
      
    a| Title from ICPSR DDI metadata of 2016-02-11.
    536
      
      
    a| United States Department of Justice. Office of Justice Programs. National Institute of Justice c| 96-WT-NX-0004
    506
      
      
    a| AVAILABLE. This study is freely available to the general public.
    530
      
      
    a| Also available as downloadable files.
    522
      
      
    a| United States
    520
    3
      
    a| The goal of this study was to identify factors that influence whether city misdemeanor domestic violence cases in which batterers are arrested by police result in dismissals, acquittals, or convictions in the courts, and how these cases are processed. The researchers sought to examine factors that influence court officials' decision-making in domestic violence cases, as well as factors that influence victim and witness reluctance in bringing batterers to successful adjudication. In Part 1 researchers merged pretrial services data with information from police and prosecutors' reports in the urban area under study to answer the following questions: (1) What is the rate of dismissals, acquittals, and convictions for misdemeanor court cases and what are the conditions of these sentences? (2) What factors in court cases are significantly related to whether the disposition is a dismissal, acquittal, or conviction, and how are these cases processed? In Part 2, judges, prosecutors, and public defenders were asked detailed questions about their level of knowledge about, attitudes toward, and self-reported behaviors regarding the processing of domestic violence cases to find out: (1) What roles do legal and extra-legal factors play in decision-makers' self-reported behaviors and attitudes? (2) How do decision-makers rate victim advocate and batterer treatment programs? (3) How do court professionals view the victim's role in the court process? and (4) To what degree do court professionals report victim-blaming attitudes and experiences? For Part 3 researchers used a stratified random sample to select court cases of misdemeanor domestic violence that would be transcribed and used for a content analysis to examine: (1) Who speaks in court and how? and (2) What is considered relevant by different court players? In Parts 4-103 victim surveys and interviews were administered to learn about battered women's experiences in both their personal lives and the criminal processing system. Researchers sought to answer the following questions: (1) How do victim/witnesses perceive their role in the prosecution of their abusers? (2) What factors inhibit them from pursuing prosecution? (3) What factors might help them pursue prosecution? and (4) How consistent are the victims'/witnesses' demographic and psychological profiles with existing research in this area? Domestic violence victims attending arraignment between January 1 and December 31 of 1997 were asked to complete surveys to identify their concerns about testifying against their partners and to evaluate the effectiveness of the court system in dealing with domestic violence cases (Part 4). The disposition of each case was subsequently determined by a research team member's examination of defendants' case files and/or court computer files. Upon case closure victims who had both completed a survey and indicated a willingness to be interviewed were contacted to participate in an interview (Parts 5-103). Variables in Part 1, Pretrial Services Data, include prior criminal history, current charges, case disposition, sentence, victim testimony, police testimony, victim's demeanor at trial, judge's conduct, type of abuse involved, weapons used, injuries sustained, and type of evidence available for trial. Demographic variables include age, sex, and race of defendants, victims, prosecutors, and judges. In Part 2, Professional Survey Data, respondents were asked about their tolerance for victims and offenders who appeared in court more than once, actions taken when substance abuse was involved, the importance of injuries in making a decision, attitudes toward battered women, the role of victim advocates and the police, views on restraining orders, and opinion on whether arrest is a deterrent. Demographic variables include age, sex, race, marital status, and years of professional experience. Variables in Part 3, Court Transcript Data, include number and type of charges, pleas, reasons for dismissals, types of evidence submitted by prosecutors and defense, substance abuse by victim and defendant, living arrangements and number of children of victim and defendant, specific type of abuse, injuries sustained, witnesses to injuries, police testimony, verdict, and sentence. Demographic variables include age and sex of defendant and victim and relationship of victim and defendant. In Part 4, Victim Survey Data, victims were asked about their relationship and living arrangements with the defendant, concerns about testifying in court, desired outcomes of case and punishment for defendant, emotional issues related to abuse, health problems, substance abuse, support networks, other violent domestic incidents and injuries, and safety concerns. Part 5 variables measured victims' safety at different stages of the criminal justice process and danger experienced due to further violent incidents, presence of weapons, and threats of homicide or suicide. Parts 6-103 contain the qualitative interview data.Cf: http://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR03010.v1
    505
      
      
    t| Pretrial Services Data
    505
      
      
    t| Professional Survey Data
    505
      
      
    t| Court Transcript Data
    505
      
      
    t| Victim Survey Data
    505
      
      
    t| Victim Safety and Danger Scale Data
    505
      
      
    t| Victim Interview 1 Data
    505
      
      
    t| Victim Interview 2 Data
    505
      
      
    t| Victim Interview 3 Data
    505
      
      
    t| Victim Interview 4 Data
    505
      
      
    t| Victim Interview 5 Data
    505
      
      
    t| Victim Interview 6 Data
    505
      
      
    t| Victim Interview 7 Data
    505
      
      
    t| Victim Interview 8 Data
    505
      
      
    t| Victim Interview 9 Data
    505
      
      
    t| Victim Interview 10 Data
    505
      
      
    t| Victim Interview 11 Data
    505
      
      
    t| Victim Interview 12 Data
    505
      
      
    t| Victim Interview 13 Data
    505
      
      
    t| Victim Interview 14 Data
    505
      
      
    t| Victim Interview 15 Data
    505
      
      
    t| Victim Interview 16 Data
    505
      
      
    t| Victim Interview 17 Data
    505
      
      
    t| Victim Interview 18 Data
    505
      
      
    t| Victim Interview 19 Data
    505
      
      
    t| Victim Interview 20 Data
    505
      
      
    t| Victim Interview 21 Data
    505
      
      
    t| Victim Interview 22 Data
    505
      
      
    t| Victim Interview 23 Data
    505
      
      
    t| Victim Interview 24 Data
    505
      
      
    t| Victim Interview 25 Data
    505
      
      
    t| Victim Interview 26 Data
    505
      
      
    t| Victim Interview 27 Data
    505
      
      
    t| Victim Interview 28 Data
    505
      
      
    t| Victim Interview 29 Data
    505
      
      
    t| Victim Interview 30 Data
    505
      
      
    t| Victim Interview 31 Data
    505
      
      
    t| Victim Interview 32 Data
    505
      
      
    t| Victim Interview 33 Data
    505
      
      
    t| Victim Interview 34 Data
    505
      
      
    t| Victim Interview 35 Data
    505
      
      
    t| Victim Interview 36 Data
    505
      
      
    t| Victim Interview 37 Data
    505
      
      
    t| Victim Interview 38 Data
    505
      
      
    t| Victim Interview 39 Data
    505
      
      
    t| Victim Interview 40 Data
    505
      
      
    t| Victim Interview 41 Data
    505
      
      
    t| Victim Interview 42 Data
    505
      
      
    t| Victim Interview 43 Data
    505
      
      
    t| Victim Interview 44 Data
    505
      
      
    t| Victim Interview 45 Data
    505
      
      
    t| Victim Interview 46 Data
    505
      
      
    t| Victim Interview 47 Data
    505
      
      
    t| Victim Interview 48 Data
    505
      
      
    t| Victim Interview 49 Data
    505
      
      
    t| Victim Interview 50 Data
    505
      
      
    t| Victim Interview 51 Data
    505
      
      
    t| Victim Interview 52 Data
    505
      
      
    t| Victim Interview 53 Data
    505
      
      
    t| Victim Interview 54 Data
    505
      
      
    t| Victim Interview 55 Data
    505
      
      
    t| Victim Interview 56 Data
    505
      
      
    t| Victim Interview 57 Data
    505
      
      
    t| Victim Interview 58 Data
    505
      
      
    t| Victim Interview 59 Data
    505
      
      
    t| Victim Interview 60 Data
    505
      
      
    t| Victim Interview 61 Data
    505
      
      
    t| Victim Interview 62 Data
    505
      
      
    t| Victim Interview 63 Data
    505
      
      
    t| Victim Interview 64 Data
    505
      
      
    t| Victim Interview 65 Data
    505
      
      
    t| Victim Interview 66 Data
    505
      
      
    t| Victim Interview 67 Data
    505
      
      
    t| Victim Interview 68 Data
    505
      
      
    t| Victim Interview 69 Data
    505
      
      
    t| Victim Interview 70 Data
    505
      
      
    t| Victim Interview 71 Data
    505
      
      
    t| Victim Interview 72 Data
    505
      
      
    t| Victim Interview 73 Data
    505
      
      
    t| Victim Interview 74 Data
    505
      
      
    t| Victim Interview 75 Data
    505
      
      
    t| Victim Interview 76 Data
    505
      
      
    t| Victim Interview 77 Data
    505
      
      
    t| Victim Interview 78 Data
    505
      
      
    t| Victim Interview 79 Data
    505
      
      
    t| Victim Interview 80 Data
    505
      
      
    t| Victim Interview 81 Data
    505
      
      
    t| Victim Interview 82 Data
    505
      
      
    t| Victim Interview 83 Data
    505
      
      
    t| Victim Interview 84 Data
    505
      
      
    t| Victim Interview 85 Data
    505
      
      
    t| Victim Interview 86 Data
    505
      
      
    t| Victim Interview 87 Data
    505
      
      
    t| Victim Interview 88 Data
    505
      
      
    t| Victim Interview 89 Data
    505
      
      
    t| Victim Interview 90 Data
    505
      
      
    t| Victim Interview 91 Data
    505
      
      
    t| Victim Interview 92 Data
    505
      
      
    t| Victim Interview 93 Data
    505
      
      
    t| Victim Interview 94 Data
    505
      
      
    t| Victim Interview 95 Data
    505
      
      
    t| Victim Interview 96 Data
    505
      
      
    t| Victim Interview 97 Data
    505
      
      
    t| Victim Interview 98 Data
    567
      
      
    a| Parts 1 and 3: All misdemeanor intimate partner domestic violence cases in the urban area in 1997. Part 2: All municipal judges, prosecutors, and public defenders in the urban area in 1997. Parts 4-103: All female victims of domestic violence in the urban area in 1997.
    650
      
    7
    a| battered women 2| icpsr
    650
      
    7
    a| case processing 2| icpsr
    650
      
    7
    a| decision making 2| icpsr
    650
      
    7
    a| disposition (legal) 2| icpsr
    650
      
    7
    a| domestic violence 2| icpsr
    650
      
    7
    a| misdemeanor offenses 2| icpsr
    650
      
    7
    a| offenders 2| icpsr
    650
      
    7
    a| sentencing 2| icpsr
    650
      
    7
    a| treatment programs 2| icpsr
    650
      
    7
    a| urban areas 2| icpsr
    650
      
    7
    a| victims 2| icpsr
    650
      
    7
    a| witnesses 2| icpsr
    653
    0
      
    a| ICPSR XVII.E. Social Institutions and Behavior, Crime and the Criminal Justice System
    653
    0
      
    a| NACJD XIII. Violence Against Women
    653
    0
      
    a| NACJD V. Courts
    653
    0
      
    a| NACJD XIV. Homicide Studies
    700
    2
      
    a| Belknap, Joanne u| University of Colorado, Departments of Sociology and Women's Studies.
    700
    2
      
    a| Graham, Dee L.R. u| University of Cincinnati, Department of Psychology
    710
    2
      
    a| Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research.
    830
      
    0
    a| ICPSR (Series) v| 3010
    856
    4
    0
    u| http://proxy.its.virginia.edu/login?url=http://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR03010.v1
    999
      
      
    w| WEB l| INTERNET m| UVA-LIB t| INTERNET
▾See more
▴See less

Availability

Access Online