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Eurobarometer 44.3OVR [electronic resource]: Employment, Unemployment, and Gender Equality, February-April 1996

Karlheinz Reif, Eric Marlier
Format
Computer Resource; Online
Published
Ann Arbor, Mich. Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor] 1998
Edition
2002-09-19
Series
ICPSR
Eurobarometer Survey Series
ICPSR (Series)
Access Restriction
AVAILABLE. This study is freely available to ICPSR member institutions.
Abstract
This round of Eurobarometer surveys queried respondents on a few standard Eurobarometer measures such as whether they attempted to persuade others close to them to share their views on subjects they held strong opinions about, whether they discussed political matters, and how they viewed the need for societal change, but the primary focus of the surveys was on employment, unemployment, and gender equality. During the fieldwork for Eurobarometer 44.3 (see EUROBAROMETER 44.3: HEALTH CARE ISSUES AND PUBLIC SECURITY, FEBRUARY-APRIL 1996 [ICPSR 6752]), an oversample (approximately 300 per country) of unemployed persons and housewives/househusbands, aged 15 years and over, was added to the basic sample and subsequently administered an additional set of questions. Students and retired were excluded from the oversample. Respondents who were employed or self-employed were asked questions concerning their job titles, the ratio of women to men holding the same title, number of people employed at their workplaces, how long they were continuously employed/self-employed, how they found out about their jobs, the type of organizations for which they worked, the number of hours worked, job satisfaction, the type of communication equipment used, and the circumstances under which they would reduce their hours or take unpaid leave. Employed and self-employed respondents were asked about the pay, training, skill level, variety, amount, pressure, and interest involved in their work. They also compared their jobs with jobs they were doing five years ago. Non-self-employed workers provided additional information regarding their level of involvement in decisions that affected their jobs, existence of promotional opportunities, indices of pay raises or dismissal, likelihood of leaving their jobs, and commitment to their current employers. Questions posed to unemployed respondents covered how long they had been unemployed, their former occupation, reasons for leaving their last position, and whether they had received any compensation. They were also asked if they were looking for a job, what approaches they used to find a job, the amount of time spent looking for a job, problems in trying to find a job, whether they would consider a position requiring different skills, a lower level of skills, worse physical conditions, or different hours, or if they would relocate. These respondents also indicated whether they had experienced boredom, depression, family tensions, loss of self-confidence, not enough money, increased difficulty in rearing children, or lack of contact with people as a result of being unemployed. All respondents were asked questions concerning gender equality. Respondents were asked to assess the current work situation for women with respect to wages, job security, promotional opportunities, and the number and variety of jobs available. Respondents were also asked to evaluate reasons why women less often held positions of responsibility and to prioritize areas of action to be taken to remedy existing inequalities. Respondents also rated the impact of women's working on the well-being of men, children, women, families, and couples. Demographic data collected on respondents include gender, age, nationality, marital status, occupation, income, left-right political self-placement, age at completion of education, number of people in household, number of children under 15 in household, subjective size of community, and region of residence.Cf: http://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR02443.v1
Contents
Dataset
Description
Mode of access: Intranet.
Notes
Title from ICPSR DDI metadata of 2016-02-11.
Series Statement
ICPSR 2443
ICPSR (Series) 2443
Other Forms
Also available as downloadable files.
Copyright Not EvaluatedCopyright Not Evaluated
Technical Details
  • Staff View

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    a| This round of Eurobarometer surveys queried respondents on a few standard Eurobarometer measures such as whether they attempted to persuade others close to them to share their views on subjects they held strong opinions about, whether they discussed political matters, and how they viewed the need for societal change, but the primary focus of the surveys was on employment, unemployment, and gender equality. During the fieldwork for Eurobarometer 44.3 (see EUROBAROMETER 44.3: HEALTH CARE ISSUES AND PUBLIC SECURITY, FEBRUARY-APRIL 1996 [ICPSR 6752]), an oversample (approximately 300 per country) of unemployed persons and housewives/househusbands, aged 15 years and over, was added to the basic sample and subsequently administered an additional set of questions. Students and retired were excluded from the oversample. Respondents who were employed or self-employed were asked questions concerning their job titles, the ratio of women to men holding the same title, number of people employed at their workplaces, how long they were continuously employed/self-employed, how they found out about their jobs, the type of organizations for which they worked, the number of hours worked, job satisfaction, the type of communication equipment used, and the circumstances under which they would reduce their hours or take unpaid leave. Employed and self-employed respondents were asked about the pay, training, skill level, variety, amount, pressure, and interest involved in their work. They also compared their jobs with jobs they were doing five years ago. Non-self-employed workers provided additional information regarding their level of involvement in decisions that affected their jobs, existence of promotional opportunities, indices of pay raises or dismissal, likelihood of leaving their jobs, and commitment to their current employers. Questions posed to unemployed respondents covered how long they had been unemployed, their former occupation, reasons for leaving their last position, and whether they had received any compensation. They were also asked if they were looking for a job, what approaches they used to find a job, the amount of time spent looking for a job, problems in trying to find a job, whether they would consider a position requiring different skills, a lower level of skills, worse physical conditions, or different hours, or if they would relocate. These respondents also indicated whether they had experienced boredom, depression, family tensions, loss of self-confidence, not enough money, increased difficulty in rearing children, or lack of contact with people as a result of being unemployed. All respondents were asked questions concerning gender equality. Respondents were asked to assess the current work situation for women with respect to wages, job security, promotional opportunities, and the number and variety of jobs available. Respondents were also asked to evaluate reasons why women less often held positions of responsibility and to prioritize areas of action to be taken to remedy existing inequalities. Respondents also rated the impact of women's working on the well-being of men, children, women, families, and couples. Demographic data collected on respondents include gender, age, nationality, marital status, occupation, income, left-right political self-placement, age at completion of education, number of people in household, number of children under 15 in household, subjective size of community, and region of residence.Cf: http://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR02443.v1
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